Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: American Masters

This exhibition tells the story of the formation of the National Gallery of Australia’s  American collection. From Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Pop, Neo-Dada and Photo-Realism, to Conceptual, Land and Performance Art, American Masters examines how a generation of young Americans challenged local traditions and reinvented modern art, inspired by European émigrés including Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse, Piet Mondrian and Josef Albers. The international impact of major American artists between the 1940s and 1980s is captured in masterworks by Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Chuck Close, Donald Judd, Eva Hesse and Louise Bourgeois. Highlights include paintings and works on paper by artists of the New York School and a selection of light works by Dan Flavin, Bruce Nauman, Keith Sonnier and James Turrell.

For more information, please visit: 
https://nga.gov.au/americanmasters/default.cfm

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

William Stanley Haseltine, Rocks at Nahant, 1864, oil on canvas, 22 3/8 x 40 1/2in. (56.8 x 102.9cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.65
Exhibition: Todros Geller: Strange Worlds

Todros Geller: Strange Worlds focuses on the multifaceted oeuvre of Todros Geller (1889–1949), an influential Chicago artist and central figure in the history of modern American Jewish art. Born in Ukraine, Geller immigrated to Chicago in 1918, which remained his home until his death. An active proponent of the concept of Jewish art, he served as a mentor to numerous Chicago Jewish artists and as a prominent educator, first as a teacher at the Jewish People’s Institute and Jane Addams Hull House, then as supervisor of art for the College of Jewish Studies (later Spertus Institute) and acting director of The Jewish Museum in Chicago. In both work and life, Geller reflected the prevailing social, political, and artistic concerns of his time, while remaining intimately entwined with Chicago’s evolving Jewish community and its efforts to establish, maintain, and promote Jewish identity.

This exhibition draws from the unique holdings from the Spertus Institute’s collection to survey the broad scope of Geller’s creative endeavors. In addition to a broad range of paintings, prints, and works on paper, the collection includes an extensive archive of Geller’s personal materials, encompassing preparatory sketches, letters, books, postcards, periodicals, news articles, photographs, posters, book illustrations, and bookplates. Todros Geller: Strange Worlds draws on these unique resources—the majority on view for the first time—to examine the public and private concerns that animated Geller’s work throughout his career.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.spertus.edu/exhibitions/strange-worlds

Seminar: “A Threat to Human Scale: The Eames Office’s Tandem Seating System for Chicago’s O’Hare Airport (1962)” by Michael Golec

Michael Golec, Associate Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will discuss how Charles Eames incorporated the notion of “human scale” into his design approach for Chicago’s O’Hare Airport in the early 1960s.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/09062018-michael-golec-school-art-institute-chicago

Exhibition: 3–D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980

3-D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980 examines the little-known sculptural work and dimensional painting made by the Chicago Imagists during the early years of their practice. As the first in-depth exploration of the overall affinity of Imagist artists for objects, the exhibition features artists who worked individually to craft unique approaches, but who shared key influences, such as Surrealism and the Surrealist objects. In addition to members of the original Imagist groups, the exhibition includes work by Don Baum, the chief curator of the Imagist moment; Ray Yoshida, the teacher with whom many Imagists studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; as well as H.C. Westermann, arguably the point of origin for the exhibition.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://tang.skidmore.edu/exhibitions/238-3-d-doings-the-imagist-object-in-chicago-art-1964-1980

Exhibition: South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980

During the 1960s and 1970s, Chicago was shaped by art and ideas produced and circulated on the South Side. Yet the history of the period’s creative and social ferment has often remained segregated by the city’s social, political, and geographic divides. South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980—organized by the Smart Museum in collaboration with the DuSable Museum of African American History and presented concurrently with South Side Stories: Holdings at the DuSable—takes a nuanced look at the cultural history of Chicago’s South Side during this momentous era of change and conflict, with a focus on artists of the Black Arts Movement. Through nearly 100 objects, the show upends dominant narratives of the period and unearths rich stories by examining watershed cultural moments from the Hairy Who to the Wall of Respect, from the Civil Rights movement to the AfriCOBRA, from vivid protest posters to visionary outsider art, and from the Free University movement to the radical jazz of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/south-side-stories-rethinking-chicago-art/

Exhibition: Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago

Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago examines and illuminates the distinctive vein of industrial films which Chicago became known for in the 1950s and 1960s, and their compelling relationship to more avant-garde film experiments produced by the same artists and designers, including, most prominently, Morton and Millie Goldsholl and their firm Goldsholl and Associates. The Goldsholls were part of a generation of designers that emerged from the Institute of Design, where László Moholy-Nagy famously fostered a curriculum of aesthetic experimentation and social engagement. The Goldsholls’ innovative integration of film with other forms of visual production such as print advertising and brand development placed them at the forefront of their peers in design, and the wider community of filmmakers in Chicago. Designers in Film is the first exhibition to focus on the relationship between film and mid-twentieth century art and design in Chicago, and to study this history as a particular outgrowth of the city’s social, artistic, and political climate. The exhibition features highly inventive moving images alongside materials related to their creation, ranging from designed objects to drawings, print advertisements, photographs, and other ephemera.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/designers-in-film.html

