Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen

Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen is the first major survey of the work of the groundbreaking, multidisciplinary artist. The exhibition spans Pindell’s five-decades-long career, featuring early figurative paintings, pure abstraction and conceptual works, and personal and political art. Trained as a painter, Pindell has challenged art world traditions and asserted her place in its history as a woman and one of African descent. The exhibition also highlights Pindell’s work with photography, film, and performance.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Howardena-Pindell

Exhibition/Collection Loan: Coming Away: Winslow Homer in England

Developed around two iconic Homer paintings—the Worcester Art Museum’s The Gale (1883–93) and the Milwaukee Art Museum’s Hark! The Lark (1882)—the exhibition Coming Away: Winslow Homer and England explores the artist’s time in Cullercoats, England, in 1881 and 1882. Jointly coordinated by Worcester and Milwaukee, the exhibition features the most comprehensive group of oils made during or emerging directly from Homer’s time abroad. Shown alongside comparative paintings by English artists, these works complicate our understanding of Homer’s art as purely American in subject and style.  From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Winslow Homer’s Perils of the Sea and The Nurse are exhibited.

This exhibition is also on view at the Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, Massachusetts (November 11, 2017–February 4, 2018).

For more information please visit:
http://mam.org/exhibitions/

 

Winslow Homer, The Nurse, 1867, oil on panel, 19 x 11 in. (48.3 x 27.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.74
Collection Loan: Mary Cassatt: Une impressionniste américaine à Paris (Mary Cassatt: An American Impressionist in Paris)

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Mary Cassatt’s Summertime and Jenny and her Sleepy Child are exhibited in Mary Cassatt: An American Impressionist in Paris. This exhibition is jointly raised by US curator Dr. Nancy Mowll Mathews, Eugénie Prendergast Senior Curator and Lecturer, Emerita from Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts and in France, by Pierre Curie , director of the Revue de l’Art, chief curator of heritage, and curator of the Musée Jacquemart-André.  The exhibition is on view at the Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris, France, March 9–July 23, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com/en/mary-cassatt

 

Mary Cassatt, Summertime, 1894, oil on canvas, 39 5/8 x 32 in. (100.6 x 81.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1988.25
Exhibition: Robert Smithson: Time Crystals

Robert Smithson: Time Crystals is the first exhibition in Australia dedicated to the artist. Best known for his radical land art of the 1960s and early 1970s, Smithson is now widely recognized as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Inspired by ideas of crystalline geometry and non-biological time, he redefined abstraction and challenged art history.

Featuring new research on the artist’s practice, Time Crystals presents sculpture, photography, film, drawings, and texts borrowed from major Australian and international collections. It also includes the most extensive display of Smithson’s manuscript and archival material to date drawn from the Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt Papers at the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art.

This exhibition will also be on view at the Monash University Museum of Art. Details are forthcoming.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.artmuseum.uq.edu.au/

Exhibition: The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766–1820

This exhibition reunites an extraordinary collection of paintings, portraits, and prints; mineral, plant, and animal specimens; scientific instruments; American Indian artifacts; and relics from the ancient world. Originally assembled in the Philosophy Chamber, an ornately decorated room devoted to the discipline of natural philosophy, this early teaching collection at Harvard College was founded in 1766. Artists, scientists, students, and advocates of American Independence—John Singleton Copley, John Trumbull, George Washington, John Adams, and James Monroe, among others—came to the Philosophy Chamber to discover and disseminate new knowledge. The collection and the chamber played a vital role in teaching and research at Harvard, while also serving as the center of artistic and intellectual life in the greater New England region for more than 50 years.

The exhibition is also on view at Harvard Art Museums (May 15, 2017).

More information is forthcoming.

Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: America’s Cool Modernism: O’Keeffe to Hopper

America’s Cool Modernism: O’Keeffe to Hopper, a  Terra Collection Initiative, is co-organized by the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford.

