Terra Foundation-supported Events

Collection Loan: Mary Cassatt: Une impressionniste américaine à Paris (Mary Cassatt: An American Impressionist in Paris)

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Mary Cassatt’s Summertime and Jenny and her Sleepy Child are exhibited in Mary Cassatt: An American Impressionist in Paris. This exhibition is jointly developed by US curator Dr. Nancy Mowll Mathews, Eugénie Prendergast Senior Curator and Lecturer, Emerita from Williams College, in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and in France, by Pierre Curie, director of the Revue de l’Art, chief curator of heritage, and curator of the Musée Jacquemart-André.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com/en/mary-cassatt

 

Mary Cassatt, Summertime, 1894, oil on canvas, 39 5/8 x 32 in. (100.6 x 81.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1988.25
Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

Three works from the Terra Foundation for American Art are on loan for two years to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Exhibited in the permanent collection galleries are Charles Courtney Curran’s, In the Luxembourg (Garden), 1889,  Childe Hassam’s, French Peasant Girl, 1883, and Maurice Prendergast’s, The Luxembourg Garden, Paris, 1890-94.  These works by American artists are on loan in conjunction with a visiting professorship at the University of Oxford.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Childe Hassam French Peasant Girl, c. 1883, Oil on canvas, 21 5/8 x 13 7/8 in. (54.9 x 35.2 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1989.21
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Martin Johnson Heade, Still Life with Apple Blossoms in a Nautilus Shell, 1870, oil on canvas, 21 x 17 in. (53.3 x 43.2 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 1999.7
Exhibition: A Home for Surrealism

A Home for Surrealism offers an in-depth exploration of a select group of painters who planted domestic roots for the surrealist idiom in the 1940s and 1950s. Working in and around Chicago, Gertrude Abercrombie, Dorothea Tanning, John Wilde, Julia Thecla, Harold Noecker, and Julio de Diego interpreted the European movement as something at once more personal and more accessible to its audience. Thematizing the interior while also reconceptualizing ideas of imagination and fantasy, these artists offer tableaus that emphasize the narrative capacities of self and home. While Chicago has long been acknowledged as an important center for the exhibition and collection of European surrealist painting, its own practitioners deserve more widespread recognition. Through their distinct motifs and styles, these artists made surrealism into something that was local to Chicago, even as it acknowledged its international foundations. Working with a team of scholars, The Arts Club, which was on the forefront of introducing surrealism in the 1920s and 30s, offers a focused and revelatory snapshot of Chicago surrealism.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artsclubchicago.org/exhibition/home-for-surrealism/

Exhibition: James Rosen­quist: Paint­ing as Im­mer­sion

This retrospective ex­hi­bi­tion of Pop Art icon James Rosen­quist (1933–2017) will present his massive works in the context of their cul­tu­r­al, so­cial, and po­lit­i­cal di­men­sions. Along with archival mate­rials and doc­u­ments de­sig­nat­ed by the artist as source ma­te­rials, some of which have not previously been ex­hi­b­it­ed, the show will re­veal Rosen­quist’s marked in­ter­est in history and the political events of his time.

This exhibition was also on view at the Museum Ludwig, Cologne (November 18, 2017–March 4, 2018).

For more information, please visit:
https://en.aros.dk/exhibitions_/2018/james-rosenquist/

Exhibition: The Water Lilies: American Abstract Painting and the Last Monet

In 1955, Alfred Barr brought one of Claude Monet’s large Water Lilies panels into the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, in New York, at a time when these great “decorations,” still in the studio in Giverny, were beginning to attract the attention of collectors and museums. Monet was presented at that time as “a bridge between the naturalism of early Impressionism and the highly developed school of Abstract Art” in New York, with his Water Lilies seen in the context of Pollock’s paintings, such as Autumn Rhythm (number 30), 1950. The reception of these later Monet works resonated with American Abstract Expression, then coming into the museum collections. This exhibition includes a selection of some of Monet’s later works and around twenty major paintings by American artists such as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Clyfford Still, Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Philip Guston, Joan Mitchell, Mark Tobey, Sam Francis, Jean-Paul Riopelle and Ellsworth Kelly.