Exhibition/Collection Loan: Americans Abroad: Landscape and Artistic Exchange, 1800-1920

Organized by the Eskenazi Museum of Art, at Indiana University, Bloomington, and the Tsinghua University Art Museum, Americans Abroad: Landscape and Artistic Exchange, 1800–1920 showcases American and European paintings dating from the late eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century to address the affinities and influences between American and European art.

Included in the exhibition are seven works from the Terra Foundation collection:

For more information, please visit:
http://www.artmuseum.tsinghua.edu.cn/en/cpsj_english/zlxx/zzzl/lszl/

Lyonel Feininger, Denstedt, 1917, Oil on canvas, 34 3/8 x 46 5/8 in. (87.3 x 118.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1988.27
Dialogue: “Dorothea Lange, photographe documentaire”

Ahead of the opening of Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing at the Jeu de Paume (October 16, 2018–January 27, 2019), this discussion between Abigail Solomon-Godeau, professor emerita at the University of California, Santa Barbara and author of multiple publications on photography, and Pia Viewing, co-curator of the exhibition, will shed light on Dorothea Lange’s socially engaged work made during the Great Depression and World War II in the United States.

From 1935 to 1939, Lange captured the plight of workers fleeing the Dust Bowl, when draught devastated the Midwest and its agricultural production, creating images that have since become icons of US photographic history. During the 1940s, she documented the internment of Japanese Americans and the migration of laborers who contributed to the war effort at the Richmond, CA shipyards. Dorothea Lange’s commitment to such subjects offers valuable insight on this period in US history, when fundamental changes marked the social evolution of the country.

Held as part of the annual Semaine des cultures étrangères, organized by the Forum des instituts culturels étrangers à Paris (FICEP).

This event is free and open to the public. It will be held in French. Please RSVP by September 24 to: [email protected] or +33 1 43 20 67 01.

Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: Pathways to Modernism: American Art, 1865–1945

Pathways to Modernism: American Art, 1865–1945 is the first major collaboration between the Art Institute of Chicago and the Terra Foundation for American Art. Featuring 78 paintings and works on paper, this thematic exhibition explores the many paths by which American art became modern through its engagement with the political, economic, and cultural developments that transformed the nature of daily life, as well as modes of art making during this tumultuous period.

Pathways to Modernism includes 43 works from the Terra Foundation collection by artists such as Frederic Edwin Church, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Theodore Robinson, William Merritt Chase, Arthur Dove, Helen Torr, Charles Demuth, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Edward Hopper.

Pathways to Modernism will be accompanied by public programming and an exhibition catalogue published in Chinese and English.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.shanghaimuseum.net/museum/frontend/en/display/exhibition-info-out-line.action

Edward Hopper, Dawn in Pennsylvania, 1942. Oil on canvas, 24 3/8 x 44 1/4 in. (61.9 x 112.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.77
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

William Stanley Haseltine, Rocks at Nahant, 1864, oil on canvas, 22 3/8 x 40 1/2in. (56.8 x 102.9cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.65
Exhibition: Anni Albers

Co-organized by the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and the Tate Modern, London, Anni Albers showcases the multifaceted weaver’s long career. Albers (1899–1994) studied during the 1920s at the Bauhaus School. After emigrating to the United States, with her husband Josef Albers, she taught at Black Mountain College. At the center of her creative achievement are her woven images, characterized by complex textile structures, abstraction, and subtle coloration.

The exhibition is also on view at K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf (June 9–September 9, 2019)

More information is forthcoming.

Collection Loan: Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment

The exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment explores ecological themes including Industrialization and environmental conservation, as well as shifts in American landscape painting. From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight and Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm.  Organized by  Princeton University Art Museum, this exhibition is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum, October 13, 2018–January 6, 2019; Peabody Essex Museum, February 2, 2019–May 5, 2019; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, May 25, 2019–September 9, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

http://artmuseum.princeton.edu/art/exhibitions/2818

 

Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight, 1866. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.57
Exhibition/Collection Loan: John Singer Sargent

The exhibition John Singer Sargent explores Sargent’s relationship with Scandinavian art around 1900, including society portraits, as well as portraits of children, artists and friends, landscapes, and genre scenes. From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Parisian Beggar Girl, c. 1880 is exhibited. Noted in the provenance,  the painting  Parisian Beggar Girl was a gift from Sargent to Albert Edelfelt, a Finnish painter also included in the exhibition.  With the re-opening of the Nationalmuseum in October, the exhibition John Singer Sargent is on view at Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden, October 13, 2018-January 13, 2019.

