Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Robert Smithson: Time Crystals

Robert Smithson: Time Crystals is the first exhibition in Australia dedicated to the artist. Best known for his radical land art of the 1960s and early 1970s, Smithson is now widely recognized as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Inspired by ideas of crystalline geometry and non-biological time, he redefined abstraction and challenged art history.

Featuring new research on the artist’s practice, Time Crystals presents sculpture, photography, film, drawings, and texts borrowed from major Australian and international collections. It also includes the most extensive display of Smithson’s manuscript and archival material to date drawn from the Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt Papers at the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art.

This exhibition is also on view at The University of Queensland (March 10 – July 8, 2018).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.monash.edu/muma/exhibitions/exhibition-archive/2018/Robert-Smithson-Time-Crystals

Collection Loan: John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age

From the collection of the Terra Collection for American Art, John Singer Sargent’s A Parisian Beggar Girl and Dennis Miller Bunker’s The Mirror are exhibited in John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age.  This exhibition is on view at the Art Institute of Chicago, June 20 – September 30, 2018.

 

 

For more information, please visit:

http://www.artic.edu/exhibitions

John Singer Sargent, A Parisian Beggar Girl, c. 1880, oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 17 3/16 in. (64.5 x 43.7 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.14
Exhibition: Music of Color: Sam Gilliam, 1964–1973

The Music of Color presents 50 works by American abstract painter Sam Gilliam from public and private collections in Europe and the United States. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture, creating works recognized for monumentality and forceful use of color.

For more information, please visit:
https://kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/exhibitions/2018/gilliam

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

William Stanley Haseltine, Rocks at Nahant, 1864, oil on canvas, 22 3/8 x 40 1/2in. (56.8 x 102.9cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.65
Exhibition: Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire will examine Cole’s work within a global context. The exhibition will showcase the artist’s most iconic works, including The Oxbow (1836) and his five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36) as a direct outcome of his transatlantic career, and examine Cole’s legacy in establishing a school of 19th-century landscape art in America.

This exhibition is also on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (January 30 – May 13, 2018).

For more information, please visit: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/thomas-coles-journey

Collection Loan: Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Jane Peterson’s Marché aux Fleurs is exhibited in Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad. This exhibition is also on view at the Mattatuck Museum, November 19, 2017–January 28, 2018; Long Island Museum of Art, Stony Brook, New York, February 11–April 22, 2018; and the Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, May 13–July 22, 2018.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.hydecollection.org/

Jane C. Peterson, Marché au Fleurs, 1908, oil on canvas, 17 1/8 x 23 1/8 in. (43.5 x 58.7 cm), 1994.17
Exhibition: Afro-Atlantic Histories

Co-organized by Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) and Instituto Tomie Ohtake, Afro-Atlantic Histories marks the 130th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Brazil. The exhibition features paintings that explore the history of one of the greatest forced population migrations in world history. The Atlantic became an exit route but also an arrival route: a place of exile and of birth for many diasporic populations that have shaped today’s social and cultural contexts in the Americas and the Caribbean. Artists include Robert Duncanson (1821–1872), Archibald Motley (1891–1981), Aaron Douglas (1899–1979), Lois Marilou Jones (1905–1998), and John Biggers (1924–2001).

For more information, please visit:

https://masp.org.br/en/exhibitions/afro-atlantic-histories

Collection loan: Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting

This exhibition explores Homer’s relationship to photography, including his travels with other artists and photographers during the Civil War. From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Homer’s On Guard will be exhibited in dialogue with painting, printmaking, drawing, and photography that was central to Homer’s artistic practice.  Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting is on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, June 23–October 28, 2018.  Homer’s On Guard exhibited though September 1, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.bowdoin.edu/art-museum/exhibitions/2018/winslow-homer-camera.shtml

Winslow Homer, On Guard, 1864, oil on canvas, 12 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. (31.1 x 23.5 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.11
Exhibition: American Masters

This exhibition tells the story of the formation of the National Gallery of Australia’s  American collection. From Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Pop, Neo-Dada and Photo-Realism, to Conceptual, Land and Performance Art, American Masters examines how a generation of young Americans challenged local traditions and reinvented modern art, inspired by European émigrés including Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse, Piet Mondrian and Josef Albers. The international impact of major American artists between the 1940s and 1980s is captured in masterworks by Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Chuck Close, Donald Judd, Eva Hesse and Louise Bourgeois. Highlights include paintings and works on paper by artists of the New York School and a selection of light works by Dan Flavin, Bruce Nauman, Keith Sonnier and James Turrell.

For more information, please visit: 
https://nga.gov.au/americanmasters/default.cfm

Exhibition: Irving Penn: Centennial

This major retrospective of the photographs of Irving Penn commemorates the centennial of the artist’s birth, and will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the artist to date. Over the course of his nearly 70-year career, Penn mastered a pared-down aesthetic of studio photography that is distinguished for its meticulous attention to composition, nuance, and detail.

This exhibition was also on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (April 24–July 30, 2017), the Grand Palais, Paris, France (September 21, 2017–January 29, 2018), and C/O Berlin, Berlin, Germany (March 24–July 1, 2018). 

