All Grants


Art Institute of Chicago
$300,000
Chicago, Illinois
2015

To support America After the Fall: Painting in the 1930s, an exhibition that tells the story of this turbulent decade by surveying the varied works of artists such as Edward Hopper, Thomas Hart Benton, Ben Shahn, Philip Evergood, Stuart Davis, Charles Demuth, Charles Sheeler, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Grant Wood. The exhibition travels to the Musée de l’Orangerie (Paris) and the Royal Academy of Arts (London).

Baltimore Museum of Art
$300,000
Baltimore, Maryland
2015

To support Matisse/Diebenkorn, co-organized with the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. This exhibition focuses on the artistic influence of French modernist Henri Matisse on American Abstract Expressionist and Bay Area Figurative artist Richard Diebenkorn. It travels to both co-organizing venues.

Barbican Centre Trust
$344,000
London, united Kingdom
2015

To support The World of Charles and Ray Eames, a survey of the designers’ dynamic career focusing specifically on the Eames Office, where the couple, their collaborators, and their staff initiated an array of projects such as architecture, furniture and product design, film, photography, multi-media installation, exhibitions, and new models for education. This exhibition travels to the Toronto Design Exchange and an additional international venue.

Bibliothèque National de France
$150,000
Paris, France
2015

To support Old World, New Look: Richard Avedon’s France, which examines the relationship of American photographer Richard Avedon to Paris, focusing on work he produced and influenced between 1945 and 1980. The exhibition draws on previously unpublished materials from the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences archives and extensive correspondence between Avedon and French photographer Jacque Henri Lartigue.

Centre Pompidou-Metz
$117,000
Metz, France
2015

To support the exhibition Warhol Underground, which focuses on Andy Warhol’s use of music and performance in his multimedia productions, paying particular attention to the artist’s collaborations with the Velvet Underground, John Cage, and Merce Cunningham.

Henry Moore Foundation
$10,000
Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
2015

To support a curatorial travel grant in preparation for an exhibition of work by Christine Kozlov at Henry Moore Institute (HMI). The grant allows Dr. Jo Melvin, Reader in Fine Art Theory at Chelsea College of Fine Arts, and Pavel Pyś, Exhibitions and Displays Curator at HMI, to travel to the United States to conduct interviews and research.

High Museum of Art
$250,000
Atlanta, Georgia
2015

To support the retrospective Walker Evans: Depth of Field, co-organized with the Josef Albers Museum, in Bottrop, Germany. In addition to the two co-organizing venues, the exhibition travels to the Vancouver Art Gallery in fall 2016.

The Liliane and David M. Stewart Program for Modern Design
$250,000
Montreal, Canada
2015

To support Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr, Jr., and Philip Johnson, an exhibition that focuses on how the Museum of Modern Art’s first Director, Alfred Barr, and curator of architecture, Philip Johnson, introduced modern design to North America. The exhibition traces the development of modern design from its origins at the Bauhaus, in Dessau, Germany, to Barr and Johnson’s experiments in their homes to MoMA’s exhibitions in the 1930s and beyond. It travels to the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Davis Museum at Wellesley College.

Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art
$200,000
Evanston, Illinois
2015

To support Charlotte Moorman and the Avant-Garde, 1960–1980, an exhibition examining the creative activities and legacy of American avant-garde artist Charlotte Moorman. It features artworks of diverse media, and travels to the Grey Art Gallery, New York University, and a European venue.

Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
$200,000
Paris, France
2015

To support Warhol. Unlimited, organized in cooperation with the Dia Art Foundation, which focuses on Andy Warhol’s curatorial practice. Concentrating on the exhibition as a medium, this exhibition examines an overlooked, yet central, component of the artist’s work by presenting rooms wherein multiple versions of his series can be viewed together in a single space.