The exhibition of paintings, prints, and photographs features 27 works from the Terra Foundation Collection including:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, is lending 18 paintings. Additional works in the exhibition are lent from US museums and private collections.  Many of the artworks have never been exhibited in the UK before.  America’s Cool Modernism: O’Keeffe to Hopper is accompanied by an exhibition catalogue.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.ashmolean.org/americascoolmodernism

Edward Hopper, Dawn in Pennsylvania, 1942, oil on canvas, 24 3/8 x 44 1/4 in. (61.9 x 112.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.77
Conference: “Experience and American Art”

What does it mean to experience a work of art? What does it mean for a work of art to register—even enact—an experience? Would it be possible for an art historian working now, in experiencing a work of art, to sense some aspect of lived experience from another time, another place?

Organized by:

  • Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University
  • David Peters Corbett, Professor of American Art and Director, Centre for American Art, The Courtauld Institute of Art

For a complete listing of the events organized by the Centre for American Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art, please visit their website.

For more information and to consult the full conference program, please visit:
https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/experience-american-art.

Dialogue: “A Conflicted Geography: African American Artists & African Diaspora”

Among the critical questions that mark African American art historical scholarship today, the legacy of slavery and the transmission of cultural memories rooted in African traditions have emerged as some of the most loaded issues. Tracing the importance of the Afro-Atlantic diaspora in current debates has been recognized as an urgent task, which concerns critics and historians as well as artists. Critical thinking on the subject is heightened by the growing breach between those who refuse to consider black art a distinct category, speaking instead to its universal experience, and voices that claim its unequivocal difference, with race at its very core.

This dialogue will reflect on racial politics and the geography of global circulation by asking how American art has, from the nineteenth century onwards, been interwoven with African/African American/African Diaspora histories. Looking at the historical origins of these relationships and mapping their contemporary expressions, this event is part of the lecture series “The Artist as Geographer” (March 6 and 20, 2018), organized in conjunction with Steven Nelson’s spring 2018 term as Visiting Professor at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris.

Speakers:

  • Anne Lafont, Professor, École des hautes études en sciences sociales
  • Steven Nelson, Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held in English. Please RSVP by March 26 to:
[email protected]rt.eu

Research Workshop: “Framing Environmental Dimensions in American Art”

This second edition of the Terra Foundation Research Workshops will provide the opportunity to discuss current research on the relationship between the visual arts and changing notions of the environment. Exploring depictions of the American landscape, artistic documentation of humans’ impact on the environment, aesthetic notions of landscape conception, and shifting ecological viewpoints in art history, this session will focus on the following projects:

  • Our Home and Native Land – The American Landscape in the Paintings of Birger Sandzén and John F. Carlson
    Isabelle Gapp, PhD Candidate in Art History, University of York
  • “No Picturesque Lyricism Here”: Industrial Wastelands in Lee Friedlander’s Factory Valleys (1982)
    Susann Köhner, PhD Candidate in American Studies, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
  • Observing the “New Landscape of Abstraction and Artifice”
    Nina Leger, Lecturer in Aesthetics, Université Paris 8
  • Toward an Ecocritical Turn of Art History
    Bénédicte Ramade, Lecturer in Art History, Université de Montréal

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held in English. Please RSVP by April 2 to:
[email protected]

Exhibition: James Rosen­quist: Paint­ing as Im­mer­sion

This retrospective ex­hi­bi­tion of Pop Art icon James Rosen­quist (1933–2017) will present his massive works in the context of their cul­tu­r­al, so­cial, and po­lit­i­cal di­men­sions. Along with archival mate­rials and doc­u­ments de­sig­nat­ed by the artist as source ma­te­rials, some of which have not previously been ex­hi­b­it­ed, the show will re­veal Rosen­quist’s marked in­ter­est in history and the political events of his time.

This exhibition will also be on view at the Museum Ludwig, Cologne (November 18, 2017–March 4, 2018).

More information is forthcoming.

