Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Robert Morris. The Perceiving Body

In contrast to the survey model, this exhibition focuses on Robert Morris’s work made between the early 1960s and late 1970s—most, if not all, of which are considered key works of Minimal and Post-minimal art. The selected works address an artistic practice that contributed to the transformation of art making in an era of political turmoil and profound historical change.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.mudam.com/exhibitions/the-perceiving-body

 

Collection Loan: Duro Olowu: Seeing Chicago

From the Terra Collection for American Art, Marsden Hartley’s, Painting No. 50 is exhibited in Duro Olowu: Seeing Chicago organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.  Curated by Olowu, the exhibition reimagines relationships between artists and objects across time, media, and geography.

For more information, please visit:

https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2020/Duro-Olowu-Seeing-Chicago

 

Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 50, 1914–15, oil on canvas, 47 x 47 in. (119.4 x 119.4 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61
Exhibition: Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945

Mexico underwent a radical cultural transformation at the end of its Revolution in 1920. A new relationship between art and the public was established, giving rise to art that spoke directly to the people about social justice and national life. The model galvanized artists in the United States who were seeking to break free of European aesthetic domination to create publicly significant and accessible art. Numerous American artists traveled to Mexico, and the leading Mexican muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—spent extended periods of time in the United States, executing murals, paintings, and prints; exhibiting their work; and interacting with local artists.

With approximately 200 works by sixty Mexican and American artists, this exhibition demonstrates the impact Mexican artists had on their counterparts in the United States during this period and the ways in which their example inspired American artists both to create epic narratives about American history and everyday life, and to use their art to protest economic, social, and racial injustices.

For more information, please visit:

https://whitney.org/exhibitions/vida-americana

Exhibition: Edward Hopper

This exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s landscape and cityscape paintings. This focus on landscape offers a unique angle on the American painter’s work. In the art-historical tradition, landscape has always implied humankind’s impact on nature, and Hopper’s paintings reflect this in a subtle and multifaceted way through non-picturesque depictions. The show includes  oil paintings, drawings, and watercolors, ranging in date from the early 1910s to the 1960s.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.fondationbeyeler.ch/en/exhibitions/edward-hopper/

Exhibition: Signs and Wonders: The Photographs of John Beasley Greene

Over the course of his brief career, John Beasley Greene produced a body of pictures that advanced both archaeology and photography and that continues to offer insight into the central concerns that shaped the two fields. This exhibition, the first retrospective of this photographer, contextualizes Greene’s career through new scholarship, nearly 70 rare prints and albums, and Egyptian artwork from the Art Institute’s collection. This exhibition considers the complex aesthetic and political lenses that we use to look at photography and the past, as well as the complicated relationship between photography, colonialism, and modernism.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/9167/signs-and-wonders-the-photographs-of-john-beasley-greene

Terra Collection Initiative: Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours: The Life and Legacy of Judith Sargent Murray

From the Terra Foundation Collection, Portrait of Mrs. John Stevens (Judith Sargent, later Mrs. John Murray) from 1770–72, by John Singleton Copley is exhibited at the Cape Ann Museum.  Co-organized by the Terra Foundation for American Art, the Cape Ann Museum, and The Sargent House Museum, the exhibition Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours: The Life and Legacy of Judith Sargent Murray  focuses on the contributions and legacy of writer, philosopher, and woman’s rights advocate Judith Sargent Murray (1751–1820).  The portrait of Judith Sargent Murray is featured alongside manuscripts, letters, and personal artifacts.

The exhibition coincides with the 100th anniversary of the founding of The Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours: The Life and Legacy of Judith Sargent Murray  is on display at the Cape Ann Museum Gloucester, Massachusetts  September 28, 2019–November 8, 2020.  (This exhibition has been extended from an original closing date March 31, 2020)

For more information visit: https://www.capeannmuseum.org/exhibitions/our-souls-are-nature-equal-yours-legacy-judith-sargent-murray/

John Singleton Copley, Portrait of Mrs. John Stevens (Judith Sargent, later Mrs. John Murray), 1770–1772, oil on canvas, 50 x 40 in. (127.0 x 101.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 2000.6