Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Picture Fiction: Kenneth Josephson and Contemporary Photography

Chicago conceptual photographer Kenneth Josephson (b. 1932) has spent his career scrutinizing photography’s inherent reproducibility and circulation, making use of a mass-cultural archive of images, and mastering self-reflexive, often humorous devices–methods undoubtedly a result of Josephson’s years at the Institute of Design, where as a student he studied under Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. He afterward went on to teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for nearly forty years. Examining Josephson’s production from roughly 1960–1980, Picture Fiction focuses on his four main, ongoing series: Images within Images, Marks and Evidence, History of Photography Series, and Archaeological Series. Largely drawn from the MCA Chicago’s permanent collection, the exhibition reveals concerns shared by Josephson and conceptual artists emerging in the 1960s, and moreover, draws parallels between his practice and contemporary artists.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Picture-Fiction-Kenneth-Josephson-And-Contemporary-Photography

Exhibition: South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980

During the 1960s and 1970s, Chicago was shaped by art and ideas produced and circulated on the South Side. Yet the history of the period’s creative and social ferment has often remained segregated by the city’s social, political, and geographic divides. South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980—organized by the Smart Museum in collaboration with the DuSable Museum of African American History and presented concurrently with South Side Stories: Holdings at the DuSable—takes a nuanced look at the cultural history of Chicago’s South Side during this momentous era of change and conflict, with a focus on artists of the Black Arts Movement. Through nearly 100 objects, the show upends dominant narratives of the period and unearths rich stories by examining watershed cultural moments from the Hairy Who to the Wall of Respect, from the Civil Rights movement to the AfriCOBRA, from vivid protest posters to visionary outsider art, and from the Free University movement to the radical jazz of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/south-side-stories-rethinking-chicago-art/

Exhibition: Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow

Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow explores Chicago’s history of robust recognition and early acceptance of self-taught and outsider art and artists. The exhibition presents intrinsic themes embodied in the works of 12 artists, including Chicago icons, Henry Darger, Lee Godie, Joseph Yoakum, and others. Themes found in several artists’ works and represented here include the psychologically-charged tension in oppositions and contradictions; interaction between high style and the vernacular, between nature and culture; drawing on memory and the expressive use of line and form as a survival mechanism; immigration and/or relocation as a defining experience; surviving the African American experience; and the power of portraiture as a view into society, psyche, and soul.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.art.org/chicago-calling-art-against-the-flow

Exhibition: 3–D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980

3-D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980 examines the little-known sculptural work and dimensional painting made by the Chicago Imagists during the early years of their practice. As the first in-depth exploration of the overall affinity of Imagist artists for objects, the exhibition features artists who worked individually to craft unique approaches, but who shared key influences, such as Surrealism and the Surrealist objects. In addition to members of the original Imagist groups, the exhibition includes work by Don Baum, the chief curator of the Imagist moment; Ray Yoshida, the teacher with whom many Imagists studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; as well as H.C. Westermann, arguably the point of origin for the exhibition.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://tang.skidmore.edu/exhibitions/238-3-d-doings-the-imagist-object-in-chicago-art-1964-1980

Exhibition: Todros Geller: Strange Worlds

Todros Geller: Strange Worlds focuses on the multifaceted oeuvre of Todros Geller (1889–1949), an influential Chicago artist and central figure in the history of modern American Jewish art. Born in Ukraine, Geller immigrated to Chicago in 1918, which remained his home until his death. An active proponent of the concept of Jewish art, he served as a mentor to numerous Chicago Jewish artists and as a prominent educator, first as a teacher at the Jewish People’s Institute and Jane Addams Hull House, then as supervisor of art for the College of Jewish Studies (later Spertus Institute) and acting director of The Jewish Museum in Chicago. In both work and life, Geller reflected the prevailing social, political, and artistic concerns of his time, while remaining intimately entwined with Chicago’s evolving Jewish community and its efforts to establish, maintain, and promote Jewish identity.

This exhibition draws from the unique holdings from the Spertus Institute’s collection to survey the broad scope of Geller’s creative endeavors. In addition to a broad range of paintings, prints, and works on paper, the collection includes an extensive archive of Geller’s personal materials, encompassing preparatory sketches, letters, books, postcards, periodicals, news articles, photographs, posters, book illustrations, and bookplates. Todros Geller: Strange Worlds draws on these unique resources—the majority on view for the first time—to examine the public and private concerns that animated Geller’s work throughout his career.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.spertus.edu/exhibitions/strange-worlds

Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: Pathways to Modernism: American Art, 1865–1945

Pathways to Modernism: American Art, 1865–1945 is the first major exhibition collaboration between the Art Institute of Chicago and the Terra Foundation for American Art. Featuring 78 paintings and works on paper, this thematic exhibition explores the many paths by which American art became modern through its engagement with the political, economic, and cultural developments that transformed the nature of daily life, as well as modes of art making during this tumultuous period.