Seminar: “Will Bradley’s Art of Art Direction” by Jennifer Greenhill

Jennifer Greenhill, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Southern California, will presents a work-in-progress on graphic artist Will Bradley (1868-1962). Specifically, Greenhill will go beyond Bradley’s well-known contributions to magazine covers and advertisements in publications such as The Inland Printer and The Chap-Book. Greenhill will instead focus on the profound, but under-explored, impact Bradley made on American design in his role as art director for properties owned by William Randolph Hearst. Commissioning art, revamping layouts, and so on, Bradley shaped the look of the popular magazine at a key moment in its history when an influx of advertising revenue and advances in printing technologies made magazines an attractive artistic outlet. Overall, Greenhill aims to not only to piece together these understudied aspects of Bradley’s output but to also offer a fuller picture of Bradley’s significance to the history of design.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/04262018-jennifer-greenhill-university-southern-california

Exhibition: Picture Fiction: Kenneth Josephson and Contemporary Photography

Chicago conceptual photographer Kenneth Josephson (b. 1932) has spent his career scrutinizing photography’s inherent reproducibility and circulation, making use of a mass-cultural archive of images, and mastering self-reflexive, often humorous devices–methods undoubtedly a result of Josephson’s years at the Institute of Design, where as a student he studied under Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. He afterward went on to teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for nearly forty years. Examining Josephson’s production from roughly 1960–1980, Picture Fiction focuses on his four main, ongoing series: Images within Images, Marks and Evidence, History of Photography Series, and Archaeological Series. Largely drawn from the MCA Chicago’s permanent collection, the exhibition reveals concerns shared by Josephson and conceptual artists emerging in the 1960s, and moreover, draws parallels between his practice and contemporary artists.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Picture-Fiction-Kenneth-Josephson-And-Contemporary-Photography

Collection Loan: Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Jane Peterson’s Marché aux Fleurs is exhibited in Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad. This exhibition is also on view at the Mattatuck Museum, November 19, 2017–January 28, 2018; Long Island Museum of Art, Stony Brook, New York, February 11–April 22, 2018;  and The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls, New York, August 5–October 14, 2018.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.columbiamuseum.org/

Jane C. Peterson, Marché au Fleurs, 1908, oil on canvas, 17 1/8 x 23 1/8 in. (43.5 x 58.7 cm), 1994.17
International Conference: “Eccentric, realist, populist, procedural: the politics of figuration in American Art 1929–1980”

This conference addresses figuration in American art as a broad tendency that encompasses representational approaches as well as artworks that are underpinned by the human figure in a procedural sense, even where the body might appear obscure or highly mediated. Through the periodization of this conference, the aim is to address figuration in relation to various flashpoints of social crisis in the United States, beginning with the impetus towards realism and its variants including social surrealism during the Depression, and then traversing towards the mid-century moment when American abstract art gained global prominence at the onset of the Cold War. Across this fifty-year period, the meaning and critical purchase of figuration became a contested ground for debate. On the one hand, it was associated with regression and the irrational, and on the other, with progress and the rational. Although such views cannot be assigned a fixed political value, figuration does not stand as a neutral category within this history. This conference seeks to explore such issues in relation to the various struggles over who counts as human during this period, and to consider how artists working with the figure engaged with this, in both reactionary and critical modes. How did figuration act as a means to humanize, or conversely de-humanize individuals and social groups? Such debates took shape within a variety of politico-historical conjunctures, from the leftist Cultural Front to the black arts movement, from Cold War debates around humanism to artists producing work in opposition to the Vietnam War. And following on from this, how has representation of the human figure frequently been situated as a responsibility to bear, or conversely, a burden to shed, within struggles around race, class, sexuality, and gender in the United States?