For more information, please see:

https://www.nationalmuseum.se/en/utst%C3%A4llningar/kommande-utst%C3%A4llningar/john-singer-sargent

John Singer Sargent, A Parisian Beggar Girl, c. 1880, oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 17 3/16 in. (64.5 x 43.7 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.14
Seminar: “The Open Plan Office in the Windy City” by Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler

In the late 1960s, the open plan office concept challenged conventional office planning by radically reimagining the office as a space that could reduce hierarchy, increase communication, and support organizational change. Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler, Assistant Professor of Design History at Purdue University, will argue that the city of Chicago was a vital nexus of activity in the earliest promotion and experimentation of the open plan office concept.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/10182018-jennifer-kaufmann-buhler-purdue-university

Exhibition: Chicago New Media 1973–1992

Chicago New Media 1973–1992 seeks to illuminate the largely untold story of Chicago’s role in the history of new media. Consisting of an exhibition, public program, and scholarly catalog, the project yields a new art historical understanding of the artists and organizations that contributed to digital art and technology in the latter half of the 20th century.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.videogameartgallery.com/events/2018/11/1/chicago-new-media-19731992

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

William Stanley Haseltine, Rocks at Nahant, 1864, oil on canvas, 22 3/8 x 40 1/2in. (56.8 x 102.9cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.65
Collection Loan: Once upon a Time in America: Three Centuries of US American Art

This large survey exhibition is dedicated to US American art from 1650 to 1950. The show begins with works extending from the colonial era to the masters of American Realism, and ends with examples of Abstract Expressionism. For its exhibition Once Upon a Time in America, the Wallraf is bringing to Cologne over 120 loans from the most celebrated collections and museums in the United States and Europe. The majority have never or only rarely be seen in Germany.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.wallraf.museum/en/exhibitions/preview/2018-11-13-amerika/

Collection Loan: Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment

The exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment explores ecological themes including Industrialization and environmental conservation, as well as shifts in American landscape painting. From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight and Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm.  Organized by  Princeton University Art Museum, this exhibition is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum, October 13, 2018–January 6, 2019; Peabody Essex Museum, February 2, 2019–May 5, 2019; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, May 25, 2019–September 9, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.pem.org/

 

Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight, 1866. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.57
Exhibition / Terra Collection Initiative: Atelier 17 and Printmaking in Brazil and the United States, 1900-1950

Co-organized by Museu De Arte Contemporânea da Universidade de São Paulo (MAC-USP), and the Terra Foundation for American Art, this exhibition will be the first presentation of the collection of modern American prints donated by Nelson Rockefeller in 1950, and American prints donated by the collector Lessing J. Rosenwald in 1956.   Atelier 17 and Printmaking in Brazil and the United States, 1900-1950 includes early twentieth-century American prints, contextualized with modern prints by Brazilian artists such as Geraldo de Barros, Fayga Ostrower, and Livio Abramo who had direct ties to Atelier 17.  The exhibition examines the intricate network of international exchange between artists, curators, collectors, and audiences in Brazil and the United States.

Works from the Terra Foundation for American Art:

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mac.usp.br/mac/conteudo/exp/atuais/masterpager.asp

 

Stanley William Hayter, Cinq Personnages, 1946. Engraving, soft-ground etching and scorper, silkscreen (printed in three colors: orange, turquoise-green and red-violet) on thick Kochi paper, Plate: 14 3/4 x 23 7/8 in. (37.5 x 60.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1995.37
Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: Daniel J. Terra Gallery Installation

Since 2014, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to Musée des Impressionnismes Giverny.  Works form the Terra Foundation Collection are on display in a gallery dedicated to Daniel J. Terra. The gallery places a focus on the rich impressionist legacy of Giverny and its surrounds.  This installation features five works from the Terra Foundation Collection:

This installation is on view March 29–November 3, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mdig.fr/en

John Leslie Breck, Morning and Fog, 1892, oil on canvas, 32 x 46 3/16 in. (81.3 x 117.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.19
Collection Loan: Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment 

The exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment explores ecological themes including Industrialization and environmental conservation, as well as shifts in American landscape painting. From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight and Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm.  Organized by  Princeton University Art Museum, this exhibition is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum, October 13, 2018–January 6, 2019; Peabody Essex Museum, February 2, 2019–May 5, 2019; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, May 25, 2019–September 9, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

https://crystalbridges.org

Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight, 1866. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.57