Terra Foundation-supported Events

Collection Loan: Icon of Modernism: Representing the Brooklyn Bridge, 1883–1950

From the collection of the Terra Collection for American Art, four works are exhibited in Icon of Modernism: Representing the Brooklyn Bridge, 1883–1950.  This exhibition is on view at the Georgia Museum of Art, September 17–December 11, 2016.

 The exhibition includes the following works from the Terra Foundation Collection:

For more information, please visit:  https://georgiamuseum.org/art/exhibitions/on-view

John Marin, 
Sailboat, Brooklyn Bridge, New York Skyline, 1934, oil on canvas board, 14 x 17 3/4in. (35.6 x 45.1cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2006.1
John Marin, Sailboat, Brooklyn Bridge, New York Skyline, 1934, oil on canvas board, 14 x 17 3/4in. (35.6 x 45.1cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2006.1
Exhibition/Collection Loan: Japan America: Points of Contact, 1876–1970

Following the “opening” of Japan by the United States Navy in 1853, international expositions began to alert artists and collectors in the West to the seemingly exotic art of Japan. This exhibition examines the reciprocal influence of these events in forming both the West’s conception of a Japanese aesthetic and its incorporation into both high and low art forms, as well as the response by the Japanese to the West’s interest and to Western art. It includes objects in a wide variety of media—fans, paintings, prints, vases, stoneware, and more—by American artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Winslow Homer, Milton Avery, and Mary Cassatt; and Japanese artists like Gen Yamaguchi and Kiyoshi Saito.

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Childe Hassam, The White Kimono and  Edmund Tarbell, In the Orchard are exhibited in  Japan America: Points of Contact, 1876–1970 organized by Cornell University’s Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.

The exhibition is also on view at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Ithaca, New York, August 27 – December 18, 2016 and Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California, February 12–May 21, 2017.

For more information, please visit:
 http://museum.cornell.edu/exhibitions/japanamerica-points-of-contact

Edmund Tarbell, In the Orchard, 1891, oil on canvas, 60 3/4 x 65 1/2 in. (154.3 x 166.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.141
Edmund Tarbell, In the Orchard, 1891, oil on canvas, 60 3/4 x 65 1/2 in. (154.3 x 166.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.141
Exhibition: Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr Jr. and Philip Johnson

Organized by the Liliane and David M. Stewart Program for Modern Design, this exhibition focuses on how the Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) first director, Alfred Barr, and curator of architecture, Philip Johnson, introduced modern design to North America. The exhibition’s narrative begins with Barr and Johnson’s travels in Europe in the late 1920s and early 1930s. What they saw there was a revelation: the rejection of ornament, practiced by leading European architects—such as Le Corbusier, J. J. P. Oud, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe–had  given rise to a purity of form that Barr and Johnson would dub the ‘International Style’. The exhibition traces the development of modern design from its origins at the Bauhaus in Dessau to Barr and Johnson’s radical experiments in their homes to MoMA’s nationally influential exhibitions in the 1930s and beyond. It includes more than 100 objects—including furniture, photographs, and industrial and graphic design—drawn from private and public collections.

This exhibition is also on view at the Davis Museum at Kunsthalle Bielefeld (March 24–July 16, 2017) and the Grey Art Gallery at New York University (autumn 2017).

For more information, please visit: https://www.wellesley.edu/davismuseum/whats-on/upcoming/node/90691

 

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Winslow Homer,
Winslow Homer, The Whittling Boy, 1873, Oil on canvas. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.12
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2016 to December 2016.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Winslow Homer,
Winslow Homer, The Whittling Boy, 1873, Oil on canvas. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.12
Exhibition: Abstract Expressionism

Organized by the Royal Academy of Arts, London with the collaboration of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, this exhibition explores the full breadth of Abstract Expressionism in the first survey of the movement since 1959. In the “age of anxiety” surrounding the Second World War and the years of free jazz and Beat poetry, visual artists broke from accepted conventions to unleash a new confidence in painting. The exhibition will bring together works by Pollock, Rothko, Still, de Kooning, Newman, Kline, Smith, Guston and Gorky. The exhibition will also present lesser-known figures who contributed to the development of the movement and works of photography and sculpture to re-evaluate the movement that placed New York as a capital of the art world.

This exhibition will also be on view at the Guggenheim Bilbao (January 10, 2017–April 1, 2017).

For more information, please visit: https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/abstract-expressionism

Exhibition: László Moholy-Nagy: Future Present

Co-organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Future Present is the first comprehensive retrospective of Moholy-Nagy’s work in the United States in nearly 50 years. The exhibition brings together more than 300 works to survey the career of this multimedia artist. Moholy, as he was known, came to prominence as a professor at the Bauhaus art school in Germany (1923–28). In 1937 he founded the New Bauhaus in Chicago, a school that continues today as the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

This exhibition is also on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (February 12–June 18, 2017).

