Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Bill Walker: Urban Griot

William “Bill” Walker (1933–2011), was a prolific muralist best known for creating the iconic Wall of Respect on Chicago’s South Side in collaboration with the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC). Urban Griot highlights Walker’s artwork beyond the wall, spanning three series of drawings and several small paintings that he made between 1979 and 1984. The artwork, borrowed from Chicago State University’s collection, is a forceful documentation of the ills of Black urban society that still prevail today.

The exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.hydeparkart.org/exhibition-archive/bill-walker-urban-griot/

Exhibition: William Blake in the Age of Aquarius

William Blake and the Age of Aquarius  considers parallels between English artist and author William Blake’s time and mid-twentieth-century America, touching on such issues as political repression, social transformation, and struggles for civil rights. Blake’s protests against the conventions of his day were inspirational for many young Americans disillusioned by perceived cultural tendencies of social uniformity, materialism and consumerism, racial and gender discrimination, and environmental degradation. This generation sought in Blake a model of independence, imagination, and resistance to authority. The exhibition will feature American artists for whom Blake was an important inspiration and will include more than 130 paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, films, and posters, as well as original Blake prints and illuminated books from collections throughout the United States.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/william-blake-and-the-age-of-aquarius1.html

Exhibition: A Home for Surrealism

A Home for Surrealism offers an in-depth exploration of a select group of painters who planted domestic roots for the surrealist idiom in the 1940s and 1950s. Working in and around Chicago, Gertrude Abercrombie, Dorothea Tanning, John Wilde, Julia Thecla, Harold Noecker, and Julio de Diego interpreted the European movement as something at once more personal and more accessible to its audience. Thematizing the interior while also reconceptualizing ideas of imagination and fantasy, these artists offer tableaus that emphasize the narrative capacities of self and home. While Chicago has long been acknowledged as an important center for the exhibition and collection of European surrealist painting, its own practitioners deserve more widespread recognition. Through their distinct motifs and styles, these artists made surrealism into something that was local to Chicago, even as it acknowledged its international foundations. Working with a team of scholars, The Arts Club, which was on the forefront of introducing surrealism in the 1920s and 30s, offers a focused and revelatory snapshot of Chicago surrealism.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artsclubchicago.org/exhibition/home-for-surrealism/

Exhibition: Sculpting a Chicago Artist: Richard Hunt and his Teachers: Nelli Bar and Egon Weiner

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago cultivated artist Richard Hunt in the 1950s by the guidance of two dynamic teachers. Nelli Bar taught Richard Hunt during his adolescence, and Egon Weiner was his college professor. Bar and Weiner represent the generation of artists who fled Europe after the rise of the Nazi regime and found Chicago as the new home for their artistic ambitions. Both received their education in European academies under prominent teachers during the 1920s. Weiner and Bar produced a new post-war generation of artists, including Richard Hunt. Bar continued to accompany Hunt’s career as he recalls: “She has influenced me as a person over our 30-year relationship.” Hunt remembers Weiner for “his exuberance and nurturing manner – and for being a bundle of energy.” This energy was transmitted to his student Richard Hunt as the Museum of Modern Art purchased one of his sculptures in 1957 just after his graduation and eventually he evolved into one of the most prominent Chicago sculptors and an international master.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.oakton.edu/about/thearts/museum/future_exhibitions/index.php

Exhibition: Picture Fiction: Kenneth Josephson and Contemporary Photography

Chicago conceptual photographer Kenneth Josephson (b. 1932) has spent his career scrutinizing photography’s inherent reproducibility and circulation, making use of a mass-cultural archive of images, and mastering self-reflexive, often humorous devices–methods undoubtedly a result of Josephson’s years at the Institute of Design, where as a student he studied under Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. He afterward went on to teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for nearly forty years. Examining Josephson’s production from roughly 1960–1980, Picture Fiction focuses on his four main, ongoing series: Images within Images, Marks and Evidence, History of Photography Series, and Archaeological Series. Largely drawn from the MCA Chicago’s permanent collection, the exhibition reveals concerns shared by Josephson and conceptual artists emerging in the 1960s, and moreover, draws parallels between his practice and contemporary artists.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Picture-Fiction-Kenneth-Josephson-And-Contemporary-Photography

Exhibition: Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow

Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow explores Chicago’s history of robust recognition and early acceptance of self-taught and outsider art and artists. The exhibition presents intrinsic themes embodied in the works of 12 artists, including Chicago icons, Henry Darger, Lee Godie, Joseph Yoakum, and others. Themes found in several artists’ works and represented here include the psychologically-charged tension in oppositions and contradictions; interaction between high style and the vernacular, between nature and culture; drawing on memory and the expressive use of line and form as a survival mechanism; immigration and/or relocation as a defining experience; surviving the African American experience; and the power of portraiture as a view into society, psyche, and soul.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.art.org/chicago-calling-art-against-the-flow