Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: Chicago Calling

The Collection de l’Art Brut in Lausanne presents Chicago Calling, an exhibition showcasing the work of 10 outsider artists—Henry Darger, William Dawson, Lee Godie, Mr. Imagination, Aldo Piacenza, Pauline Simon, Drossos Skyllas, Dr. Charles Smith, Wesley Willis, and Joseph Yoakum—who lived and worked in Chicago.

Overall, the exhibition highlights Chicago’s history of robust recognition and acceptance of self-taught art and artists by unearthing the common themes throughout the artists’ bodies of work in addition to the commingled histories of the curators, dealers, collectors, and appreciators who embraced outsider art genre in Chicago.

The exhibition is curated by Kenneth C. Burkhart (independent curator) and Lisa Stone (Curator of the Roger Brown Study Collection of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) and was originally presented at Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art from June 29, 2018–February 10, 2019. It traveled to Halle St. Pierre (Paris, France, March 23–August 2, 2019), Kunsthaus Kaufbeuren (Kaufbeuren, Germany, October 10, 2019–January 26, 2020), and will later be presented at the Outsider Art Museum (Amsterdam, October 7, 2020–May 24, 2021).

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago. For more information:

https://www.artbrut.ch/fr_CH/exposition/chicago-calling

Exhibition: Nam June Paik: The Future is Now

This exhibition presents the work of the American Korean artist Nam June Paik as a key figure of the 20th-century avant-garde movement. Paik’s experimentation with video, television technology, and large-scale installations not only situated him as a pioneer of interdisciplinary artistic practice, but also earned him the title of “the father of video art.” Born in South Korea in 1932, Paik moved first to Japan and eventually moved to Germany to study music. In Germany, he encountered musicians, composers, and experimental artists including John Cage, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Joseph Beuys, all of whom would become Paik’s life-long collaborators. In 1964, Paik immigrated to the United States where he became involved in the New York avant-garde and Fluxus, an informal international group of experimental artists. Over the next 30 years, Paik remained at the forefront of video and new media practice, collaborating with artistic and cultural figures such as Merce Cunningham, Laurie Anderson, and David Bowie, as well as engineers and broadcasters.

This exhibition was previously at Tate. It will also travel to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (November 2020–January 2021), SFMOMA (March 2021–July 2021), and the National Gallery Singapore (September 2021–January 2022).

For more information, please visit:

https://www.stedelijk.nl/en/exhibitions/nam-june-paik

Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

A major painting by Thomas Moran from the Terra Foundation for American Art Collection is on loan to the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology at the University of Oxford. Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon is exhibited in the permanent collection galleries devoted to British landscape painting of the 19th century. In the galleries, works by J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, and Samuel Palmer provide historical and artistic context for Moran’s painting, which was created just two years after the American artist’s visit to the UK.

This painting is on loan in conjunction with the Terra Foundation Visiting Professorships at the University of Oxford. This work will be on view from March 2019 through 2020.

For more information visit: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Thomas Moran, Autumn Afternoon, the Wissahickon, 1864, oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 45 1/4 in. (76.8 x 114.9 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.99
Terra Collection Initiative: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.
This installation is ongoing, January 2020 to December 2020.

For more information, please visit: http://www.artic.edu/

Max Weber, Construction, 1915, oil on canvas, 22 7/8 x 27 7/8 in. (58.1 x 70.8 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1987.31
Virtual Film Screening: The New Bauhaus

As the Nazis took over Germany, many displaced Bauhaus masters found refuge in the United States, including László Moholy-Nagy. In 1937, he established what many now consider America’s most influential mid-century school of design. The New Bauhaus is a documentary film exploring the artistic practice and legacy of László Moholy-Nagy, with particular focus on his time spent as founder and director of the New Bauhaus (later the School of Design and currently the IIT Institute of Design) in Chicago during the 1930s and 40s. Running 89 minutes in full, the documentary offers an illuminating portrait of a visionary teacher and thinker through archival footage plus interviews with his colleagues and contemporaneous practitioners and patrons of design, cultural historians and curators, and Moholy-Nagy’s daughter, Hattula.

In this virtual Q&A, Opendox brings together Director Alysa Nahmias, Executive Producer Marquise Stilwell of Opendox, and Curator of Photography at The Art Institute of Chicago Liz Siegel.

Join the virtual Q&A.