For more information, please visit: http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/are-you-modern-moholy-nagy

Exhibition: Cloud & Crystal The Dorothee and Konrad Fischer Collection

This exhibition considers works of American Conceptual Art and Minimalism from the collection of Düsseldorf gallerist couple Dorothee and Konrad Fischer. The Fischers were one of the first European art dealers to take a consistent interest in the latest art of their own time. Regarded with justice as a pioneer of Conceptual Art, he converted his exhibition space into a meeting point for artists and collectors from around the world, catapulting Düsseldorf to the forefront of the contemporary avant-garde scene. The exhibition juxtaposes paintings of artists like Jackson Pollock and Robert Rauschenberg – which primarily target the senses and emotions – with conspicuously “aloof” works of  Conceptual Art, depicting the radical upheaval in the forms of creative expression occurred in tandem with the societal transformations around 1968. Emerging alongside innovative approaches to painting was an art that opposed the conceptual aspect, the idea – now regarded as a valid work of art in and of itself, and without being materialized in an object – to the subjectivity of painterly gesture.

For more information, please visit: http://www.kunstsammlung.de/en/discover/exhibition-preview.html

Exhibition: Procession: The Art of Norman Lewis

This exhibition marks the first comprehensive overview of the art of Norman Lewis: a participant in the Harlem art community, an innovator of Abstract Expressionism and a politically-conscious activist. Covering the 1930s to 1970s, the 60 paintings and works on paper revolve chronologically and thematically around six motifs: In the City, Visual Sound, Rhythm of Nature, Ritual, Civil Rights and Summation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dca/supp_info/norman_lewis.html

Exhibition: Jacob A. Riis: Light in Dark Places

Jacob Riis (1849–1914) was a Danish-born newspaper reporter who, through his writing and photographs, publicized the crisis in housing, education, crime, and poverty at the height of late-nineteenth-century European immigration to New York City. By using photographs to reveal the inhumane conditions of the poor, Riis initiated the tradition of social documentary photography. Riis’s images are being shown in multiple formats—negatives, lantern slides, and wood engravings or halftones in books—to show how they were seen by his public.

This exhibition is on view at the Library of Congress, Washington, DC (April 14 – September 5, 2016); The Museum of the City of New York (October 14, 2015 – March 20, 2016); the Kunstforeningen Gammelstrand in Copenhagen, Denmark (October 1, 2016 – January 8, 2017); and the Ribe Kunstmuseum in Ribe, Denmark (January 21, 2017 – May 14, 2017).

For more information, please visit: http://en.glstrand.dk/exhibitions/upcoming/jacob-a-riis.aspx

Exhibition: Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art

This exhibition presents a survey of American printmaking from its beginnings in the early eighteenth century to the present. Drawing on approximately 140 prints of various types from the National Gallery of Art’s holdings, it covers a wide range of movements, from the colonial period and the Revolution to the emergence of Pop art and prints of the twenty-first century. The exhibition includes work by James John Audubon, James McNeill Whistler, Winslow Homer, Mary Cassatt, Andy Warhol, and Glenn Ligon, among many other artists.

This exhibition is also on view at the Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, Mexico City (February 7–April 30, 2017) and the Dallas Museum of Art, (May 28–September 3, 2017).

For more information, please visit: http://www.ngprague.cz/en/exposition-detail/three-centuries-of-american-art-in-prints-from-the-national-gallery-of-art/

Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: Samuel F. B. Morse’s Gallery of the Louvre and the Art of Invention

Known today primarily for his role in the development of the electromagnetic telegraph and his namesake code, Samuel Morse began his career as a painter. Created between 1831 and 1833 in Paris and New York, Gallery of the Louvre was Morse’s masterwork and the culmination of his studies in Europe. Morse’s “gallery picture,” a form first popularized in the seventeenth century, is the only major example of such in the history of American art. For this canvas, Morse selected masterpieces from the Louvre’s collection and imaginatively “reinstalled” them in one of the museum’s grandest spaces, the Salon Carré.

The exhibition Samuel F. B. Morse’s Gallery of the Louvre and the Art of Invention, a Terra Collection Initiative, is accompanied by an anthology of the same title, published by the Terra Foundation and distributed by Yale University Press.

