Terra Foundation-supported Events

Selecting the Arte Útil Open Call Chicago: A global context for Chicago social practice

“Selecting the Arte Útil Open Call Chicago” is an open workshop on Monday, November 18 in which artist Tania Bruguera and members of the Asociación de Arte Útil gather to analyze case study projects from Chicago for entry into the Arte Útil archive. Participants include Stephen Wright (Environmental and Energy Study Institute, Paris), and Alistair Hudson and Leanne Greene (Asociación de Arte Útil and the Whitworth, Manchester, UK).

To RSVP, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/arte-util-useful-art-case-studies-from-the-chicago-area-tickets-72625309255?utm_source=Chicago+Architecture+Biennial+Signup&utm_campaign=78c0085f9c-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_03_11_10_30_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d763097230-78c0085f9c-270776245

 

Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan for 18 months to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 to the Summer of 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2019 to December 2019.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art

George Bellows, The Palisades, 1909. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.10
Event: “Reflecting on Histories”

Join poets and spoken word artists as they respond to Kara Walker’s 2019 Hyundai Commission. Artists include Bridget Minamore, Amaal Said, Rachel Long, and Linda Lebeija. This event is part of the Terra Foundation for American Art Series: New Perspectives. A common through line of New Perspectives is the use of the themes of identity and power to explore the narratives of artists of the United States. This series develops original research, generates debate, promotes the exchange of ideas, and contributes to an expanded view of American art and artists.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/hyundai-commission-kara-walker/reflecting-on-histories

 

Workshop: “Activism and Diaspora: American Art Histories”

Alexandra Chang (Rutgers University, Newark) and ShiPu Wang (University of California, Merced) co-convene an intensive academic workshop for scholars and curators to examine art activism through a global comparative lens. On Friday, December 6, and Saturday, December 7, the public is invited to join the conversation. Featured speakers include experts in Asian American, Latinx, Indigenous, and African American art, as well as Global Asias perspectives.

For more information, please visit:

http://apa.nyu.edu/event/activism-and-diaspora-american-art-histories/

Symposium: “Mel Bochner on Translation”

Mel Bochner has distinguished himself since the mid-1960s with his works and critical texts that are both generative and disruptive to institutional critical discourse. At this symposium, art historians and philosophers convene to open new perspectives on Bochner’s work, focusing on its formal and theoretical speculations about language and meaning that involve methods of interlinguistic and intersemiotic translation.  The December 6 symposium is followed by a research seminar on Saturday, December 7, at the Kandinsky Library, with Mel Bochner. This colloquium is organized by Art by Translation and the Kandinsky Library in collaboration with the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan and the Beaux-Arts de Paris.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.centrepompidou.fr/cpv/ressource.action?param.id=FR_R-42af47e7675472df378a1639fcd30b1&param.idSource=FR_E-42af47e7675472df378a1639fcd30b1

Symposium: “Pathways to Hartley”

This international symposium, organized in conjunction with the exhibition Marsden Hartley, offers a unique opportunity for scholars, students, and the public to learn more about the artist and his time. Five preeminent scholars from Europe and the United States will present their research on Hartley and his oeuvre, with an emphasis on the multitude of voices he used to express himself, both painterly and literary.

Speakers:

  • Rachael Z. DeLue, Princeton University
  • Edyta Frelik, Marie Curie-Sklodowka University
  • Jonathan D. Katz, University of Pennsylvania
  • Pascal Rousseau, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
  • Jacob Wamberg, Aarhus University

The symposium is co-organized by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art and the Terra Foundation for American Art. For more information, including the program and speaker’s abstracts, and to reserve, please visit: https://www.louisiana.dk/en/event/marsden-hartley-symposium-6122019

Panel: Black Arts, Black Power and the Birth of Kwanzaa

“Black Arts, Black Power and the Birth of Kwanzaa” explores the relationship between Kwanzaa and Chicago’s Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 70s through a panel conversation. Panelists include Black Arts poet and educator Dr. Haki Madhubuti and scholars of Chicago’s Black Arts Movement, including Rebecca Zorach (Mary Jane Crowe Professor in Art and Art History at Northwestern University); Romi Crawford (Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago); Tracie Hall (gallery owner and Director of the Joyce Foundation’s Culture Program); and Nedra Sims Fears (Executive Director of Greater Chatham Initiative).

For more information, visit http://www.greaterchathaminitiative.org/event/kwanzaa-on-the-9/

 

 

Event: “Performance: ELC TV Dinner E03”

Join artist collective East London Cable for this unique immersive performance. Inspired by Nam June Paik’s engagement with television, contributors showcase sound, moving image, dance, and performance works. The event will simultaneously be a screening, performance, and live broadcast.

This event is part of the Terra Foundation for American Art Series: New Perspectives. A common through line of New Perspectives is the use of the themes of identity and power to explore the narratives of artists of the United States. This series develops original research, generates debate, promotes the exchange of ideas, and contributes to an expanded view of American art and artists.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/nam-june-paik/performance-elc-tv-dinner-e03

Seminar: The 1947–49 Chicago Printer’s Strike and the History of Typography

Designer and scholar J. Dakota Brown presents his research, titled “The 1947–49 Chicago Printer’s Strike and the History of Typography.”