An international symposium, « Ils ont continué Monet. La réception américaine des Nymphéas,” will be held at the Musée d’Orsay on May 30 & 31 in conjunction with the exhibition. To consult the program and reserve, please visit the Musée d’Orsay website.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.musee-orangerie.fr/en/event/water-lilies-american-abstract-painting-and-last-monet

 

Exhibition: Chiura Obata: An American Modern

Chiura Obata (1885–1975) was one of the most significant Japanese American artists working on the West Coast in the last century. Born in Okayama, Japan, Obata emigrated to the United States in 1903 and embarked on a seven-decade career that saw the enactment of anti-immigration laws and the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. This exhibition presents an unprecedented survey of Obata’s rich and varied body of work that includes over 150 paintings and personal effects, many of which have never been on public display.

This exhibition is also on view at the Art, Design, and Architecture Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara (January 13–April 29, 2018), the Okayama Prefectural Museum (January 18–March 10, 2019), and the Crocker Art Museum (June 23–September 29, 2019).

For more information, please visit:
https://umfa.utah.edu/chiura-obata

Exhibition: The American Dream: Pop to the Present. Prints from the British Museum

This exhibition presents the British Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition presents prints by celebrated American artists Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, and others. Taking inspiration from the world around them—billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects—these American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures.

This exhibition was also on view at the British Museum (March 9–June 18, 2017).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.fondationcustodia.fr/The-American-Dream-pop-to-the-present-118

Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstrokes, 1967. Sérigraphie en couleur, 555 x 765 mm/584 x 789 mm (feuille). British Museum, Londres 1979,1215.1 © Trustees of the British Museum et © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein New York/Adagp, Paris, 2018
Exhibition: Anni Albers

Co-organized by the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and the Tate Modern, London, Anni Albers showcases the multifaceted weaver’s long career. Albers (1899–1994) studied during the 1920s at the Bauhaus School. After emigrating to the United States, with her husband Josef Albers, she taught at Black Mountain College. At the center of her creative achievement are her woven images, characterized by complex textile structures, abstraction, and subtle coloration.

The exhibition is also on view at Tate Modern, London (October 11, 2018–January 27, 2019).

For more information, please visit:
http://www.kunstsammlung.de/en/discover/exhibitions/anni-albers.html

Exhibition: Christo & Jeanne-Claude: Barrels and The Mastaba 1958–2018

The Serpentine Galleries presents Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s history of barrel artworks. Since 1958, barrels have been a dominant feature of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s sculptures and installations, which they have erected at varying scales internationally. The exhibition will offer new perspectives on Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s career to the large-scale, wrapped and fabric-based works for which they are best known. Simultaneously, Christo will present The Mastaba (Project for London, Hyde Park, Serpentine Lake), a temporary floating sculpture on The Serpentine lake.

For more information, please visit: http://www.serpentinegalleries.org/exhibitions-events/christo-and-jeanne-claude-barrels-and-mastaba-1958-2018

Exhibition: Sculpting a Chicago Artist: Richard Hunt and his Teachers: Nelli Bar and Egon Weiner

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago cultivated artist Richard Hunt in the 1950s by the guidance of two dynamic teachers. Nelli Bar taught Richard Hunt during his adolescence, and Egon Weiner was his college professor. Bar and Weiner represent the generation of artists who fled Europe after the rise of the Nazi regime and found Chicago as the new home for their artistic ambitions. Both received their education in European academies under prominent teachers during the 1920s. Weiner and Bar produced a new post-war generation of artists, including Richard Hunt. Bar continued to accompany Hunt’s career as he recalls: “She has influenced me as a person over our 30-year relationship.” Hunt remembers Weiner for “his exuberance and nurturing manner – and for being a bundle of energy.” This energy was transmitted to his student Richard Hunt as the Museum of Modern Art purchased one of his sculptures in 1957 just after his graduation and eventually he evolved into one of the most prominent Chicago sculptors and an international master.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.oakton.edu/about/thearts/museum/future_exhibitions/index.php

Exhibition: Gordon Matta-Clark: Mutation in Space

The National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo will present first full-scale retrospective of American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978) in Asia. The presentation will include his sculptures, photographs, videos and drawings. Known for “building cuts” projects in which he removed parts of floors and walls from buildings to be demolished, the exhibition will also include his work in street and performance art.

