Terra Foundation-supported Events

Seminar: “Moholy-Nagy and the Materiality of Industry” by Robin Schuldenfrei

When the newly emigrated László Moholy-Nagy encountered Chicago’s exhilarating built environment and its exceptional space of commerce—with its framework for the production, distribution, and movement of vast quantities of goods—he had already been evoking, from his earliest days in 1920s Berlin, the rationalization of industry for art. In Chicago, Moholy re-instigated the primacy of the 3D object in his practice. This lecture by Robin Schuldenfrei of the Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to understand Moholy’s engagement with Chicago, and the US, by tracing a long arc across Moholy’s investigations in ephemeral surface effects and the materiality of industry.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/05242018-robin-schuldenfrei-courtauld-institute-art

Exhibition: Chiura Obata: An American Modern

Chiura Obata (1885–1975) was one of the most significant Japanese American artists working on the West Coast in the last century. Born in Okayama, Japan, Obata emigrated to the United States in 1903 and embarked on a seven-decade career that saw the enactment of anti-immigration laws and the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. This exhibition presents an unprecedented survey of Obata’s rich and varied body of work that includes over 150 paintings and personal effects, many of which have never been on public display.

This exhibition is also on view at the Art, Design, and Architecture Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara (January 13–April 29, 2018), the Okayama Prefectural Museum (January 18–March 10, 2019), and the Crocker Art Museum (June 23–September 29, 2019).

For more information, please visit:
https://umfa.utah.edu/chiura-obata

Exhibition: The American Dream: Pop to the Present. Prints from the British Museum

This exhibition presents the British Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition presents prints by celebrated American artists Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, and others. Taking inspiration from the world around them—billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects—these American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures.

This exhibition was also on view at the British Museum (March 9–June 18, 2017).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.fondationcustodia.fr/Upcoming

Conference: “Art, Life & Politics: American Printmaking from the 1960s to Today”

Printmaking concerns social attitudes, you know—politics and a public.”
Franz Kline, Artnews, January 1972, p. 29.

This international conference will look at the ways printmaking engaged with and often challenged American society and politics from the 1960s to today. Special attention will be given to print workshops, collaborative practices, and the ways in which the print media encouraged art activism. Focusing on the specificity of materiality and creative process, the conference seeks to examine how the various layers of these works could be socially and/or politically encoded. Among the questions speakers will address: How was the meaning of artistic authorship redefined through printmaking? Who were the audiences? How did artists use original multiples at a time when the personal and the political became increasingly intertwined?

“Art, Life & Politics” is held in conjunction with the exhibition The American Dream: Pop to the Present. Prints from the British Museum, a collaboration between the Fondation Custodia, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and the British Museum.

Speakers:

  • Stephen Coppel (Curator, Modern Prints and Drawings, British Museum)
  • Jacqueline Francis (Associate Professor, Visual and Critical Studies Department, California College of the Arts)
  • Elisabeth Lebovici (Independent Scholar)
  • Laurence Schmidlin (Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne)
  • Richard Shiff (Professor, Art History, The University of Texas at Austin)
  • Susan Tallman (Adjunct Associate Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago & Editor-in-Chief, Art in Print)
  • Hervé Vanel (Assistant Professor, Art History, The American University of Paris)

On this occasion, a conversation between artist Jim Dine and Ruth Fine (Independent Curator & Curator Emeritus, Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art) will also take place. This event is by separate invitation only.

For more information and to consult the full conference program, please click here.

Symposium: “Empathy, Intimacy, and Ethics in American Art”

Do we feel ourselves by looking at objects? This two-day international symposium in Berlin returns to the late nineteenth-century German proposal that empathy (die Einfühlung) constitutes a way to understand aesthetic response. In contemporary usage, empathy implies the ability to share another person’s feelings, offering the possibility of transcending social divisions through emotion. However, the word’s complex life begins in an aesthetic theory of how human emotions project into optical forms.

Who feels themselves in which objects? Considering the relationships of visual perception, bodily touch, and emotional response, symposium speakers will offer new narratives and counter-narratives of empathy and intimacy that foreground the differences of power, race, ethnicity, and gender that mark the complex history of American art. Talks will range across art forms, styles, and periods, including nineteenth-century performances and neo-classical sculpture, early twentieth-century urban photography and Communist dance, post-war abstract sculpture by veterans in France, contemporary memorials to victims of police brutality, and social practice projects with refugees. We will consider empathy as a notion for opening connections, as well as highlighting the disconnections, among separated academic disciplines and national aesthetic histories.

