Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists

Coinciding with the 200th anniversary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819–1900), an important art critic of the Victorian era, the National Gallery has brought together over 90 works, including paintings, watercolors, and drawings, by American artists who were influenced by Ruskin’s writing. Specifically, the exhibition will explore Ruskin’s significant impact on artists associated with a movement called “American Pre-Raphaelitism,” which peaked between 1857 and 1867 and included American artists such as Thomas Charles Farrer (1839–1891), John William Hill (1812–1879), and Robert J. Pattison (1838–1903). The exhibition will showcase the group’s richly detailed figural compositions, landscapes, and still-life paintings.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2019/american-pre-raphaelites-radical-realists.html

Collection Loan: Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present and Future)

From the Terra Foundation Collection, Frederic Edwin Church’s, The Iceberg is exhibited in Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present and Future), organized by University of Colorado’s  CU Art Museum, Boulder, Colorado. This dialogue between American landscape painting and early scientific photography includes historical photographs from the archives of CU Boulder’s National Snow and Ice Data Center. Our Climate (Past, Present, Future) is the second exhibition in the 2018-19 series Documenting Change. The Iceberg will be exhibited  February 7–July 20, 2019.

For more information, please see:

https://www.colorado.edu/cuartmuseum/exhibitions/currently-view/documenting-change-our-climate-rockies

Frederic Edwin Church, The Iceberg, c. 1875, oil on canvas, 22 x 27 in. (55.9 x 68.6cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1993.6
Exhibition: Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan

Organized by the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum in partnership with the Yokohama Museum of Art, Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan focuses on the brief but intense friendship between Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) and Saburo Hasegawa (1906–1957), which was kindled during Noguchi’s visit to Japan in 1950. Both American-born Noguchi and Japanese-born Hasegawa had complex relationships with Japan and the US. Documenting the artists’ exploration of Japanese art, design, and culture, the exhibition will reveal how they interpreted and drew upon these references in their work.

This exhibition was previously at the Yokohama Art Museum.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.noguchi.org/programs/exhibitions/changing-and-unchanging-things-noguchi-and-hasegawa-postwar-japan

Conference: “Counterhistory: Latent and Underground Currents in American Art”

This conference spotlights the ways in which artists, critics, and historians have mobilized critical methods and methodologies against the rising tide of authoritarianism and illiberal populism. Featuring a wide range of projects—from the militant image to secret and clandestine works and networks—the one-day conference aims to articulate new forms in the writing and research in art history. The goal of the event is to rethink the notion of the underground as an evocative terrain for thought and struggle, in particular, the peculiar ways through which images and objects are historically obscured and silenced but emerge, unexpectedly, out of states of latency. The conference seeks to make sense of these forms of delay, resurrection, and survival.

This event is organized by Andrew Witt (2018–20 Terra Foundation Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) and Afonso Dias Ramos (Forum Transregionale Studien, Freie Universität Berlin).

For more information and to register, please visit: https://www.kunstgeschichte.hu-berlin.de/veranstaltungen/symposium-counterhistory-latent-and-underground-currents-in-american-art/

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2019 to December 2019.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Beauford Delaney,untitled (Village Street Scene), 1948. Oil on canvas, Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2018.2
Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan for 18 months to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 to the Summer of 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99
Conference: “Arts Patronage in Modern America”

This interdisciplinary conference will feature papers by emerging and established scholars from around the world whose work addresses US arts patronage from the early twentieth century to the present day.

Two plenaries, by John R. Blakinger (Terra Foundation Visiting Professor of American Art, University of Oxford) and Mary Anne Goley (Founding Director of the Fine Arts Program, US Federal Reserve), are free and open to the public. To register, please visit: https://americanartspatronage.com/registration/.

For more information and to view the full program, please visit: https://americanartspatronage.com/

Workshop: Fellowship & Publishing Opportunities at the Smithsonian Institution

This workshop with Amelia Goerlitz (Chair of Academic Programs, Smithsonian American Art Museum) will offer an overview of Smithsonian residential fellowships available to pre- and postdoctoral scholars of American art and visual culture. Attendees will learn how to apply for art history and American studies fellowships in the US, and best practices for submitting their work to the Institution’s scholarly journals.

For more information and to download the poster, please visit: https://live-terraamericanart.pantheonsite.io/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Terra-SAAM-Workshop-at-JFKI.pdf.

Conference: “1898: Imag(in)ing the Caribbean in the Age of the Spanish-American War”

This interdisciplinary conference will address visual representations produced in the wake of the Spanish-American War—an understudied yet pivotal conflict in the history of the United States and its relation to the world. While the war only lasted four months, the consequences were profound. The US military seized four colonies from Spain (Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Philippines, and Guam), signaling the end of the vast Spanish Empire and the beginning of American imperial ambition in what would come to be called “The American Century.” (Even during the conflict, the US military, at the urging of President William McKinley, had annexed the independent republic of Hawaii.)

The conference will focus on the Caribbean, illuminating Puerto Rico and Cuba, which represent very different trajectories in the United States’ “first episode in globalization.” Puerto Rico’s ambiguous legal status and lack of sovereignty as an unincorporated US territory continues to fuel critical debates about the island’s identity as a commonwealth, future US state, or an independent nation. Puerto Ricans continue to fight for both greater autonomy and for full rights as US citizens—a dual struggle thrown into sharp relief by crippling debt and by a devastating 2017 hurricane. Cuba, by contrast, a US protectorate for only three years, has since the 1959 communist revolution stood in stark defiance against US power and influence.

Situating their talks in the era of the war and its aftermath, scholars will explore the ways that paintings, sculptures, photographs, architecture, tourist postcards, sheet music, and ethnological and historical artifacts (created and collected by both islanders and mainlanders, locals and outsiders), have pictured, documented, negotiated, critiqued, and resisted that new world order. Speakers will draw on art history, museum theory, anthropology, post-colonial studies, and American and Latin American studies to interpret the work of artists, designers, collectors, and travelers. They will demonstrate how the acquisition, classification, publication, circulation, and display of such material culture has constructed powerful narratives that have shaped popular and often problematic perceptions of Puerto Rico and Cuba, which Puerto Rican poet Lola Rodríquez de Tío called “two wings of one bird.” Speakers will also consider 1898 from the lens of the current political, economic, and environmental crises on both islands, as well as from contemporary diaspora perspectives.

The conference is organized by Laura Katzman, 2018–19 Terra Foundation Visiting Professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin. It is supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Culture Department of the JFKI/FU.

This event will be held in Room 340 at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies. For more information, please visit: https://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/en/faculty/culture/dates/2019-Terra-Katzman.html

Workshop: Fellowship & Publishing Opportunities at the Smithsonian Institution

This workshop with Amelia Goerlitz (Chair of Academic Programs, Smithsonian American Art Museum) will offer an overview of Smithsonian residential fellowships available to pre- and postdoctoral scholars of American art and visual culture. Attendees will learn how to apply for art history and American studies fellowships in the US, and best practices for submitting their work to the Institution’s scholarly journals.

For more information and to download the poster, please visit: https://live-terraamericanart.pantheonsite.io/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Courtauld-Workshop.pdf.