Terra Foundation-supported Events

Dialogue: “Art & Graphic Design: Maciunas, Ruscha, and Levrant de Bretteville”

In this dialogue with Sophie Cras, Benoît Buquet will extend the hypotheses of his book Graphics. Art et design graphique aux États-Unis (1960–1980) (PUFR, coll. Iconotextes, 2019). Focusing on works primarily by George Maciunas, Ed Ruscha, and Sheila Levrant de Breteville, the book explores the understudied intersections between art and graphic design through in-depth case studies supported by new archival evidence. It also to takes a fresh look at Fluxus, Pop art, and feminist art practices. Considering the book’s focus, the specificity of the author’s collaboration with graphic designers Alaric Garnier and Léna Araguas on this publication’s design will also be discussed.

Speakers:

  • Benoît Buquet, Associate Professor, Université de Tours
  • Sophie Cras, Associate Professor, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

This event is free and open to the public. It will be held in French. Please RSVP to: [email protected]

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2020 to December 2020.

For more information, please visit:  http://www.artic.edu/

Lilly Martin Spencer, The Home of the Red, White and Blue, c. 1867‒1868, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. (61 x 76.2 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2007.1
Exhibition: Signs and Wonders: The Photographs of John Beasley Greene

Over the course of his brief career, John Beasley Greene produced a body of pictures that advanced both archaeology and photography and that continues to offer insight into the central concerns that shaped the two fields. This exhibition, the first retrospective of this photographer, contextualizes Greene’s career through new scholarship, nearly 70 rare prints and albums, and Egyptian artwork from the Art Institute’s collection. This exhibition considers the complex aesthetic and political lenses that we use to look at photography and the past, as well as the complicated relationship between photography, colonialism, and modernism.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/9167/signs-and-wonders-the-photographs-of-john-beasley-greene

Exhibition: Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945

Mexico underwent a radical cultural transformation at the end of its Revolution in 1920. A new relationship between art and the public was established, giving rise to art that spoke directly to the people about social justice and national life. The model galvanized artists in the United States who were seeking to break free of European aesthetic domination to create publicly significant and accessible art. Numerous American artists traveled to Mexico, and the leading Mexican muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—spent extended periods of time in the United States, executing murals, paintings, and prints; exhibiting their work; and interacting with local artists.

With approximately 200 works by sixty Mexican and American artists, this exhibition demonstrates the impact Mexican artists had on their counterparts in the United States during this period and the ways in which their example inspired American artists both to create epic narratives about American history and everyday life, and to use their art to protest economic, social, and racial injustices.

For more information, please visit:

https://whitney.org/exhibitions/vida-americana

Collection Loan: Duro Olowu: Seeing Chicago

From the Terra Collection for American Art, Marsden Hartley’s, Painting No. 50 is exhibited in Duro Olowu: Seeing Chicago organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.  Curated by Olowu, the exhibition reimagines relationships between artists and objects across time, media, and geography.

For more information, please visit:

https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2020/Duro-Olowu-Seeing-Chicago

 

Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 50, 1914–15, oil on canvas, 47 x 47 in. (119.4 x 119.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2020 to December 2020.

For more information, please visit:  http://www.artic.edu/

Lilly Martin Spencer, The Home of the Red, White and Blue, c. 1867‒1868, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. (61 x 76.2 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2007.1
Seminar: Packaging Environments: The Art and Design Program at the Container Corporation of America

Known for funding and supporting the New Bauhaus in Chicago, the Container Corporation of America (CCA) had its own extensive art and design programs. In this presentation, Robin Lynch (PhD Candidate in Art History at McGill University) explores the CCA’s first poster program, led by designer Egbert Jacobson during the mid1930s to the early 1940s. By tracking themes such as natural resources, weather, and resilience which appear across posters, Lynch situates these environmental themes in relation to the beginnings of the CCA’s box industry and how design has historically served as a medium through which to construct and communicate space.

This program is part of Chicago: City of Commerce and Design, 1890–1990 at the Newberry Library, a scholarly seminar series exploring Chicago’s rich design legacy by focusing on the many ways that designers responded to the city’s shifting trends in manufacturing and corporate culture, and presented as part of Art Design Chicago. To RSVP, visit https://www.newberry.org/03122020-robin-lynch-mcgill-university

Collection Loan: American Cosmos: The Influence of Alexander von Humboldt on American Art and Culture

The exhibition Alexander von Humboldt and the United States: Art, Nature, and Culture explores the relationship between art and culture and America’s emerging identity, grounded in an appreciation of nature. From the Terra Foundation Collection, Gallery of the Louvre, by Samuel F. B. Morse is exhibited alongside more than 100 paintings, sculptures, maps, and artifacts. Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the exhibition is on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (8th and F Streets, NW), March 20, 2020–August 16, 2020.

For more information, please visit:

https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/humboldt

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831‒1833, oil on canvas, 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.51
Seminar: Game Plans: Strategic Design and Positioning Methods in Chicago, 1970–

Strategic design—or the application of design methods to business planning and analysis—is a design specialization pioneered by Chicago-based industrial designer Jay Doblin (1920–1989), which saw the rise of a consumer-centered design practice. Drawing from design archives held in Brighton, Chicago, and London, Penelope Dean examines the inspirations and greater dissemination of Doblin’s game plans within an economic context and exposes the ways in which Chicago’s New Bauhaus gave way to a market-driven legacy of design practice.

This program is part of Chicago: City of Commerce and Design, 1890–1990 at the Newberry Library, a scholarly seminar series exploring Chicago’s rich design legacy by focusing on the many ways that designers responded to the city’s shifting trends in manufacturing and corporate culture, and presented as part of Art Design Chicago. To RSVP, visit https://www.newberry.org/05072020-penelope-dean-university-illinois-chicago

Collection Loan: Edward Hopper and the American Hotel

Edward Hopper and the American Hotel organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia, exhibits paintings and works on paper by Edward Hopper alongside rarely seen diaries and postcards.

From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Edward Hopper, Sierra Madre at Monterrey and Charles Demuth, Rue du Singe qui Pêche.  This exhibition is on view at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia, October 26, 2019–February 23, 2020 and Newfields, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, Indiana, June 7–September 13, 2020.

For more information, please visit:

https://discovernewfields.org/exhibitions

Edward Hopper, Sierra Madre at Monterrey, 1943, watercolor with touches of wiping, over a charcoal underdrawing, on heavyweight textured ivory wove watercolor paper, 21 1/4 x 29 3/4 in. (54.0 x 75.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.18