For more information, please visit:

https://ims.com.br/exposicao/irving-penn-centenario-ims-paulista/

Exhibition: Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago

Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago examines and illuminates the distinctive vein of industrial films which Chicago became known for in the 1950s and 1960s, and their compelling relationship to more avant-garde film experiments produced by the same artists and designers, including, most prominently, Morton and Millie Goldsholl and their firm Goldsholl and Associates. The Goldsholls were part of a generation of designers that emerged from the Institute of Design, where László Moholy-Nagy famously fostered a curriculum of aesthetic experimentation and social engagement. The Goldsholls’ innovative integration of film with other forms of visual production such as print advertising and brand development placed them at the forefront of their peers in design, and the wider community of filmmakers in Chicago. Designers in Film is the first exhibition to focus on the relationship between film and mid-twentieth century art and design in Chicago, and to study this history as a particular outgrowth of the city’s social, artistic, and political climate. The exhibition features highly inventive moving images alongside materials related to their creation, ranging from designed objects to drawings, print advertisements, photographs, and other ephemera.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/designers-in-film.html

Exhibition: Picture Fiction: Kenneth Josephson and Contemporary Photography

Chicago conceptual photographer Kenneth Josephson (b. 1932) has spent his career scrutinizing photography’s inherent reproducibility and circulation, making use of a mass-cultural archive of images, and mastering self-reflexive, often humorous devices–methods undoubtedly a result of Josephson’s years at the Institute of Design, where as a student he studied under Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. He afterward went on to teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for nearly forty years. Examining Josephson’s production from roughly 1960–1980, Picture Fiction focuses on his four main, ongoing series: Images within Images, Marks and Evidence, History of Photography Series, and Archaeological Series. Largely drawn from the MCA Chicago’s permanent collection, the exhibition reveals concerns shared by Josephson and conceptual artists emerging in the 1960s, and moreover, draws parallels between his practice and contemporary artists.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Picture-Fiction-Kenneth-Josephson-And-Contemporary-Photography

Exhibition: South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980

During the 1960s and 1970s, Chicago was shaped by art and ideas produced and circulated on the South Side. Yet the history of the period’s creative and social ferment has often remained segregated by the city’s social, political, and geographic divides. South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980—organized by the Smart Museum in collaboration with the DuSable Museum of African American History and presented concurrently with South Side Stories: Holdings at the DuSable—takes a nuanced look at the cultural history of Chicago’s South Side during this momentous era of change and conflict, with a focus on artists of the Black Arts Movement. Through nearly 100 objects, the show upends dominant narratives of the period and unearths rich stories by examining watershed cultural moments from the Hairy Who to the Wall of Respect, from the Civil Rights movement to the AfriCOBRA, from vivid protest posters to visionary outsider art, and from the Free University movement to the radical jazz of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/south-side-stories-rethinking-chicago-art/

Exhibition: Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow

Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow explores Chicago’s history of robust recognition and early acceptance of self-taught and outsider art and artists. The exhibition presents intrinsic themes embodied in the works of 12 artists, including Chicago icons, Henry Darger, Lee Godie, Joseph Yoakum, and others. Themes found in several artists’ works and represented here include the psychologically-charged tension in oppositions and contradictions; interaction between high style and the vernacular, between nature and culture; drawing on memory and the expressive use of line and form as a survival mechanism; immigration and/or relocation as a defining experience; surviving the African American experience; and the power of portraiture as a view into society, psyche, and soul.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.art.org/chicago-calling-art-against-the-flow

Exhibition: 3–D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980

3-D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980 examines the little-known sculptural work and dimensional painting made by the Chicago Imagists during the early years of their practice. As the first in-depth exploration of the overall affinity of Imagist artists for objects, the exhibition features artists who worked individually to craft unique approaches, but who shared key influences, such as Surrealism and the Surrealist objects. In addition to members of the original Imagist groups, the exhibition includes work by Don Baum, the chief curator of the Imagist moment; Ray Yoshida, the teacher with whom many Imagists studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; as well as H.C. Westermann, arguably the point of origin for the exhibition.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://tang.skidmore.edu/exhibitions/238-3-d-doings-the-imagist-object-in-chicago-art-1964-1980

Exhibition: Todros Geller: Strange Worlds

Todros Geller: Strange Worlds focuses on the multifaceted oeuvre of Todros Geller (1889–1949), an influential Chicago artist and central figure in the history of modern American Jewish art. Born in Ukraine, Geller immigrated to Chicago in 1918, which remained his home until his death. An active proponent of the concept of Jewish art, he served as a mentor to numerous Chicago Jewish artists and as a prominent educator, first as a teacher at the Jewish People’s Institute and Jane Addams Hull House, then as supervisor of art for the College of Jewish Studies (later Spertus Institute) and acting director of The Jewish Museum in Chicago. In both work and life, Geller reflected the prevailing social, political, and artistic concerns of his time, while remaining intimately entwined with Chicago’s evolving Jewish community and its efforts to establish, maintain, and promote Jewish identity.

This exhibition draws from the unique holdings from the Spertus Institute’s collection to survey the broad scope of Geller’s creative endeavors. In addition to a broad range of paintings, prints, and works on paper, the collection includes an extensive archive of Geller’s personal materials, encompassing preparatory sketches, letters, books, postcards, periodicals, news articles, photographs, posters, book illustrations, and bookplates. Todros Geller: Strange Worlds draws on these unique resources—the majority on view for the first time—to examine the public and private concerns that animated Geller’s work throughout his career.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.spertus.edu/exhibitions/strange-worlds

Exhibition: Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power presents the work made by leading African American artists between 1963 and 1983. Bringing together more than 150 objects from private and public collections, the exhibition features paintings, collages, photographs, prints, and sculpture. The exhibition considers the different ways in which approximately fifty artists from across the US—including Norman Lewis (1909–1979), Romare Bearden (1911–1988), Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), Wadsworth Jarrell (b. 1929), Betye Saar (b. 1926), Faith Ringgold (b. 1930), John Outterbridge (b. 1933), and Sam Gilliam (b. 1933)—understood what it meant to be Black within their artistic practice.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/soul_of_a_nation