Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Sculpting a Chicago Artist: Richard Hunt and his Teachers: Nelli Bar and Egon Weiner

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago cultivated artist Richard Hunt in the 1950s by the guidance of two dynamic teachers. Nelli Bar taught Richard Hunt during his adolescence, and Egon Weiner was his college professor. Bar and Weiner represent the generation of artists who fled Europe after the rise of the Nazi regime and found Chicago as the new home for their artistic ambitions. Both received their education in European academies under prominent teachers during the 1920s. Weiner and Bar produced a new post-war generation of artists, including Richard Hunt. Bar continued to accompany Hunt’s career as he recalls: “She has influenced me as a person over our 30-year relationship.” Hunt remembers Weiner for “his exuberance and nurturing manner – and for being a bundle of energy.” This energy was transmitted to his student Richard Hunt as the Museum of Modern Art purchased one of his sculptures in 1957 just after his graduation and eventually he evolved into one of the most prominent Chicago sculptors and an international master.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.oakton.edu/about/thearts/museum/future_exhibitions/index.php

Exhibition: A Home for Surrealism

A Home for Surrealism offers an in-depth exploration of a select group of painters who planted domestic roots for the surrealist idiom in the 1940s and 1950s. Working in and around Chicago, Gertrude Abercrombie, Dorothea Tanning, John Wilde, Julia Thecla, Harold Noecker, and Julio de Diego interpreted the European movement as something at once more personal and more accessible to its audience. Thematizing the interior while also reconceptualizing ideas of imagination and fantasy, these artists offer tableaus that emphasize the narrative capacities of self and home. While Chicago has long been acknowledged as an important center for the exhibition and collection of European surrealist painting, its own practitioners deserve more widespread recognition. Through their distinct motifs and styles, these artists made surrealism into something that was local to Chicago, even as it acknowledged its international foundations. Working with a team of scholars, The Arts Club, which was on the forefront of introducing surrealism in the 1920s and 30s, offers a focused and revelatory snapshot of Chicago surrealism.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artsclubchicago.org/exhibition/home-for-surrealism/

Exhibition: Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen

Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen is the first major survey of the work of the groundbreaking, multidisciplinary artist. The exhibition spans Pindell’s five-decades-long career, featuring early figurative paintings, pure abstraction and conceptual works, and personal and political art. Trained as a painter, Pindell has challenged art world traditions and asserted her place in its history as a woman and one of African descent. The exhibition also highlights Pindell’s work with photography, film, and performance.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Howardena-Pindell

Seminar: “Will Bradley’s Art of Art Direction” by Jennifer Greenhill

Jennifer Greenhill, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Southern California, will presents a work-in-progress on graphic artist Will Bradley (1868-1962). Specifically, Greenhill will go beyond Bradley’s well-known contributions to magazine covers and advertisements in publications such as The Inland Printer and The Chap-Book. Greenhill will instead focus on the profound, but under-explored, impact Bradley made on American design in his role as art director for properties owned by William Randolph Hearst. Commissioning art, revamping layouts, and so on, Bradley shaped the look of the popular magazine at a key moment in its history when an influx of advertising revenue and advances in printing technologies made magazines an attractive artistic outlet. Overall, Greenhill aims to not only to piece together these understudied aspects of Bradley’s output but to also offer a fuller picture of Bradley’s significance to the history of design.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/04262018-jennifer-greenhill-university-southern-california

Exhibition: Bill Walker: Urban Griot

William “Bill” Walker (1933–2011), was a prolific muralist best known for creating the iconic Wall of Respect on Chicago’s South Side in collaboration with the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC). Urban Griot highlights Walker’s artwork beyond the wall, spanning three series of drawings and several small paintings that he made between 1979 and 1984. The artwork, borrowed from Chicago State University’s collection, is a forceful documentation of the ills of Black urban society that still prevail today.

The exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.hydeparkart.org/exhibition-archive/bill-walker-urban-griot/

Exhibition: Barbara Jones-Hogu: Resist, Relate, Unite 1968–1975

Chicago-based artist Barbara Jones-Hogu was a central figure of the Black Arts Movement and a founding member of the African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists (AfriCOBRA). Throughout her career she has worked in painting, printmaking, film, education, and has contributed to major projects including Chicago’s Wall of Respect mural. This is her first solo museum exhibition and features works on paper including woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, and screenprints.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://museums.depaul.edu/exhibitions/upcoming/

Exhibition: William Blake in the Age of Aquarius

William Blake and the Age of Aquarius  considers parallels between English artist and author William Blake’s time and mid-twentieth-century America, touching on such issues as political repression, social transformation, and struggles for civil rights. Blake’s protests against the conventions of his day were inspirational for many young Americans disillusioned by perceived cultural tendencies of social uniformity, materialism and consumerism, racial and gender discrimination, and environmental degradation. This generation sought in Blake a model of independence, imagination, and resistance to authority. The exhibition will feature American artists for whom Blake was an important inspiration and will include more than 130 paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, films, and posters, as well as original Blake prints and illuminated books from collections throughout the United States.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/william-blake-and-the-age-of-aquarius1.html

Exhibition: Procession: The Art of Norman Lewis

This exhibition marks the first comprehensive overview of the art of Norman Lewis: a participant in the Harlem art community, an innovator of Abstract Expressionism and a politically-conscious activist. Covering the 1930s to 1970s, the 60 paintings and works on paper revolve chronologically and thematically around six motifs: In the City, Visual Sound, Rhythm of Nature, Ritual, Civil Rights and Summation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dca/supp_info/norman_lewis.html

Exhibition: László Moholy-Nagy: Future Present

Co-organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Future Present is the first comprehensive retrospective of Moholy-Nagy’s work in the United States in nearly 50 years. The exhibition brings together more than 300 works to survey the career of this multimedia artist. Moholy, as he was known, came to prominence as a professor at the Bauhaus art school in Germany (1923–28). In 1937 he founded the New Bauhaus in Chicago, a school that continues today as the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

This exhibition is also on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (February 12–June 18, 2017).

For more information, please visit: http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/are-you-modern-moholy-nagy

Exhibition: A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant-Garde, 1960s–1980s

This exhibition examines the creative activities and legacy of Charlotte Moorman, whose contributions as a visual artist, performance artist, musician, and advocate for the artistic avant-garde of the 1960s and ’70s in the United States and Europe have yet to find their place in scholarship or popular history. The exhibition features approximately 100 objects, ranging from original sculptures, photographs, video art works, recreated installation and performance art works, to annotated music scores, archival materials, film clips, and audio recordings.

The exhibition is also on view at Grey Art Gallery, New York University (fall 2016), and the Museum der Moderne Salzburg (spring 2017).

For more information, please visit:
http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/a-feast-of-astonishments-charlotte-moorman-and-the-avant-garde,-1960s1980s.html