Terra Foundation-supported Events

Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan  to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 through 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99
Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.
This installation is ongoing, January 2020 to December 2020.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artic.edu/

Fitz Henry Lane, Brace’s Rock, Brace’s Cove, 1864, oil on canvas, 10 1/4 x 15 1/4 in. (26.0 x 38.7 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.83
Online Dialogue: “Walker Evans and Renewals of American Documentary”

In this dialogue organized by the Terra Foundation, Stephanie Schwartz (Associate Professor in American Art, University College London) and Quentin Bajac (Director, Jeu de Paume) will address the legacy of Walker Evans (1903–75) and the renewals of American documentary from the 1960s to the present.

Expanding from her recently published book Walker Evans: No Politics (University of Texas Press, 2020), Stephanie Schwartz will take up the issue of “remakes” as concerns both how the photographer revisited his work throughout his long career, as well as how Evans and documentary reemerged in the 1960s and 1970s through the work of Allan Sekula (1951–2013). Schwartz will address the multiple temporalities of documentary and influence.

Quentin Bajac, curator of the survey exhibition Stephen Shore (Museum of Modern Art, 2017–18), will focus on the fascination that Shore (b. 1947) has always had for Evans’s work. “If I were to say in the photographic world the one person whom I used as a springboard for ideas and a resource to learn from, it was Walker Evans,” Shore asserted in the New York Times in 2004. More than an influence, Shore prefers to characterize his relationship with Evans in another vein, closer to a sentiment (“a kinship”) or a way of being (“the same constitutional type”). Bajac will address the many different facets that this relationship has taken throughout Shore’s career.

Together, the speakers will address and trouble the issue of “influence,” querying what it means for photography and its histories and thinking about the larger question of what Evans and American documentary might mean today.

This event will be held online in English. It is scheduled for 6–7:15 p.m. in Paris (GMT +1), including time for a Q&A with the speakers after their presentations. Reservation is required: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/4516021673826/WN_KdNDlgC8Qp6IYIlM8oqGhA.

Walker Evans, Houses. Atlanta, Georgia, March 1936. Nitrate negative, 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm), Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives, LC-USF342- 008057-A [P&P] LOT 1538
Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 through 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99