This program is part of Chicago: City of Commerce and Design, 1890–1990 at the Newberry Library, a scholarly seminar series exploring Chicago’s rich design legacy by focusing on the many ways that designers responded to the city’s shifting trends in manufacturing and corporate culture, and presented as part of Art Design Chicago. To RSVP, visit https://www.newberry.org/01162020-j-dakota-brown-northwestern-university

Exhibition: Signs and Wonders: The Photographs of John Beasley Greene

Over the course of his brief career, John Beasley Greene produced a body of pictures that advanced both archaeology and photography and that continues to offer insight into the central concerns that shaped the two fields. This exhibition, the first retrospective of this photographer, contextualizes Greene’s career through new scholarship, nearly 70 rare prints and albums, and Egyptian artwork from the Art Institute’s collection. This exhibition considers the complex aesthetic and political lenses that we use to look at photography and the past, as well as the complicated relationship between photography, colonialism, and modernism.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/9167/signs-and-wonders-the-photographs-of-john-beasley-greene

Exhibition: Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945

Mexico underwent a radical cultural transformation at the end of its Revolution in 1920. A new relationship between art and the public was established, giving rise to art that spoke directly to the people about social justice and national life. The model galvanized artists in the United States who were seeking to break free of European aesthetic domination to create publicly significant and accessible art. Numerous American artists traveled to Mexico, and the leading Mexican muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—spent extended periods of time in the United States, executing murals, paintings, and prints; exhibiting their work; and interacting with local artists.

With approximately 200 works by sixty Mexican and American artists, this exhibition demonstrates the impact Mexican artists had on their counterparts in the United States during this period and the ways in which their example inspired American artists both to create epic narratives about American history and everyday life, and to use their art to protest economic, social, and racial injustices.

For more information, please visit:

https://whitney.org/exhibitions/vida-americana

Seminar: Packaging Environments: The Art and Design Program at the Container Corporation of America

Known for funding and supporting the New Bauhaus in Chicago, the Container Corporation of America (CCA) had its own extensive art and design programs. In this presentation, Robin Lynch (PhD Candidate in Art History at McGill University) explores the CCA’s first poster program, led by designer Egbert Jacobson during the mid1930s to the early 1940s. By tracking themes such as natural resources, weather, and resilience which appear across posters, Lynch situates these environmental themes in relation to the beginnings of the CCA’s box industry and how design has historically served as a medium through which to construct and communicate space.

This program is part of Chicago: City of Commerce and Design, 1890–1990 at the Newberry Library, a scholarly seminar series exploring Chicago’s rich design legacy by focusing on the many ways that designers responded to the city’s shifting trends in manufacturing and corporate culture, and presented as part of Art Design Chicago. To RSVP, visit https://www.newberry.org/03122020-robin-lynch-mcgill-university

Collection Loan: American Cosmos: The Influence of Alexander von Humboldt on American Art and Culture

The exhibition Alexander von Humboldt and the United States: Art, Nature, and Culture explores the relationship between art and culture and America’s emerging identity, grounded in an appreciation of nature. From the Terra Foundation Collection, Gallery of the Louvre, by Samuel F. B. Morse is exhibited alongside more than 100 paintings, sculptures, maps, and artifacts. Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the exhibition is on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (8th and F Streets, NW), March 20, 2020–August 16, 2020.

For more information, please visit:

https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/humboldt

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831‒1833, oil on canvas, 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.51
Collection Loan: American Cosmos: The Influence of Alexander von Humboldt on American Art and Culture

Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the exhibition American Cosmos: The Influence of Alexander von Humboldt on American Art and Culture will include Samuel F. B. Morse’s Gallery of the Louvre from the Terra Collection of American Art.   American Cosmos will be the first major exhibition using art as a lens to examine the 19th century naturalist Alexander von Humboldt’s  influence on American cultural developments in science, visual arts, literature, politics, and exploration.

Samuel F. B. Morse’s Gallery of the Louvre will be on display at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, from March 20 – August 16, 2020.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.si.edu/exhibitions/alexander-von-humboldt-and-united-states-art-nature-and-culture-event-event-exhib-6470

 

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831‒1833, oil on canvas, 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.51
Seminar: Game Plans: Strategic Design and Positioning Methods in Chicago, 1970–

Strategic design—or the application of design methods to business planning and analysis—is a design specialization pioneered by Chicago-based industrial designer Jay Doblin (1920–1989), which saw the rise of a consumer-centered design practice. Drawing from design archives held in Brighton, Chicago, and London, Penelope Dean examines the inspirations and greater dissemination of Doblin’s game plans within an economic context and exposes the ways in which Chicago’s New Bauhaus gave way to a market-driven legacy of design practice.

This program is part of Chicago: City of Commerce and Design, 1890–1990 at the Newberry Library, a scholarly seminar series exploring Chicago’s rich design legacy by focusing on the many ways that designers responded to the city’s shifting trends in manufacturing and corporate culture, and presented as part of Art Design Chicago. To RSVP, visit https://www.newberry.org/05072020-penelope-dean-university-illinois-chicago

Collection Loan: Edward Hopper and the American Hotel

Edward Hopper and the American Hotel organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia, exhibits paintings and works on paper by Edward Hopper alongside rarely seen diaries and postcards.

From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Edward Hopper, Sierra Madre at Monterrey and Charles Demuth, Rue du Singe qui Pêche.  This exhibition is on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia, October 26, 2019–February 23, 2020 and Newfields, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, Indiana, June 7–September 13, 2020.

For more information, please visit:

https://discovernewfields.org/exhibitions

Edward Hopper, Sierra Madre at Monterrey, 1943, watercolor with touches of wiping, over a charcoal underdrawing, on heavyweight textured ivory wove watercolor paper, 21 1/4 x 29 3/4 in. (54.0 x 75.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.18
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