The New Bauhaus is available for streaming in Opendox’s Virtual Cinema Friday, June 12, through Thursday, June 18. To rent the film for viewing at home, visit The New Bauhaus website. The New Bauhaus is supported through Art Design Chicago, a Terra Foundation initiative.

 

Virtual Lecture Series: “Regarding the Portrait”

In this virtual lecture series, Amy M. Mooney, 2019–20 Terra Foundation Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford, examines the central role portraiture played in fostering social change in the United States from the 1890s to the 1950s. Drawing from her forthcoming book, Portraits of Noteworthy Character, Professor Mooney considers the strategic visual campaigns generated by individuals and social institutions that used the portrait to advance their progressive political ideologies. From the etiquette texts used at historically black colleges to the post cards produced by Hull House to the Harmon Foundation’s exhibition of “Portraits of Outstanding Americans of Negro Origin,” this series explores the ways in which the portrait was employed to build social relationships and negotiate modern subjectivity.

May 25
“The Primers”
For more information: https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/event/the-terra-lectures-in-american-art-regarding-the-portrait

June 1
“The Photographers”
For more information: https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/event/the-terra-lectures-in-american-art-regarding-the-portrait-0

June 8
“The Progressives”
For more information: https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/event/the-terra-lectures-in-american-art-regarding-the-portrait-1

June 15
“The Pragmatists”
For more information: https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/event/the-terra-lectures-in-american-art-regarding-the-portrait-the-pragmatics

Lectures will begin at 5:00 pm in Oxford (GMT +1) and be livestreamed on YouTube (links available above).

Exhibition: Peter Saul: Pop, Funk, Bad Painting and More

Consistently attentive to the chaos of the world, Peter Saul has engaged with some of the most sensitive issues of the 20th and 21st centuries. Covering his career since the late 1950s to the present day, the exhibition brings together more than 70 paintings, many previously unseen, as well as a collection of archival material. Despite the fact that Saul’s work reflects major movements of the 20th century, including Pop, Funk, and Bad Painting, the artist resists such categorizations of his work. Instead, Saul’s defiant style established a new form of historical painting that revolted against standards and served as a model for a generation of painters.

This exhibition was previously at les Abattoirs, Musée – Frac Occitanie Toulouse. For more information, please visit:

https://www.ledelta.be/evenements/visite-guidee-de-lexposition-peter-saul-pop-funk-bad-and-more/

Exhibition: Signs and Wonders: The Photographs of John Beasley Greene

Over the course of his brief career, John Beasley Greene produced a body of pictures that advanced both archaeology and photography and that continues to offer insight into the central concerns that shaped the two fields. This exhibition, the first retrospective of this photographer, contextualizes Greene’s career through new scholarship, nearly 70 rare prints and albums, and Egyptian artwork from the Art Institute’s collection. This exhibition considers the complex aesthetic and political lenses that we use to look at photography and the past, as well as the complicated relationship between photography, colonialism, and modernism.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/9167/signs-and-wonders-the-photographs-of-john-beasley-greene

Digital Symposium: “‘Nature’ in American Art since 1970”

This digital symposium, organized by Joshua Shannon, 2019–20 Terra Foundation Visiting Professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, will consider if the art produced in the United States over the last fifty years can help us model a new human-nonhuman relationship for the era of climate change. Has recent American art, to be slightly more specific, imagined any viable alternative to the modern idea of nature as the passive “other” to human agency, an object or image to be exploited or protected by “man”? What role might art play in the cultural transformation that will be necessary for stopping climate change? This symposium brings together a small group of leading scholars and invites them each, through close analysis of works of art, to propose answers to these questions.

For more information, including the program, please visit the university’s event page.

The symposium recording is available online. 

Exhibition: Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945

Mexico underwent a radical cultural transformation at the end of its Revolution in 1920. A new relationship between art and the public was established, giving rise to art that spoke directly to the people about social justice and national life. The model galvanized artists in the United States who were seeking to break free of European aesthetic domination to create publicly significant and accessible art. Numerous American artists traveled to Mexico, and the leading Mexican muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—spent extended periods of time in the United States, executing murals, paintings, and prints; exhibiting their work; and interacting with local artists.

With approximately 200 works by sixty Mexican and American artists, this exhibition demonstrates the impact Mexican artists had on their counterparts in the United States during this period and the ways in which their example inspired American artists both to create epic narratives about American history and everyday life, and to use their art to protest economic, social, and racial injustices.

For more information, please visit:

https://whitney.org/exhibitions/vida-americana