The exhibition is on view at:

For more information, please visit:
http://pem.org/exhibitions/194-samuel_f_b_morses_gallery_of_the_louvre_and_the_art_of_invention

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831‒1833, oil on canvas, 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.51
Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831‒1833, oil on canvas, 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.51
Exhibition: William N. Copley: The World According to CPLY

William Nelson Copley was both an outsider and an insider in the art world. Known by his signature moniker, CPLY, he created a body of largely figurative paintings, drawings, and installations. His work resisted prevailing trends towards abstraction in post-World War II art and provided the foreground for his lifelong preoccupations with Americana. Preferring no one particular style, Copley’s experimentation with form, style, color, and material continued throughout his career. He was also a collector, patron, and connector of some of the most important artists of the twentieth century, including European Surrealists and American Pop artists such as Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Max Ernst, René Magritte, and Andy Warhol. Co-organized by the Menil Collection and Fondazione Prada, this exhibition of 120 works traces Copley’s stylistic and thematic development, examining the full arc of his career from the late 1940s to the 1990s.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.fondazioneprada.org/project/william-n-copley/?lang=en

Exhibition: Agnes Martin. A Retrospective.

Agnes Martin (1912–2004) is perhaps most recognized for her evocative paintings marked out in subtle pencil lines and pale color washes. Although restrained, her style is underpinned by a deep conviction in the emotive and expressive power of art. “Without awareness of beauty, innocence, and happiness,” Martin wrote, “one cannot make works of art.”

This extensive exhibition covers the full breadth of her practice, revealing Martin’s early and little-known experiments with different media and tracing her development from biomorphic abstraction to the mesmerizing grid and striped canvases that have become her hallmark.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.guggenheim.org/exhibition/agnes-martin

Exhibition: Bruce Davidson. Retrospective

This exhibition presents a survey of photographer Bruce Davidson’s career, which spans more than 60 years. It focuses on some of the artist’s best-known series, including “Brooklyn Gang” and “East 100th Street” and photographs from the Civil Rights movement. Davidson’s unique style of documentary photography and his interest in the struggles and triumphs of different groups allows for a unique perspective on life in the United States. The exhibition includes approximately 200 prints, presented in 16 thematic sections.

The exhibition is also on view at C/O Berlin (March 12 – May 20, 2017); and Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam, The Netherlands (fall 2017).

Additional information is forthcoming.

Collection Loan: Wild Spaces, Open Places: Hunting and Fishing in American Art

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Richard LaBarre Goodwin’s Two Snipes is exhibited in Wild Spaces, Open Places: Hunting and Fishing in American Art.  This exhibition is on view at the Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee, October 23, 2016–January 15, 2017; Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska, February 12–May 7, 2017; Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont, June 4–August 27, 2017; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, September 24–December 17, 2017.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.dixon.org/current-exhibitions

 

Richard La Barre Goodwin,
Richard La Barre Goodwin, Two Snipes, between 1880 and 1902 Oil on canvas 20 1/8 x 17 1/8 in. (51.1 x 43.5 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John Estabrook C1982.2
Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative:William Merritt Chase

Terra Collection InitiativeWilliam Merritt Chase is co-organized by The Phillips Collection; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia; and the Terra Foundation.

The exhibition features six works from the Terra Foundation collection:

William Merritt Chase  is accompanied by an exhibition catalogue with texts in English and Italian.

This exhibition is on view as William Merritt Chase: A Modern Master at the The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, (June 4–September 11, 2016) and as William Merritt Chase at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, (October 9, 2016–January 16, 2017) and Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia, Venice, Italy (February 10–May 28, 2017).

For more information, please visit:  http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/william-merritt-chase

William Merritt Chase,  Spring Flowers (Peonies), by 1889, 48 x 48 in. (121.9 x 121.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.32
William Merritt Chase, Spring Flowers (Peonies), by 1889, 48 x 48 in. (121.9 x 121.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.32
Collection Loan: The Color Line: Les artistes africains-américains et la ségrégation/The Color Line: African-American Artists and Segregation

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Bar-b-que by Jacob Lawrence, and Between Acts by Archibald Motley, Jr. are exhibited in The Color Line: Les artistes africains-américains et la ségrégation/The Color Line:  African-American Artists and Segregation, on view at the Musée du quai Branly, Paris, France, October 4, 2016–January 22, 2017.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.quaibranly.fr/en/exhibitions-and-events/at-the-museum/exhibitions/event-details/e/the-color-line-36687/

Jacob Lawrence, Bar-b-que, 1942, opaque watercolor (gouache) on wove paper, 30 7/8 x 22 1/2in. (78.4 x 57.2cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art  Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2013.1
Jacob Lawrence, Bar-b-que, 1942, opaque watercolor (gouache) on wove paper, 30 7/8 x 22 1/2in. (78.4 x 57.2cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2013.1