Speakers:

  • Larne Abse Gogarty
  • Saidiya Hartman
  • Caroline A. Jones
  • Lauren Kroiz
  • Katharina Oguntoye
  • Hortense Spillers
  • Leigh Raiford
  • Heike Raphael-Hernandez

For more information, please visit:
http://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/en/faculty/culture/dates/Terra-Conference.html

Exhibition: A Home for Surrealism

A Home for Surrealism offers an in-depth exploration of a select group of painters who planted domestic roots for the surrealist idiom in the 1940s and 1950s. Working in and around Chicago, Gertrude Abercrombie, Dorothea Tanning, John Wilde, Julia Thecla, Harold Noecker, and Julio de Diego interpreted the European movement as something at once more personal and more accessible to its audience. Thematizing the interior while also reconceptualizing ideas of imagination and fantasy, these artists offer tableaus that emphasize the narrative capacities of self and home. While Chicago has long been acknowledged as an important center for the exhibition and collection of European surrealist painting, its own practitioners deserve more widespread recognition. Through their distinct motifs and styles, these artists made surrealism into something that was local to Chicago, even as it acknowledged its international foundations. Working with a team of scholars, The Arts Club, which was on the forefront of introducing surrealism in the 1920s and 30s, offers a focused and revelatory snapshot of Chicago surrealism.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artsclubchicago.org/exhibition/home-for-surrealism/

Exhibition: Music of Color: Sam Gilliam, 1964–1973

The Music of Color presents 50 works by American abstract painter Sam Gilliam from public and private collections in Europe and the United States. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture, creating works recognized for monumentality and forceful use of color.

For more information, please visit:
https://kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/exhibitions/2018/gilliam

Exhibition: Anni Albers

Co-organized by the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and the Tate Modern, London, Anni Albers showcases the multifaceted weaver’s long career. Albers (1899–1994) studied during the 1920s at the Bauhaus School. After emigrating to the United States, with her husband Josef Albers, she taught at Black Mountain College. At the center of her creative achievement are her woven images, characterized by complex textile structures, abstraction, and subtle coloration.

The exhibition is also on view at Tate Modern, London (October 11, 2018–January 27, 2019).

For more information, please visit: https://www.kunstsammlung.de/en/discover/exhibition-preview.html

Exhibition: Thomas Cole’s Journey: Eden to Empire

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Eden to Empire will examine Cole’s work within a global context. The exhibition will showcase the artist’s most iconic works, including The Oxbow (1836) and his five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36) as a direct outcome of his transatlantic career, and examine Cole’s legacy in establishing a school of 19th-century landscape art in America.

This exhibition is also on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (January 30 – May 13, 2018).

For more information, please visit: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/thomas-coles-journey

Exhibition: Sculpting a Chicago Artist: Richard Hunt and his Teachers: Nelli Bar and Egon Weiner

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago cultivated artist Richard Hunt in the 1950s by the guidance of two dynamic teachers. Nelli Bar taught Richard Hunt during his adolescence, and Egon Weiner was his college professor. Bar and Weiner represent the generation of artists who fled Europe after the rise of the Nazi regime and found Chicago as the new home for their artistic ambitions. Both received their education in European academies under prominent teachers during the 1920s. Weiner and Bar produced a new post-war generation of artists, including Richard Hunt. Bar continued to accompany Hunt’s career as he recalls: “She has influenced me as a person over our 30-year relationship.” Hunt remembers Weiner for “his exuberance and nurturing manner – and for being a bundle of energy.” This energy was transmitted to his student Richard Hunt as the Museum of Modern Art purchased one of his sculptures in 1957 just after his graduation and eventually he evolved into one of the most prominent Chicago sculptors and an international master.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.oakton.edu/about/thearts/museum/future_exhibitions/index.php

Study Day: “Video Art and the Public Sphere in the US: 1965–1980”

This conversational study session will examine video art as a young medium and its relationship to the public, broadly speaking, during the contentious late 1960s and 1970s when visions of American democracy were changing. We are interested in video’s activist identity and its contributions to cultures of protest, its relationship to the “establishment,” modes of dissemination, collaborative making practices, portability, and its insertion into transnational dialogues.

LUX is an international arts agency that supports and promotes artists’ moving image practices and the ideas that surround them. The only organization of its kind in the UK, LUX represents the country’s only significant collection of artists’ film and video, and is the largest distributor of such work in Europe.

This event is by invitation only.

Exhibition: Christo & Jeanne-Claude: Barrels and The Mastaba

The Serpentine Galleries presents Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s history of barrel artworks. Since 1958, barrels have been a dominant feature of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s sculptures and installations, which they have erected at varying scales internationally. The exhibition will offer new perspectives on Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s career to the large-scale, wrapped and fabric-based works for which they are best known. Simultaneously, Christo will present The Mastaba (Project for London, Hyde Park, Serpentine Lake), a temporary floating sculpture on The Serpentine lake.

