Terra Foundation-supported Events

Dialogue: “A Different Way to Move: Minimalisms, New York, 1960–1980”

As it emerged in the mid-1960s, American minimalism was the subject of theoretical and, later, historiographical critical debate. Few artists recognized themselves in this term, which seemed to respond more to the formal appearance of their works than to innovations in conceptual process, production, and presentation. The exhibition A Different Way to Move: Minimalisms, New York, 1960–1980, presented this year at the Carré d’art-musée d’art contemporain, Nîmes, (April 6–September 17), suggests another approach to this chapter of art history. By expanding a narrative usually founded solely on the visual arts, the exhibition shows how important it was for a community of New York artists to experiment in the field of dance and choreography, first in Yoko Ono’s loft and then, beginning in 1962, around the Judson Memorial Church.

In this dialogue, the exhibition’s curator, Marcella Lista (Chief Curator, Musée national d’art moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris), will discuss with Valérie Mavridorakis (Associate Professor, Haute école d’art et de design-HEAD-Genève) a pluralistic interpretation of this artistic scene, resisting the temptation of a formalist approach, so as to present more fully the corporeal and kinesthetic experimentation that underlies the three-dimensional abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s.

This dialogue is part of the annual Semaine des cultures étrangères, organized by the Forum des instituts culturels étrangers à Paris (FICEP).

This event is free and open to the public. It will be held in French. Please RSVP by September 25 to:
[email protected]

Babette Mangolte, Trisha Brown, Woman Walking Down a Ladder, 1973. Photo © 1973 / 2010 Babette Mangolte, Courtesy of the artist & Broadway 1602.
Exhibition: Walker Evans

This major retrospective of seminal photographer Walker Evans views his work through the lens of one of his obsessions — the American vernacular, or the language of everyday life found in roadside attractions, postcards, storefronts, and signage across the country.Over five decades, Evans’s powerful images responded to and reflected the spirit, suffering, and fortitude of a nation. His iconic images of the Great Depression and his postwar photo essays depicting shop window displays, urban architecture, and junked automobiles defined a new documentary style that continues to influence generations of artists.

The exhibition was also be presented at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France (April 26, 2017–August 14, 2017).

For more information, please visit: https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/walker-evans/

Exhibition: Peter Saul

This exhibition will be the first comprehensive presentation of artist Peter Saul (b. 1934) in Germany. Saul’s idiosyncratic style draws on Pop Art, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Chicago Imagism, and California Funk in its explorations of American politics and pop culture. He shared Pop Art’s interest in the banal, the consumer society, and the cheerful imagery of comics in bright attractive colors. Deliberately provocative, Saul’s paintings explore the American dream with extravagant humor and harsh criticism.

This exhibition was also on view at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, Germany, (June 2–September 3, 2017).

For more information please visit:
http://www.deichtorhallen.de/index.php?id=523&L=1

 

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2017 to December 2017.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

George Bellows, The Palisades, 1909. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.10
Exhibition: Inventing Downtown: Artist Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965

Examining the New York art scene during the fertile years between the apex of Abstract Expressionism and the rise of Pop Art and Minimalism, Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965 is the first show ever to survey this vital period from the vantage point of its artist-run galleries—crucibles of experimentation and innovation that radically changed the art world. With more than 200 paintings, sculptures, installations, drawings, photographs, ephemera, and films, the show reveals a scene that was much more diverse than has previously been acknowledged, with women and artists of color playing major roles. It features works by abstract and figurative painters and sculptors, as well as pioneers of installation and performance art.

This exhibition was also on view at the Grey Art Gallery.

For more information, please visit: 
http://nyuad.nyu.edu/en/news-events/exhibitions/inventing-downtown-new-york.html

Collection Loan: World War I and American Art

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Lyonel Feininger’s Denstedt is exhibited in World War I and American Art.

This exhibition is on view at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 4, 2016–April 9,2017; at New York Historical Society, New York, New York, May 26–September 3, 2017 (as World War I Beyond the Trenches); and the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee, October 6, 2017–January 21, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://fristcenter.org/calendar/detail/world-war-i-and-american-art

Lyonel Feininger, Denstedt, 1917, Oil on canvas, 34 3/8 x 46 5/8 in. (87.3 x 118.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1988.27
Collection Loan:Wild Spaces, Open Places: Hunting and Fishing in American Art

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Richard LaBarre Goodwin’s Two Snipes is exhibited in Wild Spaces, Open Places: Hunting and Fishing in American Art.  This exhibition is on view at the Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee, October 23, 2016–January 15, 2017; Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska, February 12–May 7, 2017; Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont, June 4–August 27, 2017; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, October 7, 2017–January 7, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.cartermuseum.org/exhibitions/wild-spaces-open-seasons-hunting-and-fishing-in-american-art

Richard La Barre Goodwin, Two Snipes, between 1880 and 1902 Oil on canvas 20 1/8 x 17 1/8 in. (51.1 x 43.5 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John Estabrook C1982.2
Collection Loan: Henry James and American Painting