The conference is organised by Dr. Larne Abse Gogarty, the Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at the Institut für Kunst- und Bildgeschichte der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

Keynote speakers:

  • Darby English
  • Andrew Hemingway

To view the full call for papers, please visit:
http://www.kunstgeschichte.hu-berlin.de/terra-foundation-for-american-art-postdoctoral-teaching-fellowship

Symposium: “Cartographic Imagination: Art, Literature and Mapping in United States, 1945–1980”

This two-day international conference  investigates spatial representations and practices in postwar US literature and art, and their intersection with mapping. Organizers will investigate the ways in which American space is constructed, imagined, reconfigured, displaced, and questioned in writing and in artistic form. The conference will examine the specificity of the literary and artistic appropriation of cartographic tropes, as well as the possible points of convergence and divergence of literature and art in relation to mapping and the material culture of mapping.

For more information and to register, please visit:  https://www.kent.ac.uk/english/conferences/cartographicimagination/index.html

Seminar: “Moholy-Nagy and the Materiality of Industry” by Robin Schuldenfrei

When the newly emigrated László Moholy-Nagy encountered Chicago’s exhilarating built environment and its exceptional space of commerce—with its framework for the production, distribution, and movement of vast quantities of goods—he had already been evoking, from his earliest days in 1920s Berlin, the rationalization of industry for art. In Chicago, Moholy re-instigated the primacy of the 3D object in his practice. This lecture by Robin Schuldenfrei of the Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to understand Moholy’s engagement with Chicago, and the US, by tracing a long arc across Moholy’s investigations in ephemeral surface effects and the materiality of industry.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/05242018-robin-schuldenfrei-courtauld-institute-art

Exhibition: Chiura Obata: An American Modern

Chiura Obata (1885–1975) was one of the most significant Japanese American artists working on the West Coast in the last century. Born in Okayama, Japan, Obata emigrated to the United States in 1903 and embarked on a seven-decade career that saw the enactment of anti-immigration laws and the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. This exhibition presents an unprecedented survey of Obata’s rich and varied body of work that includes over 150 paintings and personal effects, many of which have never been on public display.

This exhibition will also be on view at the Art, Design, and Architecture Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara (January 13 – April 29, 2018), the Okayama Prefectural Museum (January 18 – March 10, 2019), and the Crocker Art Museum (June 23 – September 29, 2019).

More information is forthcoming.

Exhibition: The American Dream: Pop to the Present

This exhibition presents the British Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition presents prints by celebrated American artists Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, and others. Taking inspiration from the world around them – billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects – these American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures.

This exhibition was also on view at the British Museum (March 9 – June 18, 2017).

More details will be posted on Fondation Custodia’s website:  https://www.fondationcustodia.fr/Expositions-trad

For more information on the exhibition, please visit:
http://americandreamexhibition.org

Exhibition: A Home for Surrealism

A Home for Surrealism offers an in-depth exploration of a select group of painters who planted domestic roots for the surrealist idiom in the 1940s and 1950s. Working in and around Chicago, Gertrude Abercrombie, Dorothea Tanning, John Wilde, Julia Thecla, Harold Noecker, and Julio de Diego interpreted the European movement as something at once more personal and more accessible to its audience. Thematizing the interior while also reconceptualizing ideas of imagination and fantasy, these artists offer tableaus that emphasize the narrative capacities of self and home. While Chicago has long been acknowledged as an important center for the exhibition and collection of European surrealist painting, its own practitioners deserve more widespread recognition. Through their distinct motifs and styles, these artists made surrealism into something that was local to Chicago, even as it acknowledged its international foundations. Working with a team of scholars, The Arts Club, which was on the forefront of introducing surrealism in the 1920s and 30s, offers a focused and revelatory snapshot of Chicago surrealism.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artsclubchicago.org/exhibition/home-for-surrealism/

Exhibition: Music of Color: Sam Gilliam, 1964–1973

The Music of Color presents 50 works by American abstract painter Sam Gilliam from public and private collections in Europe and the United States. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture, creating works recognized for monumentality and forceful use of color.

