Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: The Essential Duchamp

The Essential Duchamp presents Marcel Duchamp’s (1887–1968) life and work through the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The exhibition provides a survey of the artist and emphasizes his sustained efforts to eliminate the boundary between art and life. Traveling to the Tokyo National Museum, National Museum of Modern Art South Korea, and the Art Gallery of New South Whales, this exhibition will be the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to Duchamp to be presented in these regions.

This exhibition was previously on view at the Tokyo National Museum and National Museum of Modern Art, Korea.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/essential-duchamp/

Exhibition: Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor

Featuring over 100 key works, this exhibition will illuminate Alexander Calder’s (1898–1976) disruption of the conventional hierarchies and boundaries of fine art. This comprehensive exhibition will follow the breadth of Calder’s work through a variety of media, including sculpture, drawing, performance, and jewelry. His art will be complemented by films, photographs, and other documentation that will demonstrate the artist’s unique inventions and situate his works in their contemporary settings.

This exhibition was previously at Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and will travel next to the Smithsonian American Art Museum (September 13, 2019–January 12, 2020).

For more information, please visit:

www.ngv.vic.gov.au/exhibition/alexander-calder/

Exhibition: Chicago: foyer d’art brut

La Halle Saint Pierre in Paris presents Chicago: foyer d’art brut, or “Chicago: a home for outsider art,” an exhibition showcasing the work of 10 outsider artists—Henry Darger, William Dawson, Lee Godie, Mr. Imagination, Aldo Piacenza, Pauline Simon, Drossos Skyllas, Dr. Charles Smith, Wesley Willis, and Joseph Yoakum—who lived and worked in Chicago.

Overall, the exhibition highlights Chicago’s history of robust recognition and acceptance of self-taught art and artists by unearthing the common themes throughout the artists’ bodies of work in addition to the commingled histories of the curators, dealers, collectors, and appreciators who embraced outsider art genre in Chicago.

The exhibition is curated by Kenneth C. Burkhart (independent curator) and Lisa Stone (Curator of the Roger Brown Study Collection of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) and was originally presented at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art from June 29, 2018–February 10, 2019. It travels to Kunsthaus Kaufbeuren (Kaufbeuren, Germany, October 10, 2019–January 26, 2020), Collection de l’Art Brut (Lausanne, March 12– August 30, 2020) and the Outsider Art Museum (Amsterdam, October 7, 2020–May 24, 2021).

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago. For more information:

http://www.hallesaintpierre.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/DP-CHICAGO-1.pdf

Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan for 18 months to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 to the Summer of 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2019 to December 2019.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Beauford Delaney,untitled (Village Street Scene), 1948. Oil on canvas, Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 2018.2
Exhibition: Participatory Arts: Crafting Social Change

Jane Addams Hull-House Museum presents Participatory Arts: Crafting Social Change, an exhibition exploring the settlement’s role as an early and influential site for the visual and performing arts in Chicago. The exhibition features artworks and artifacts from the museum and Special Collections at the University of Illinois at Chicago—many of which have rarely, if ever, been publicly displayed. Altogether, the exhibition reveals the significant impact of the historic Hull-House Settlement’s art programs—such as book-binding, ceramics, theater arts, and art therapy—on Chicago’s art and design legacy.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago. For more information, please visit:

https://www.artdesignchicago.org/events/participatory-arts-crafting-social-change

Exhibition: The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists

Coinciding with the 200th anniversary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819–1900), an important art critic of the Victorian era, the National Gallery has brought together over 90 works, including paintings, watercolors, and drawings, by American artists who were influenced by Ruskin’s writing. Specifically, the exhibition will explore Ruskin’s significant impact on artists associated with a movement called “American Pre-Raphaelitism,” which peaked between 1857 and 1867 and included American artists such as Thomas Charles Farrer (1839–1891), John William Hill (1812–1879), and Robert J. Pattison (1838–1903). The exhibition will showcase the group’s richly detailed figural compositions, landscapes, and still-life paintings.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2019/american-pre-raphaelites-radical-realists.html

Collection Loan: Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present and Future)

From the Terra Foundation Collection, Frederic Edwin Church’s, The Iceberg is exhibited in Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present and Future), organized by University of Colorado’s  CU Art Museum, Boulder, Colorado. This dialogue between American landscape painting and early scientific photography includes historical photographs from the archives of CU Boulder’s National Snow and Ice Data Center. Our Climate (Past, Present, Future) is the second exhibition in the 2018-19 series Documenting Change. The Iceberg will be exhibited  February 7–July 20, 2019.

For more information, please see:

https://www.colorado.edu/cuartmuseum/exhibitions/currently-view/documenting-change-our-climate-rockies

Frederic Edwin Church, The Iceberg, c. 1875, oil on canvas, 22 x 27 in. (55.9 x 68.6cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1993.6
Exhibition: Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan

Organized by the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum in partnership with the Yokohama Museum of Art, Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan focuses on the brief but intense friendship between Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) and Saburo Hasegawa (1906–1957), which was kindled during Noguchi’s visit to Japan in 1950. Both American-born Noguchi and Japanese-born Hasegawa had complex relationships with Japan and the US. Documenting the artists’ exploration of Japanese art, design, and culture, the exhibition will reveal how they interpreted and drew upon these references in their work.

This exhibition was previously at the Yokohama Art Museum.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.noguchi.org/programs/exhibitions/changing-and-unchanging-things-noguchi-and-hasegawa-postwar-japan

Conference: “Counterhistory: Latent and Underground Currents in American Art”

This conference spotlights the ways in which artists, critics, and historians have mobilized critical methods and methodologies against the rising tide of authoritarianism and illiberal populism. Featuring a wide range of projects—from the militant image to secret and clandestine works and networks—the one-day conference aims to articulate new forms in the writing and research in art history. The goal of the event is to rethink the notion of the underground as an evocative terrain for thought and struggle, in particular, the peculiar ways through which images and objects are historically obscured and silenced but emerge, unexpectedly, out of states of latency. The conference seeks to make sense of these forms of delay, resurrection, and survival.

This event is organized by Andrew Witt (2018–20 Terra Foundation Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) and Afonso Dias Ramos (Forum Transregionale Studien, Freie Universität Berlin).

For more information and to register, please visit: https://www.kunstgeschichte.hu-berlin.de/veranstaltungen/symposium-counterhistory-latent-and-underground-currents-in-american-art/