The exhibition Henry James and American Painting explores the intersection between Henry James’s friendships with American artists and his literary work. From the Terra Foundation Collection, the painting The Green Hat, by Lilla Cabot Perry, the wife of James’s childhood friend, is exhibited along with a selection of photographs, manuscripts, books and letters.  This exhibition is on view at the Morgan Library & Museum, June 9–September 10, 2017 traveling to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston, Massachusetts, October 19, 2017–January 21, 2018.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.gardnermuseum.org/collection/exhibitions

 

Lilla Cabot Perry, The Green Hat, 1913, Oil on canvas, 33 3/4 x 26 1/4in. (85.7 x 66.7cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1987.25
Exhibition: Mitchell/Riopelle: Un Couple Dans La Démesure

Co-organized by the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the exhibition will explore the artistic outputs of American Joan Mitchell and Canadian Jean-Paul Riopelle.  This couple shared their lives for nearly 25 years, living in Paris and Vétheuil in the Seine valley. The exhibition will explore their romantic relationship and how each painter developed a workshop practice and a distinctive body of work while participating in a broader artistic dialogue focusing on abstraction.

This exhibition will also be on display at the Art Gallery of Ontario (February–May 2018).

For more information, please visit: 
 https://www.mnbaq.org/en/exhibition/mitchell-riopelle-1252

Exhibition: Once upon a time… The Western. A new frontier in Art and Film

Co-organized by the Denver Art Museum and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, this is first major exhibition to examine the Western genre and its evolution from the mid-1800s to the present through fine art, film, and popular culture. Featuring 450 paintings, sculptures, installations photos and numerous film excerpts, the exhibition explores gender roles, race relations, and gun violence—offering a visual journey that is more than cowboys and American Indians, pursuits and duels, or bandits and barroom brawls.

The exhibition is also on view at the Denver Art Museum, Denver Colorado, as The Western: An Epic in Art and Film (May 27–September 10, 2017).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.mbam.qc.ca/en/exhibitions/upcoming/once-upon-a-time-the-western-a-new-frontier-in-art-and-film/

Exhibition/Collection Loan: California Mexicana: Missions to Murals, 1820–1930

California Mexicana: Missions to Murals, 1820–1930 explores how Mexico became California.  Juxtaposing paintings with popular posters, prints, and some of the earliest movies made in Los Angeles, the exhibition reveals how this image of California spread worldwide. Objects range from picturesque landscapes of Alta California and still life paintings featuring fruits, flowers, and other plants that celebrated the state’s agricultural growth, to works by early modernists such as the Mexican painters Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo.  Included in the exhibition from the Terra Foundation Collection, William S. Jewett ’s The Promised Land-The Grayson Family  depicts Captain A. J. Grayson, an ornithologist-artist, his wife, and son as they emerge from the wilderness to view the summit of the Sierra Nevada.

California Mexicana: Missions to Murals, 1820–1930  is part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.

For more information, please visit:
http://lagunaartmuseum.org/california-mexicana-missions-to-murals-1820-1930/

William S. Jewett, The Promised Land – The Grayson Family, 1850, oil on canvas, 50 3/4 x 64 in. (128.9 x 162.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.79
Conference: “The Course of Empires: American-Italian Cultural Relations, 1770–1980”

This international conference will examine the persistent fascination of American and Italian artists with the cultural achievements of ancient Rome and the Renaissance. It seeks to update and broaden  understanding of American-Italian cultural relations from the Revolutionary Era through the Cold War by encompassing the diversity of voices and approaches in contemporary transnational scholarship.

Among the topics to be explored are: an investigation of the roles of Italy and the newly built American Academy in Rome in keeping alive classical and Renaissance traditions at the turn of the twentieth century; an examination of the ways in which public commissions of the 1920s and 1930s (including New Deal and Italian Fascist programs) maintained a romance with the Renaissance fresco tradition; and an analysis of the increasing cross-cultural exchange between Italy and the United States in the Cold War era, with the inauguration of the Venice Biennale and the formation of the Peggy Guggenheim gallery.

This event is the companion conference to Hybrid Republicanism: Italy and American Art, 1840–1918, which occurred at the American Academy in Rome in the fall of 2016.

For more information, please visit:
http://americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2017/empires/

Seminar: “Off the Rails: Chicago’s Decline as a Center of Manufacturing and Design in the Era of Transportation Deregulation” by Carma Gorman

Carma Gorman, Professor of Art and Art History and the University of Texas at Austin, will argue that deregulation of US transportation industries in the late 1970s and 1980s was a crucial turning point in which the manufacturing and design industries dwindled in Chicago and across the Rust Belt. Bess Williamson, Assistant Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will moderate the discussion.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://newberry.org/10192017-carma-gorman-university-texas-austin

Exhibition: Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry

Co-organized by the Jewish Museum and the Art Gallery of Ontario, this exhibition will offer a reconsideration of artist Florine Stettheimer through more than 50 paintings and drawings, a selection of costume and theater designs, photographs and ephemera, and critically acclaimed poems. Revealing Stettheimer’s singular and often satiric vision and significant role in American modern art, the exhibition will highlight the artist’s distinctly personal style of painting, Stettheimer’s position amidst New York’s artistic elite and avant-gardes, and her continued influence on artistic practice today.