For more information, please visit:
https://kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/exhibitions/2018/gilliam

Exhibition: Thomas Cole’s Journey: Eden to Empire

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Eden to Empire will examine Cole’s work within a global context. The exhibition will showcase the artist’s most iconic works, including The Oxbow (1836) and his five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36) as a direct outcome of his transatlantic career, and examine Cole’s legacy in establishing a school of 19th-century landscape art in America.

This exhibition is also on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (January 30 – May 13, 2018).

For more information, please visit: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/thomas-coles-journey

Exhibition: Sculpting a Chicago Artist: Richard Hunt and his Teachers: Nelli Bar and Egon Weiner

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago cultivated artist Richard Hunt in the 1950s by the guidance of two dynamic teachers. Nelli Bar taught Richard Hunt during his adolescence, and Egon Weiner was his college professor. Bar and Weiner represent the generation of artists who fled Europe after the rise of the Nazi regime and found Chicago as the new home for their artistic ambitions. Both received their education in European academies under prominent teachers during the 1920s. Weiner and Bar produced a new post-war generation of artists, including Richard Hunt. Bar continued to accompany Hunt’s career as he recalls: “She has influenced me as a person over our 30-year relationship.” Hunt remembers Weiner for “his exuberance and nurturing manner – and for being a bundle of energy.” This energy was transmitted to his student Richard Hunt as the Museum of Modern Art purchased one of his sculptures in 1957 just after his graduation and eventually he evolved into one of the most prominent Chicago sculptors and an international master.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.oakton.edu/about/thearts/museum/future_exhibitions/index.php

Exhibition: Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow

Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow explores Chicago’s history of robust recognition and early acceptance of self-taught and outsider art and artists. The exhibition presents intrinsic themes embodied in the works of 12 artists, including Chicago icons, Henry Darger, Lee Godie, Joseph Yoakum, and others. Themes found in several artists’ works and represented here include the psychologically-charged tension in oppositions and contradictions; interaction between high style and the vernacular, between nature and culture; drawing on memory and the expressive use of line and form as a survival mechanism; immigration and/or relocation as a defining experience; surviving the African American experience; and the power of portraiture as a view into society, psyche, and soul.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.art.org/chicago-calling-art-against-the-flow

Collection Loan: Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Jane Peterson’s Marché aux Fleurs is exhibited in Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad. This exhibition is also on view at the Mattatuck Museum, November 19, 2017–January 28, 2018; Long Island Museum of Art, Stony Brook, New York, February 11–April 22, 2018; and the Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, May 13–July 22, 2018.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.hydecollection.org/

Jane C. Peterson, Marché au Fleurs, 1908, oil on canvas, 17 1/8 x 23 1/8 in. (43.5 x 58.7 cm), 1994.17
Exhibition: Todros Geller: Strange Worlds

Todros Geller: Strange Worlds focuses on the multifaceted oeuvre of Todros Geller (1889–1949), an influential Chicago artist and central figure in the history of modern American Jewish art. Born in Ukraine, Geller immigrated to Chicago in 1918, which remained his home until his death. An active proponent of the concept of Jewish art, he served as a mentor to numerous Chicago Jewish artists and as a prominent educator, first as a teacher at the Jewish People’s Institute and Jane Addams Hull House, then as supervisor of art for the College of Jewish Studies (later Spertus Institute) and acting director of The Jewish Museum in Chicago. In both work and life, Geller reflected the prevailing social, political, and artistic concerns of his time, while remaining intimately entwined with Chicago’s evolving Jewish community and its efforts to establish, maintain, and promote Jewish identity.

This exhibition draws from the unique holdings from the Spertus Institute’s collection to survey the broad scope of Geller’s creative endeavors. In addition to a broad range of paintings, prints, and works on paper, the collection includes an extensive archive of Geller’s personal materials, encompassing preparatory sketches, letters, books, postcards, periodicals, news articles, photographs, posters, book illustrations, and bookplates. Todros Geller: Strange Worlds draws on these unique resources—the majority on view for the first time—to examine the public and private concerns that animated Geller’s work throughout his career.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.spertus.edu/exhibitions/strange-worlds