Terra Foundation-supported Events

Colloquium: “The Black Metropolis, Between Past and Future: Race, Urban Planning, and Afro-American Culture in Chicago”

This colloquium seeks to reevaluate the cultural contributions of artists and designers from the South and West Sides of Chicago in defining an African American identity nationally. By doing so, it will strive to demonstrate the particularities of the Black Chicago Renaissance as distinct from the Harlem Renaissance. This multidisciplinary event spans the domains of sociology, history, and art history from the 1920s to the present. It is organized by the University of Chicago Center in Paris in partnership with the Université Paris Diderot, the Fondation des États-Unis, and the Institut d’études politiques de Paris (Sciences Po); with the support of the Université Paris-Sorbonne. It will be hosted in multiple locations.

 The program is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

Exhibitions, documentary screenings, and a performance will take place in connection with the colloquium. For the complete program, locations, and associated events, please click here.

Dialogue: “Women Inside and Outside the Grid: New Approaches to Modernist Sculpture”

Recent attention to American women sculptors of the 1960s and 1970s has significantly extended the parameters of thinking about high-modernist sculpture and minimalist aesthetics in general. New work has come to the foreground, and interpretation has shifted. For example, the exhibition Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, held at the Museum of Modern Art in the summer of 2017, engages the work of Lee Bontecou, Anne Truitt, Louise Bourgeois, and many others. Readings of this form of sculpture, claiming gender as a multivalent and unstable sign, put into question the rhetoric of immediacy, unity, and power that has been associated with the art of this period, in particular by artist Donald Judd and critics Clement Greenberg and Michael Fried. Going beyond the pioneering feminist criticism of Lucy Lippard, Annette Michelson, and Barbara Rose, these studies unsettle sharp oppositions between attributes that are supposedly masculine and others more commonly equated with feminist artistic language, especially in the cases of Truitt and Bontecou. Equally important in this revisionist rewriting is the close examination of the temporal dimension characterizing many of these works. Participants are invited to look at modernist sculpture again, perhaps in a richer and more subtle manner than before.

Speakers:

  • Jo Applin, Professor of Art History, The Courtauld Institute of Art
  • Miguel de Baca, Associate Professor of Art History, Lake Forest College and Terra Foundation Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held in English. Please RSVP by November 13 to:
[email protected]

Seminar: “Graphic Design: between Negation and Affirmation in Container Corporation’s Great Ideas Advertising Series, c. 1950-1980” by Lara Allison

Lara Allison, Lecturer in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will examine the relationship between Abstract Expressionism, European modernism, and Pop Art in Walter Paepcke’s The Great Ideas of Western Man advertising campaign, founded in 1950. Michael Golec, Assistant Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will moderate the discussion.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://newberry.org/11162017-lara-allison-school-art-institute-chicago

Lecture: “Painting the Black Gospel” at the Chicago Humanities Festival

In her 2016 publication Painting the Gospel: Black Public Art and Religion in Chicago, art historian Kymberly Pinder provides a fascinating survey of some of the stunning religious iconography central to black belief, worship, and resistance. Beginning with images of black-Christ in key Chicago churches, Pinder explores murals, sculpture, and even t-shirts, including works by William Walker, Richard Hunt, and Damon Lamar Reed. Along the way she uncovers how and why African-American faith communities have remade religion in their own images.

This lecture is presented by the Chicago Humanities Festival as part of Fallfest/17: Belief.

For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit: https://tickets.chicagohumanities.org/shows/805%20-%20painting%20the%20black%20gospel/events

Lecture: “The Revolutionary Art of John Singleton Copley” at the Chicago Humanities Festival

One of the clearest windows into the complexities of America’s revolutionary period can be found through its paintings. In her prize–winning book, A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley, Harvard University professor Jane Kamensky dives into the life and times of a man who was both colonial America’s premier painter and a British loyalist, whose art and letters reveal what she deems an “unheroic, sometimes anti–heroic” man. Join the unofficial “American historian laureate” for a conversation about how revolutionary upheaval shaped Copley’s life, world, and work, and how Copley’s life in turn reshapes our understanding of the American Revolution.

This lecture is presented by the Chicago Humanities Festival as part of Fallfest/17: Belief.

For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit: https://tickets.chicagohumanities.org/shows/802%20-%20the%20revolutionary%20art%20of%20john%20singleton%20copley/events

Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: Daniel J. Terra Gallery Installation

Since 2014, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to Musée des Impressionnismes Giverny.  Works form the Terra Foundation Collection are on display in a gallery dedicated to Daniel J. Terra. The gallery places a focus on the rich impressionist legacy of Giverny and its surrounds.  This installation features five works from the Terra Foundation Collection:

This installation is on view March 25th to November 6th, 2016; March 24th to November 2017; and March to November 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mdig.fr/en

John Leslie Breck, Morning and Fog, 1892, oil on canvas, 32 x 46 3/16 in. (81.3 x 117.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.19
Symposium: “Transforming Culture and Society: Midwest Women Artists, 1960s-1980s”

The 1960s, ‘70s, and ‘80s were a period of great cultural, political, economic and technological change in the United States.  Artists recognized the power their work could have to raise public awareness of social and political issues, and to effect change. Many women artists challenged mainstream modernism in ways that precipitated fundamental changes in the art world and beyond. Their stories, especially those of Midwestern female artists, are still not well documented or widely known. The 2017 Midwest Women Artists Symposium, Transforming Culture and Society: Midwest Women Artists, 1960s-1980s, explores the social issues and subject matter that Midwestern women artists of the period addressed in their work, as well as their impact on their communities through the organizations they formed to exhibit and promote their creative activities.

This symposium is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://iwa.bradley.edu/symposium

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2017 to December 2017.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

George Bellows, The Palisades, 1909. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.10
Exhibition: Peter Hujar: Speed of Life

New York-based photographer Peter Hujar (1934–1987) is best known for his downtown nightscapes, erotic nudes, portraits of the city’s notable literati, and images of underground gay nightlife. This exhibition will consider the artist’s career, from his apprenticeship in magazine and fashion work in the 1950s and the “radical chic” city of the late 1960s, to the age of AIDS, a disease from which he died in 1987. This exhibition will draw on approximately 150 photographs from across the artist’s career to present his rich, nuanced oeuvre and distinct worldview.

This exhibition is also on view at Fundacion Mapfre, Barcelona, Spain, (January 1–May 20, 2017), the Morgan Library and Museum, New York (January 26–May 20, 2018), and the Berkeley Art Center, Berkeley, California (July 11–October 7, 2018).

For more information, please visit:
http://www.fotomuseumdenhaag.nl/en/exhibitions/peter-hujar

 

 

Conference: “In and Out of American Art: Between Provincialism and Transnationalism, 1940–80”

This conference will reassess how artists and art professionals negotiated the formidable reputation of American art, both within the US and internationally, between the years 1940 and 1980. During these decades the prestige of the US art world—for which “New York” functioned as a synecdoche— was understood to enjoy a global reach. Speakers seek to explore how artists moving in and out of the art worlds of American art during this period engaged with the power complex of provincialism, in the light of the current research emphasis on artistic transnational exchange.

Registration is free, but please email the organizers at inandoutofamericanart (at) gmail.com to confirm your place.

For more information, please visit:
https://inandoutofamericanart.wordpress.com/