The exhibition is also on view at the Jewish Museum, New York City (May 5–September 24, 2017).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.ago.net/florine-stettheimer-painting-poetry

Conference: “In and Out of American Art: Between Provincialism and Transnationalism, 1940–80”

This conference will reassess how artists and art professionals negotiated the formidable reputation of American art, both within the US and internationally, between the years 1940 and 1980. During these decades the prestige of the US art world—for which “New York” functioned as a synecdoche— was understood to enjoy a global reach. Speakers seek to explore how artists moving in and out of the art worlds of American art during this period engaged with the power complex of provincialism, in the light of the current research emphasis on artistic transnational exchange.

Registration is free, but please email the organizers at inandoutofamericanart (at) gmail.com to confirm your place.

For more information, please visit:
https://inandoutofamericanart.wordpress.com/

Exhibition: Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Medium

This exhibition explores the life, work and legacy of Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989), presenting the artist’s best-known photographs alongside work that has never been published. The exhibition covers Mapplethorpe’s origins in the downtown New York scene in the 1970s, through his rise to fame as a photographer in the early 1980s, to his centrality in the so-called Culture Wars in 1989, the year of his death.

The exhibition is also on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (March 20–July 31, 2016).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/robert-mapplethorpe/

Exhibition/Collection Loan: Coming Away: Winslow Homer and England

Developed around two iconic Homer paintings—the Worcester Art Museum’s The Gale (1883–93) and the Milwaukee Art Museum’s Hark! The Lark (1882)—the exhibition Coming Away: Winslow Homer and England explores the artist’s time in Cullercoats, England, in 1881 and 1882. Jointly coordinated by Worcester and Milwaukee, the exhibition features the most comprehensive group of oils made during or emerging directly from Homer’s time abroad. Shown alongside comparative paintings by English artists, these works complicate our understanding of Homer’s art as purely American in subject and style.  From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Winslow Homer’s Perils of the Sea and The Nurse are exhibited.

This exhibition is also on view at the Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, (March 2–May 20, 2018).

For more information please visit: 
http://www.worcesterart.org/exhibitions/winslow-homer/

Winslow Homer, The Nurse, 1867, oil on panel, 19 x 11 in. (48.3 x 27.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.74
Colloquium: “The Black Metropolis, Between Past and Future: Race, Urban Planning, and Afro-American Culture in Chicago”

This colloquium seeks to reevaluate the cultural contributions of artists and designers from the South and West Sides of Chicago in defining an African American identity nationally. By doing so, it will strive to demonstrate the particularities of the Black Chicago Renaissance as distinct from the Harlem Renaissance. This multidisciplinary event spans the domains of sociology, history, and art history from the 1920s to the present. It is organized by the University of Chicago Center in Paris in partnership with the Université Paris Diderot, the Fondation des États-Unis, and the Institut d’études politiques de Paris (Sciences Po); with the support of the Université Paris-Sorbonne. It will be hosted in multiple locations. This event is part of the Terra Foundation for American Art’s initiative Art Design Chicago.

Exhibitions, documentary screenings, and a performance will take place in connection with the colloquium. For the complete program, locations, and associated events, please click here.

Seminar: “Graphic Design: between Negation and Affirmation in Container Corporation’s Great Ideas Advertising Series, c. 1950-1980” by Lara Allison

Lara Allison, Lecturer in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will examine the relationship between Abstract Expressionism, European modernism, and Pop Art in Walter Paepcke’s The Great Ideas of Western Man advertising campaign, founded in 1950. Michael Golec, Assistant Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will moderate the discussion.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://newberry.org/11162017-lara-allison-school-art-institute-chicago

Dialogue: “Women Inside and Outside the Grid: New Approaches to Modernist Sculpture”

Recent attention to American women sculptors of the 1960s and 1970s has significantly extended the parameters of thinking about high-modernist sculpture and minimalist aesthetics in general. New work has come to the foreground, and interpretation has shifted. For example, the exhibition Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, held at the Museum of Modern Art in the summer of 2017, engages the work of Lee Bontecou, Anne Truitt, Louise Bourgeois, and many others. Readings of this form of sculpture, claiming gender as a multivalent and unstable sign, put into question the rhetoric of immediacy, unity, and power that has been associated with the art of this period, in particular by artist Donald Judd and critics Clement Greenberg and Michael Fried. Going beyond the pioneering feminist criticism of Lucy Lippard, Annette Michelson, and Barbara Rose, these studies unsettle sharp oppositions between attributes that are supposedly masculine and others more commonly equated with feminist artistic language, especially in the cases of Truitt and Bontecou. Equally important in this revisionist rewriting is the close examination of the temporal dimension characterizing many of these works. Participants are invited to look at modernist sculpture again, perhaps in a richer and more subtle manner than before.

Speakers:

  • Jo Applin, Professor of Art History, The Courtauld Institute of Art
  • Miguel de Baca, Associate Professor of Art History, Lake Forest College and Terra Foundation Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held in English. Please RSVP by November 13 to:
[email protected]