For more information, please visit: http://www.serpentinegalleries.org/exhibitions-events/christo-and-jeanne-claude-barrels-and-mastaba-1958-2018

Exhibition: Gordon Matta-Clark: Mutation in Space

The National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo will present first full-scale retrospective of American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978) in Asia. The presentation will include his sculptures, photographs, videos and drawings. Known for “building cuts” projects in which he removed parts of floors and walls from buildings to be demolished, the exhibition will also include his work in street and performance art.

For more information please visit:
http://www.momat.go.jp/english/am/2018/

Collection Loan: John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age/

From the collection of the Terra Collection for American Art, John Singer Sargent’s A Parisian Beggar Girl and Dennis Miller Bunker’s The Mirror are exhibited in John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age.  This exhibition is on view at the Art Institute of Chicago, June 20 – September 30, 2018.

 

 

For more information, please visit:

http://www.artic.edu/exhibitions

John Singer Sargent, A Parisian Beggar Girl, c. 1880, oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 17 3/16 in. (64.5 x 43.7 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.14
Collection loan: Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting

This exhibition explores Homer’s relationship to photography, including his travels with other artists and photographers during the Civil War. From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Homer’s On Guard will be exhibited in dialogue with painting, printmaking, drawing, and photography that was central to Homer’s artistic practice.  Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting is on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, June 23–October 28, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.bowdoin.edu/art-museum/exhibitions/2018/winslow-homer-camera.shtml

Winslow Homer, On Guard, 1864, oil on canvas, 12 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. (31.1 x 23.5 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.11
Exhibition: Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow

Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow explores Chicago’s history of robust recognition and early acceptance of self-taught and outsider art and artists. The exhibition presents intrinsic themes embodied in the works of 12 artists, including Chicago icons, Henry Darger, Lee Godie, Joseph Yoakum, and others. Themes found in several artists’ works and represented here include the psychologically-charged tension in oppositions and contradictions; interaction between high style and the vernacular, between nature and culture; drawing on memory and the expressive use of line and form as a survival mechanism; immigration and/or relocation as a defining experience; surviving the African American experience; and the power of portraiture as a view into society, psyche, and soul.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.art.org/chicago-calling-art-against-the-flow

Exhibition: Robert Smithson: Time Crystals

Robert Smithson: Time Crystals is the first exhibition in Australia dedicated to the artist. Best known for his radical land art of the 1960s and early 1970s, Smithson is now widely recognized as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Inspired by ideas of crystalline geometry and non-biological time, he redefined abstraction and challenged art history.

Featuring new research on the artist’s practice, Time Crystals presents sculpture, photography, film, drawings, and texts borrowed from major Australian and international collections. It also includes the most extensive display of Smithson’s manuscript and archival material to date drawn from the Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt Papers at the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art.

This exhibition is also on view at The University of Queensland (March 10 – July 8, 2018).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.monash.edu/muma/exhibitions/exhibition-archive/2018/Robert-Smithson-Time-Crystals

Collection Loan: Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Jane Peterson’s Marché aux Fleurs is exhibited in Jane Peterson: At Home and Abroad. This exhibition is also on view at the Mattatuck Museum, November 19, 2017–January 28, 2018; Long Island Museum of Art, Stony Brook, New York, February 11–April 22, 2018; and the Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, May 13–July 22, 2018.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.hydecollection.org/

Jane C. Peterson, Marché au Fleurs, 1908, oil on canvas, 17 1/8 x 23 1/8 in. (43.5 x 58.7 cm), 1994.17
Exhibition: American Masters

This exhibition tells the story of the formation of the National Gallery of Australia’s  American collection. From Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Pop, Neo-Dada and Photo-Realism, to Conceptual, Land and Performance Art, American Masters examines how a generation of young Americans challenged local traditions and reinvented modern art, inspired by European émigrés including Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse, Piet Mondrian and Josef Albers. The international impact of major American artists between the 1940s and 1980s is captured in masterworks by Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Chuck Close, Donald Judd, Eva Hesse and Louise Bourgeois. Highlights include paintings and works on paper by artists of the New York School and a selection of light works by Dan Flavin, Bruce Nauman, Keith Sonnier and James Turrell.

For more information, please visit: 
https://nga.gov.au/americanmasters/default.cfm

Exhibition: Todros Geller: Strange Worlds

Todros Geller: Strange Worlds focuses on the multifaceted oeuvre of Todros Geller (1889–1949), an influential Chicago artist and central figure in the history of modern American Jewish art. Born in Ukraine, Geller immigrated to Chicago in 1918, which remained his home until his death. An active proponent of the concept of Jewish art, he served as a mentor to numerous Chicago Jewish artists and as a prominent educator, first as a teacher at the Jewish People’s Institute and Jane Addams Hull House, then as supervisor of art for the College of Jewish Studies (later Spertus Institute) and acting director of The Jewish Museum in Chicago. In both work and life, Geller reflected the prevailing social, political, and artistic concerns of his time, while remaining intimately entwined with Chicago’s evolving Jewish community and its efforts to establish, maintain, and promote Jewish identity.

