Terra Foundation-supported Events

Conference: “Anni Albers and the Modernist Textile”

This two-day conference will bring together scholars from academic institutions in the United Kingdom, the United States, Chile, Mexico, and Europe to discuss the critical significance of textiles within the modernist project. Focusing on the work of the 20th-century weaver Anni Albers (1899–1994), the conference aims to examine the afterlife of a Bauhaus weaving aesthetic as it was transformed across transnational networks of dialogue and dissemination. The conference also coincides with the end of the major Anni Albers retrospective at Tate Modern (closing at the end of January 2019) and with the centenary of the Bauhaus (1919–2019).

For more information, please visit:

https://www.annialbersmodernisttextile.com/

Collection Loan: Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment

The exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment explores ecological themes including Industrialization and environmental conservation, as well as shifts in American landscape painting. From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight and Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm.  Organized by  Princeton University Art Museum, this exhibition is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum, October 13, 2018–January 6, 2019; Peabody Essex Museum, February 2, 2019–May 5, 2019; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, May 25, 2019–September 9, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.pem.org/

 

Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight, 1866. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.57
Lecture: “Exile Modernism”

This lecture by Dr. Andrew Witt, Terra Foundation Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, addresses the photographic work of Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid undertaken in Los Angeles in the early 1940s. Although Deren and Hammid occupy an important place in the history of avant-garde film, noted for their collaboration Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), their photographic work appears as a blind spot in the history of art and photography. In order to provide shape and context to their work, Andrew Witt considers the writing of other European artists and writers who were exiled in Los Angeles. His paper is motivated by the belief that avant-garde activity encountered in Los Angeles at this moment proposes a new problematic to think through the formation of experimental photography, community, and migration in the history of American art.

The talk will be held at the Institut für Kunst- und Bildgeschichte (IKB), Room 0.12.

For more information, please visit: http://www.kunstgeschichte.hu-berlin.de/veranstaltungen/fellow-talk-dr-andrew-witt/.

Collection Loan: Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present and Future)

From the Terra Foundation Collection, Frederic Edwin Church’s, The Iceberg is exhibited in Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present and Future), organized by University of Colorado’s  CU Art Museum, Boulder, Colorado. This dialogue between American landscape painting and early scientific photography includes historical photographs from the archives of CU Boulder’s National Snow and Ice Data Center. Our Climate (Past, Present, Future) is the second exhibition in the 2018-19 series Documenting Change. The Iceberg will be exhibited  February 7–July 20, 2019.

For more information, please see:

https://www.colorado.edu/cuartmuseum/exhibitions/currently-view/documenting-change-our-climate-rockies

Frederic Edwin Church, The Iceberg, c. 1875, oil on canvas, 22 x 27 in. (55.9 x 68.6cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1993.6
Symposium: “International Perspectives on American Art”

Co-hosted by the Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies and the Art History Department at Johannes Gutenberg University, this event will consist of a one-day conference with scholars from Europe and the US and a one-day workshop for undergraduate and graduates students. The gatherings will bring together early Americanist scholars from North America and Europe in conversation around transatlantic perspectives on developments in the field of early American studies.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.obama-institute.com/international-perspectives-on-american-art/

Exhibition: Pattern and Decoration: Ornament as Promise

Co-organized by Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst (Ludwig Forum) and the Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Vienna (mumok), Pattern and Decoration: Ornament as Promise provides a comprehensive survey of the Pattern and Decoration movement (1975–1985) in the United States, which emerged among artists committed to feminist causes. This exhibition features works with wallpaper-like patterns, decorative ornamentation, and aggressively colorful compositions. Optimistic and progressive, Pattern and Decoration questioned traditional notions of art while also broaching larger sociopolitical themes in the global art scene.

This exhibition was previously at Ludwig Forum.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.mumok.at/en/events/pattern-and-decoration

Lecture: “‘Art knows no geographical lines’: The influence of Edwardian British artists on Pittsburgh’s Carnegie International exhibitions”

In this paper, Alison Clarke, 2018–19 Terra Foundation-Paul Mellon Centre Fellow, explores the relationship between British artists and the annual International exhibition established at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Institute in 1896.

Until the advent of the First World War, the International provided a forum for the American exhibition of works by British artists such as Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Frank Brangwyn, and John Macallen Swan. In return, these artists offered guidance to the Institute on how to negotiate the British art scene, as well as acting as judges on the International Jury established to award exhibition prizes. In particular, landscape painter Alfred East established a firm friendship with Carnegie Museum Director John W. Beatty, detailed in the numerous letters exchanged between the pair. East visited Pittsburgh on multiple occasions, selling works to American buyers and producing watercolors on trips up the coast to Connecticut. This previously unexplored link between British artists and an American museum provides an illuminating snapshot of transatlantic artistic interchange in the Edwardian period.

