Terra Foundation-supported Events

Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.
This installation is ongoing, January 2020 to December 2020.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artic.edu/

Max Weber, Construction, 1915, oil on canvas, 22 7/8 x 27 7/8 in. (58.1 x 70.8 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1987.31
Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 through 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99
Exhibition: Mapping the Collection

The exhibition Mapping the Collection takes a new look at two influential decades in the history of US art: the 1960s and 1970s. Through a selection of artworks from the Museum Ludwig’s permanent collection as well as several key loans, the exhibition explores issues of equality, indigenous self-determination, women’s rights, and Black Power. The political and social context of these two decades form the background against which individual artistic response is studied. In turn, the exhibition questions a Western European conception and reception of American art.

This exhibition is the result of the Terra Foundation Research Fellowship in American Art at the Museum Ludwig.

For more information, please visit: https://www.museum-ludwig.de/en/exhibitions/mapping-the-collection.html.

Terra Collection Initiative: Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours: The Life and Legacy of Judith Sargent Murray

From the Terra Foundation Collection, Portrait of Mrs. John Stevens (Judith Sargent, later Mrs. John Murray) from 1770–72, by John Singleton Copley is exhibited at the Cape Ann Museum.  Co-organized by the Terra Foundation for American Art, the Cape Ann Museum, and The Sargent House Museum, the exhibition Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours: The Life and Legacy of Judith Sargent Murray  focuses on the contributions and legacy of writer, philosopher, and woman’s rights advocate Judith Sargent Murray (1751–1820).  The portrait of Judith Sargent Murray is featured alongside manuscripts, letters, and personal artifacts.

The exhibition coincides with the 100th anniversary of the founding of The Sargent House Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Our Souls are by Nature Equal to Yours: The Life and Legacy of Judith Sargent Murray  is on display at the Cape Ann Museum Gloucester, Massachusetts  September 28, 2019–November 8, 2020.  (This exhibition has been extended from an original closing date March 31, 2020)

For more information visit: https://www.capeannmuseum.org/exhibitions/our-souls-are-nature-equal-yours-legacy-judith-sargent-murray/

John Singleton Copley, Portrait of Mrs. John Stevens (Judith Sargent, later Mrs. John Murray), 1770–1772, oil on canvas, 50 x 40 in. (127.0 x 101.6 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 2000.6
Exhibition/Collection Loan: Alexander von Humboldt and the United States: Art, Nature, and Culture

The exhibition positions Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt’s ties to the United States as a crucial factor in the construction of American cultural identity and visual arts. Humboldt’s work influenced many American artists and thinkers in the 19th century. Through a careful selection of paintings, sculpture, works on paper, and selected maps, documents, and natural history artifacts, the exhibition examines Humboldt’s century-long influence on five spheres of American cultural development: the visual arts, sciences, literature, politics, and exploration. Works by many artists of the United States will be featured, including the Gallery of the Louvre by Samuel F.B. Morse from the TFAA collection.

For more information, including re-opening dates and times, please visit:

https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/humboldt

Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831‒1833, oil on canvas, 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.51
Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: The Studio of Nature, 1860-1910: The Terra Collection in Context

The Studio of Nature, 1860-1910: The Terra Collection in Context (L’atelier de la Nature, 1860-1910. Invitation à la Terra Collection) is co-organized by the Musée des impressionnisme Giverny and the Terra Foundation for American Art. The exhibition  assembles 89 paintings, prints and photographs, including 62 works from the Terra Foundation and works from the collections of the musée des impressionnisme Giverny, the Musée d’Orsay,  the Bibliothèque nationale de France and the Société de Géographie, Paris.

The Studio of Nature, 1860-1910: The Terra Collection in Context will be accompanied by public programming and an exhibition catalogue published in French.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.mdig.fr/en/studio-nature-1860-1910

Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm, c. 1871, oil on canvas, 15 1/4 x 30 1/8 in. (38.7 x 76.5 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.68