Pathways to Modernism includes 43 works from the Terra Foundation collection by artists such as Frederic Edwin Church, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Theodore Robinson, William Merritt Chase, Arthur Dove, Helen Torr, Charles Demuth, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Edward Hopper.

Pathways to Modernism will be accompanied by public programming and an exhibition catalogue published in Chinese and English.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.shanghaimuseum.net/museum/frontend/en/display/exhibition-info-out-line.action

Patrick Henry Bruce, Peinture, 1917–18, oil and graphite on canvas, 25 5/8 x 32 1/8in. (65.1 x 81.6cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.21
Collection Loan: Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment

The exhibition Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment explores ecological themes including Industrialization and environmental conservation, as well as shifts in American landscape painting. From the Terra Foundation Collection, two works are exhibited, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight and Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm.  Organized by  Princeton University Art Museum, this exhibition is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum, October 13, 2018–January 6, 2019; Peabody Essex Museum, February 2, 2019–May 5, 2019; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, May 25, 2019–September 9, 2019.

For more information, please visit:

http://artmuseum.princeton.edu/art/exhibitions/2818

 

Sanford Robinson Gifford, Hunter Mountain, Twilight, 1866. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.57
Exhibition: Richard Pousette-Dart: Beginnings

Cambridge University’s art gallery, Kettle’s Yard, presents Richard Pousette-Dart: Beginnings. This exhibition re-assesses Richard Pousette-Dart’s (1916–1992) contributions to the development of Abstract Expressionism while also examining the artist’s over 40-year friendship with Kettle’s Yard founder, Jim Ede, whose collection forms the basis of this museum. Although usually recognized for his painting, Pousette-Dart’s experiments in drawing, sculpture and photography will be featured, focusing on his formative practice during the mid-1930s to the late-1940s.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk/events/richard-pousette-dart-beginnings/

 

Exhibition/Collection Loan: John Singer Sargent

The exhibition John Singer Sargent explores Sargent’s relationship with Scandinavian art around 1900, including society portraits, as well as portraits of children, artists, and friends; landscapes; and genre scenes. Noted in the provenance, the painting  Parisian Beggar Girl (c. 1880), from the Terra Foundation collection and included in the exhibition, was a gift from Sargent to Albert Edelfelt, a Finnish painter also included in the exhibition.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.nationalmuseum.se/en/utst%C3%A4llningar/kommande-utst%C3%A4llningar/john-singer-sargent

John Singer Sargent, A Parisian Beggar Girl, c. 1880, oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 17 3/16 in. (64.5 x 43.7 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1994.14
Exhibition: Pattern and Decoration: Ornament as Promise

Co-organized by the Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst (Ludwig Forum) and the Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Vienna (mumok), Pattern and Decoration: Ornament as Promise presents a comprehensive survey of the American Pattern and Decoration movement (1975–1985), which emerged among artists committed to feminist causes. This exhibition showcases artwork with wallpaper-like patterns, decorative ornamentation, and aggressively colorful compositions. Artists include Robert S. Zakanitch (b. 1940), Miriam Schapiro (1923–2015), Valerie Jaudon (b. 1954), Joyce Kozloff (b. 1942), and Kim MacConnel (b. 1948), among others. Optimistic and progressive, these artists questioned traditional notions of art while also broaching larger sociopolitical themes in the global art scene, including the position of women, Native Americans, and ethnic minorities.

For more information, please visit:
http://ludwigforum.de/en/event/pattern-and-decoration/

Exhibition: Anni Albers

Co-organized by the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and the Tate Modern, London, Anni Albers showcases the multifaceted weaver’s long career. Albers (1899–1994) studied during the 1920s at the Bauhaus School. After emigrating to the United States, with her husband Josef Albers, she taught at Black Mountain College. At the center of her creative achievement are her woven images, characterized by complex textile structures, abstraction, and subtle coloration.

The exhibition is also on view at K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf (June 9–September 9, 2019)

For more information, please visit:
https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/anni-albers

Exhibition: Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing

Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing draws attention to the documentary photographer Dorothea Lange (1895–1965) and how she used photography as an instrument of social change. Best known for her iconic 1936 image Migrant Mother, Lange’s career spanned more than four decades. This exhibition presents Lange’s Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographs, her images of the WWII-era internment of Japanese Americans, and her “New California” series, depicting environmental change in that state.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.jeudepaume.org/index.php?page=article&idArt=3059

Exhibition: Harvey Quaytman: Against the Static

The UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) presents Harvey Quaytman: Against the Static, a retrospective of the four-decade career of abstract painter Harvey Quaytman (1937–2002). Quaytman’s work resides at the juncture of Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Process Art, and Constructivism—where considerations of line, distilled geometric forms, materiality, atmosphere, and texture merge. Strongly influenced by the work of Kazimir Malevich (1878–1935), Piet Mondrian (1872–1944), and Henri Matisse (1869–1954), Quaytman’s work reveals the interplay between earlier strands of European Modernism and American post-war abstraction, pushing the formal and conceptual boundaries of abstract painting.