This exhibition draws from the unique holdings from the Spertus Institute’s collection to survey the broad scope of Geller’s creative endeavors. In addition to a broad range of paintings, prints, and works on paper, the collection includes an extensive archive of Geller’s personal materials, encompassing preparatory sketches, letters, books, postcards, periodicals, news articles, photographs, posters, book illustrations, and bookplates. Todros Geller: Strange Worlds draws on these unique resources—the majority on view for the first time—to examine the public and private concerns that animated Geller’s work throughout his career.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.spertus.edu/exhibitions/strange-worlds

Seminar: “A Threat to Human Scale: The Eames Office’s Tandem Seating System for Chicago’s O’Hare Airport (1962)” by Michael Golec

Michael Golec, Associate Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will discuss how Charles Eames incorporated the notion of “human scale” into his design approach for Chicago’s O’Hare Airport in the early 1960s.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/09062018-michael-golec-school-art-institute-chicago

Exhibition: 3–D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980

3-D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980 examines the little-known sculptural work and dimensional painting made by the Chicago Imagists during the early years of their practice. As the first in-depth exploration of the overall affinity of Imagist artists for objects, the exhibition features artists who worked individually to craft unique approaches, but who shared key influences, such as Surrealism and the Surrealist objects. In addition to members of the original Imagist groups, the exhibition includes work by Don Baum, the chief curator of the Imagist moment; Ray Yoshida, the teacher with whom many Imagists studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; as well as H.C. Westermann, arguably the point of origin for the exhibition.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://tang.skidmore.edu/exhibitions/238-3-d-doings-the-imagist-object-in-chicago-art-1964-1980

Exhibition: South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980

During the 1960s and 1970s, Chicago was shaped by art and ideas produced and circulated on the South Side. Yet the history of the period’s creative and social ferment has often remained segregated by the city’s social, political, and geographic divides. South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980—organized by the Smart Museum in collaboration with the DuSable Museum of African American History and presented concurrently with South Side Stories: Holdings at the DuSable—takes a nuanced look at the cultural history of Chicago’s South Side during this momentous era of change and conflict, with a focus on artists of the Black Arts Movement. Through nearly 100 objects, the show upends dominant narratives of the period and unearths rich stories by examining watershed cultural moments from the Hairy Who to the Wall of Respect, from the Civil Rights movement to the AfriCOBRA, from vivid protest posters to visionary outsider art, and from the Free University movement to the radical jazz of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/south-side-stories-rethinking-chicago-art/

Exhibition: Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago

Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago examines and illuminates the distinctive vein of industrial films which Chicago became known for in the 1950s and 1960s, and their compelling relationship to more avant-garde film experiments produced by the same artists and designers, including, most prominently, Morton and Millie Goldsholl and their firm Goldsholl and Associates. The Goldsholls were part of a generation of designers that emerged from the Institute of Design, where László Moholy-Nagy famously fostered a curriculum of aesthetic experimentation and social engagement. The Goldsholls’ innovative integration of film with other forms of visual production such as print advertising and brand development placed them at the forefront of their peers in design, and the wider community of filmmakers in Chicago. Designers in Film is the first exhibition to focus on the relationship between film and mid-twentieth century art and design in Chicago, and to study this history as a particular outgrowth of the city’s social, artistic, and political climate. The exhibition features highly inventive moving images alongside materials related to their creation, ranging from designed objects to drawings, print advertisements, photographs, and other ephemera.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/designers-in-film.html

Exhibition: Anni Albers

Co-organized by the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and the Tate Modern, London, Anni Albers showcases the multifaceted weaver’s long career. Albers (1899–1994) studied during the 1920s at the Bauhaus School. After emigrating to the United States, with her husband Josef Albers, she taught at Black Mountain College. At the center of her creative achievement are her woven images, characterized by complex textile structures, abstraction, and subtle coloration.

The exhibition is also on view at K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf (June 9–September 9, 2019)

More information is forthcoming.

Seminar: “The Open Plan Office in the Windy City” by Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler

In the late 1960s, the open plan office concept challenged conventional office planning by radically reimagining the office as a space that could reduce hierarchy, increase communication, and support organizational change. Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler, Assistant Professor of Design History at Purdue University, will argue that the city of Chicago was a vital nexus of activity in the earliest promotion and experimentation of the open plan office concept.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/10182018-jennifer-kaufmann-buhler-purdue-university