For more information and to book tickets, please visit: https://www.paul-mellon-centre.ac.uk/whats-on/forthcoming/terra-pmc-fellowship.

Seminar: “‘Luminism’: Museums and the Production of Knowledge”

“Luminism” is a term that in the 1960s was deployed to designate and define a school of mid-nineteenth century American landscape painting as nationally and artistically significant. It raised a group of hitherto minor painters to prominence and designated them as the most important, distinctively American contribution to the art of the United States of the entire century. By the late 1980s, however, no academic scholar used the term. In this paper, Bruce Robertson (Professor of Art & Architecture and Director of Art, Design & Architecture Museum, University of California, Santa Barbara) will examine the critical role museums played in the production of the canon of American art, and the interaction among academic scholarship, museums, and markets, within the framework of national political developments. Analyzing the success and failure of “luminism,” he will consider the strength and limits of museums to shape canons, and suggest some other examples worth examining. American art has a particular value in examining the knowledge work that museums do because the growth of American art is exactly coincident with the development of the public museum.

The seminar will be held in room MA 331.

Exhibition: Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975

This exhibition explores how American artists responded to international conflict during the 1960s and 70s, and how art about the Vietnam War influenced contemporary artistic practice. Works in a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, print, performance, and body art—reveal how artists engaged with ideas of conscience and civic engagement. Art by Dan Flavin (1933–1996), Leon Golub (1922–2004), Philip Guston (1913–1980), Donald Judd (1928–1994), Edward Kienholz (1927–1994), Faith Ringgold (b. 1930), Martha Rosler (b. 1943), Peter Saul (b. 1934), Nancy Spero (1926–2009), and others illustrates how artists addressed violence, power, vulnerability, empathy, sacrifice, mourning, and resistance.

For more information, please visit:

https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/vietnam

Exhibition / Terra Collection Initiative: Atelier 17 and Printmaking in Brazil and the United States, 1900-1950

Co-organized by Museu De Arte Contemporânea da Universidade de São Paulo (MAC-USP), and the Terra Foundation for American Art, this exhibition will be the first presentation of the collection of modern American prints donated by Nelson Rockefeller in 1950, and American prints donated by the collector Lessing J. Rosenwald in 1956.   Atelier 17 and Printmaking in Brazil and the United States, 1900-1950 includes early twentieth-century American prints, contextualized with modern prints by Brazilian artists such as Geraldo de Barros, Fayga Ostrower, and Livio Abramo who had direct ties to Atelier 17.  The exhibition examines the intricate network of international exchange between artists, curators, collectors, and audiences in Brazil and the United States.

Works from the Terra Foundation for American Art:

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mac.usp.br/mac/conteudo/exp/atuais/masterpager.asp

 

Stanley William Hayter, Cinq Personnages, 1946. Engraving, soft-ground etching and scorper, silkscreen (printed in three colors: orange, turquoise-green and red-violet) on thick Kochi paper, Plate: 14 3/4 x 23 7/8 in. (37.5 x 60.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1995.37
Collection Loan: Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment 

The exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment explores ecological themes including Industrialization and environmental conservation, as well as shifts in American landscape painting. From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight and Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm.  Organized by  Princeton University Art Museum, this exhibition is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum, October 13, 2018–January 6, 2019; Peabody Essex Museum, February 2, 2019–May 5, 2019; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, May 25, 2019–September 9, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

https://crystalbridges.org

Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight, 1866. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.57
Collection Loan:William J. Glackens and Pierre-August Renoir: Affinities and Distinctions

From the collection of the Terra Foundation for American Art, Julia’s Sister  by William Glackens is exhibited in William J. Glackens and Pierre-August Renoir: Affinities and Distinctions.  This work is exhibited alongside works by Renoir,  situated in themes of American and European modernism.

This exhibition will be on view at the NSU Art Museum, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, October 21, 2018–May 5, 2019; and the Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN, June 21–September 21, 2019.

 

For more details, please see:  http://www.huntermuseum.org/exhibitions

 

William Glackens, Julia’s Sister, c. 1915, oil on canvas, 32 1/8 x 26 1/8 in. (81.6 x 66.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.58