For more information, please visit:
https://bampfa.org/program/harvey-quaytman-against-static

 

Exhibition: Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power presents the work made by leading African American artists between 1963 and 1983. Bringing together more than 150 objects from private and public collections, the exhibition features paintings, collages, photographs, prints, and sculpture. The exhibition considers the different ways in which approximately fifty artists from across the US—including Norman Lewis (1909–1979), Romare Bearden (1911–1988), Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), Wadsworth Jarrell (b. 1929), Betye Saar (b. 1926), Faith Ringgold (b. 1930), John Outterbridge (b. 1933), and Sam Gilliam (b. 1933)—understood what it meant to be Black within their artistic practice.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/soul_of_a_nation

Exhibition: Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit

In the early 20th century, images of Inuit people became a source of fascination to the American and European public and artists alike, including French artist Henri Matisse (1869–1954) and his Surrealist contemporaries. The exhibition, Yua (a term from the Central Yup’ik language spoken in Alaska that means “parallel” and is also commonly understood as defining a spirit or soul), presents masks and drawings by Alaskan Natives alongside the work of Matisse. The exhibition explores the spiritual universe of Alaskan natives by reuniting 40 pairs of masks that have been apart since leaving their originating communities more than a century ago.

For more information, please visit:
https://matisse.heard.org

Exhibition: Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor

Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor illuminates how Alexander Calder’s (1898–1976) disruption of both conventional hierarchies of fine art and the boundaries between utilitarian and aesthetic objects gave him the freedom to develop novel approaches within a range of media. This comprehensive exhibition includes a variety of key works by Calder, including sculptures, drawings performances, and jewelry.

This exhibition will also be on view at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (April 5, 2019–August 4, 2019) and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (September 13, 2019–January 12, 2020). More information is forthcoming.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.mbam.qc.ca/en/exhibitions/upcoming/calder/

 

Exhibition: Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein

This exhibition explores the impact of groundbreaking scientific discoveries on American and European artists in the 20th century. Hungarian poet Charles Sirató’s 1936 “Dimensionist Manifesto” declared that artists should strive to respond to the scientific revolutions going on around them. Artists in dialogue with Dimensionism explored these revolutions in their practice, engaging with physics, astronomy, and microbiology. The show brings together works by those who either signed or drew inspiration from the Dimensionist Manifesto, including such artists as Alexander Calder (1898–1976), Joseph Cornell (1903–1972), Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968), Helen Lundeberg (1908–1999), Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988), and Man Ray (1890–1976).

This exhibition will travel next to the Mead Art Museum (March 28–July 28, 2019). For more information, please visit:

https://bampfa.org/program/dimensionism-modern-art-age-einstein

Exhibition/Collection Loan: Americans Abroad: Landscape and Artistic Exchange, 1800-1920

Organized by the Eskenazi Museum of Art, at Indiana University, Bloomington, and the Tsinghua University Art Museum, Americans Abroad: Landscape and Artistic Exchange, 1800–1920 showcases American and European paintings dating from the late eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century to address the affinities and influences between American and European art.

Included in the exhibition are seven works from the Terra Foundation collection:

For more information, please visit:
http://www.artmuseum.tsinghua.edu.cn/en/cpsj_english/zlxx/zzzl/lszl/

Lyonel Feininger, Denstedt, 1917, Oil on canvas, 34 3/8 x 46 5/8 in. (87.3 x 118.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1988.27
Collection Loan: Once upon a Time in America: Three Centuries of US American Art

This large survey exhibition is dedicated to US American art from 1650 to 1950. The show begins with works extending from the colonial era to the masters of American Realism, and ends with examples of Abstract Expressionism. For its exhibition Once Upon a Time in America, the Wallraf -Richartz is bringing to Köln over 120 loans from the most celebrated collections and museums in the United States and Europe. The majority have never or only rarely be seen in Germany. From the Terra Foundation Collection, four works are exhibited, Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, John Haberle, One Dollar Bill, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Morning in the Hudson, Haverstraw Bay and Robert Henri, Figure in Motion.  Organized by the Wallraf-Richartz Museum & Fondation Corboud this exhibition is on view November 23, 2018–March 24, 2019

For more information, please visit:
https://www.wallraf.museum/en/exhibitions/preview/2018-11-13-amerika/

John Haberle, One Dollar Bill, 1890. Oil on canvas, 8 × 10 in. (20.3 × 25.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2015.4