For more information please visit:
http://www.momat.go.jp/english/am/2018/

Exhibition: Robert Smithson: Time Crystals

Robert Smithson: Time Crystals is the first exhibition in Australia dedicated to the artist. Best known for his radical land art of the 1960s and early 1970s, Smithson is now widely recognized as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Inspired by ideas of crystalline geometry and non-biological time, he redefined abstraction and challenged art history.

Featuring new research on the artist’s practice, Time Crystals presents sculpture, photography, film, drawings, and texts borrowed from major Australian and international collections. It also includes the most extensive display of Smithson’s manuscript and archival material to date drawn from the Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt Papers at the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art.

This exhibition is also on view at The University of Queensland (March 10 – July 8, 2018).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.monash.edu/muma/exhibitions/exhibition-archive/2018/Robert-Smithson-Time-Crystals

Collection Loan: John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age/

From the collection of the Terra Collection for American Art, John Singer Sargent’s A Parisian Beggar Girl and Dennis Miller Bunker’s The Mirror are exhibited in John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age.  This exhibition is on view at the Art Institute of Chicago, June 20 – September 30, 2018.

 

 

For more information, please visit:

http://www.artic.edu/exhibitions

John Singer Sargent, A Parisian Beggar Girl, c. 1880, oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 17 3/16 in. (64.5 x 43.7 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.14
Exhibition: Music of Color: Sam Gilliam, 1964–1973

The Music of Color presents 50 works by American abstract painter Sam Gilliam from public and private collections in Europe and the United States. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture, creating works recognized for monumentality and forceful use of color.

For more information, please visit:
https://kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/exhibitions/2018/gilliam

Exhibition: Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire will examine Cole’s work within a global context. The exhibition will showcase the artist’s most iconic works, including The Oxbow (1836) and his five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36) as a direct outcome of his transatlantic career, and examine Cole’s legacy in establishing a school of 19th-century landscape art in America.

This exhibition is also on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (January 30 – May 13, 2018).

For more information, please visit: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/thomas-coles-journey

Collection loan: Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting

This exhibition explores Homer’s relationship to photography, including his travels with other artists and photographers during the Civil War. From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Homer’s On Guard will be exhibited in dialogue with painting, printmaking, drawing, and photography that was central to Homer’s artistic practice.  Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting is on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, June 23–October 28, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.bowdoin.edu/art-museum/exhibitions/2018/winslow-homer-camera.shtml

Winslow Homer, On Guard, 1864, oil on canvas, 12 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. (31.1 x 23.5 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.11
Exhibition: Picture Fiction: Kenneth Josephson and Contemporary Photography

Chicago conceptual photographer Kenneth Josephson (b. 1932) has spent his career scrutinizing photography’s inherent reproducibility and circulation, making use of a mass-cultural archive of images, and mastering self-reflexive, often humorous devices–methods undoubtedly a result of Josephson’s years at the Institute of Design, where as a student he studied under Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. He afterward went on to teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for nearly forty years. Examining Josephson’s production from roughly 1960–1980, Picture Fiction focuses on his four main, ongoing series: Images within Images, Marks and Evidence, History of Photography Series, and Archaeological Series. Largely drawn from the MCA Chicago’s permanent collection, the exhibition reveals concerns shared by Josephson and conceptual artists emerging in the 1960s, and moreover, draws parallels between his practice and contemporary artists.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Picture-Fiction-Kenneth-Josephson-And-Contemporary-Photography

Exhibition: Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow

Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow explores Chicago’s history of robust recognition and early acceptance of self-taught and outsider art and artists. The exhibition presents intrinsic themes embodied in the works of 12 artists, including Chicago icons, Henry Darger, Lee Godie, Joseph Yoakum, and others. Themes found in several artists’ works and represented here include the psychologically-charged tension in oppositions and contradictions; interaction between high style and the vernacular, between nature and culture; drawing on memory and the expressive use of line and form as a survival mechanism; immigration and/or relocation as a defining experience; surviving the African American experience; and the power of portraiture as a view into society, psyche, and soul.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.art.org/chicago-calling-art-against-the-flow