Terra Foundation-supported Events

Exhibition: The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766–1820

This exhibition reunites an extraordinary collection of paintings, portraits, and prints; mineral, plant, and animal specimens; scientific instruments; American Indian artifacts; and relics from the ancient world. Originally assembled in the Philosophy Chamber, an ornately decorated room devoted to the discipline of natural philosophy, this early teaching collection at Harvard College was founded in 1766. Artists, scientists, students, and advocates of American Independence—John Singleton Copley, John Trumbull, George Washington, John Adams, and James Monroe, among others—came to the Philosophy Chamber to discover and disseminate new knowledge. The collection and the chamber played a vital role in teaching and research at Harvard, while also serving as the center of artistic and intellectual life in the greater New England region for more than 50 years.

The exhibition was also on view at Harvard Art Museums (May 15, 2017).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.gla.ac.uk/hunterian/visit/exhibitions/exhibitionprogramme/thephilosophychamber/

Exhibition: Robert Smithson: Time Crystals

Robert Smithson: Time Crystals is the first exhibition in Australia dedicated to the artist. Best known for his radical land art of the 1960s and early 1970s, Smithson is now widely recognized as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Inspired by ideas of crystalline geometry and non-biological time, he redefined abstraction and challenged art history.

Featuring new research on the artist’s practice, Time Crystals presents sculpture, photography, film, drawings, and texts borrowed from major Australian and international collections. It also includes the most extensive display of Smithson’s manuscript and archival material to date drawn from the Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt Papers at the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art.

This exhibition will also be on view at the Monash University Museum of Art (July 21–September 22, 2018).

For more information, please visit:
https://www.artmuseum.uq.edu.au/

Robert Smithson during the building of Spiral Jetty 1970
Rozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah, 1 April 1970
Photograph: Gianfranco Gorgoni
Reproduced coutesy of Gianfranco Gorgoni
Exhibition: Irving Penn: Centennial

This major retrospective of the photographs of Irving Penn commemorates the centennial of the artist’s birth, and will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the artist to date. Over the course of his nearly 70-year career, Penn mastered a pared-down aesthetic of studio photography that is distinguished for its meticulous attention to composition, nuance, and detail.

This exhibition was also on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (April 24–July 30, 2017) and the Grand Palais, Paris, France (September 21, 2017–January 29, 2018). It will subsequently travel to Sao Paulo, Brazil.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.co-berlin.org/en/irving-penn

Study Day: “Video Art and the Public Sphere in the US: 1965–1980”

This conversational study session will examine video art as a young medium and its relationship to the public, broadly speaking, during the contentious late 1960s and 1970s when visions of American democracy were changing. We are interested in video’s activist identity and its contributions to cultures of protest, its relationship to the “establishment,” modes of dissemination, collaborative making practices, portability, and its insertion into transnational dialogues.

LUX is an international arts agency that supports and promotes artists’ moving image practices and the ideas that surround them. The only organization of its kind in the UK, LUX represents the country’s only significant collection of artists’ film and video, and is the largest distributor of such work in Europe.

This event is by invitation only.

Symposium: “Empathy, Intimacy, and Ethics in American Art”

Do we feel ourselves by looking at objects? This two-day international symposium in Berlin returns to the late nineteenth-century German proposal that empathy (die Einfühlung) constitutes a way to understand aesthetic response. In contemporary usage, empathy implies the ability to share another person’s feelings, offering the possibility of transcending social divisions through emotion. However, the word’s complex life begins in an aesthetic theory of how human emotions project into optical forms.

Who feels themselves in which objects? Considering the relationships of visual perception, bodily touch, and emotional response, symposium speakers will offer new narratives and counter-narratives of empathy and intimacy that foreground the differences of power, race, ethnicity, and gender that mark the complex history of American art. Talks will range across art forms, styles, and periods, including nineteenth-century performances and neo-classical sculpture, early twentieth-century urban photography and Communist dance, post-war abstract sculpture by veterans in France, contemporary memorials to victims of police brutality, and social practice projects with refugees. We will consider empathy as a notion for opening connections, as well as highlighting the disconnections, among separated academic disciplines and national aesthetic histories.

Speakers:

  • Larne Abse Gogarty
  • Saidiya Hartman
  • Caroline A. Jones
  • Lauren Kroiz
  • Katharina Oguntoye
  • Hortense Spillers
  • Leigh Raiford
  • Heike Raphael-Hernandez

For more information, please visit:
http://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/en/faculty/culture/dates/Terra-Conference.html

Conference: “Art, Life & Politics: American Printmaking from the 1960s to Today”

Printmaking concerns social attitudes, you know—politics and a public.”
Franz Kline, Artnews, January 1972, p. 29.

This international conference will look at the ways printmaking engaged with and often challenged American society and politics from the 1960s to today. Special attention will be given to print workshops, collaborative practices, and the ways in which the print media encouraged art activism. Focusing on the specificity of materiality and creative process, the conference seeks to examine how the various layers of these works could be socially and/or politically encoded. Among the questions speakers will address: How was the meaning of artistic authorship redefined through printmaking? Who were the audiences? How did artists use original multiples at a time when the personal and the political became increasingly intertwined?

“Art, Life & Politics” is held in conjunction with the exhibition The American Dream: Pop to the Present. Prints from the British Museum, a collaboration between the Fondation Custodia, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and the British Museum.

Speakers:

  • Stephen Coppel (Curator, Modern Prints and Drawings, British Museum)
  • Jacqueline Francis (Associate Professor, Visual and Critical Studies Department, California College of the Arts)
  • Elisabeth Lebovici (Independent Scholar)
  • Laurence Schmidlin (Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne)
  • Richard Shiff (Professor, Art History, The University of Texas at Austin)
  • Susan Tallman (Adjunct Associate Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago & Editor-in-Chief, Art in Print)
  • Hervé Vanel (Assistant Professor, Art History, The American University of Paris)

On this occasion, a conversation between artist Jim Dine and Ruth Fine (Independent Curator & Curator Emeritus, Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art) will also take place. This event is by separate invitation only.

For more information and to consult the full conference program, please click here.

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1961-75. Gravure sur bois sur papier crème oriental, 378 x 513 mm/628 x 860 mm (feuille). British Museum, Londres 2010,7103.1 Acquis avec le soutien financier du Fonds de Bienfaisance James A. et Laura M. Duncan aux American Friends du British Museum © Trustees of the British Museum et © Judd Foundation/Adagp, Paris, 2018
Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Max Weber, Construction, 1915, oil on canvas, 22 7/8 x 27 7/8 in. (58.1 x 70.8 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1987.31
Exhibition: Jasper Johns: “Something Resembling Truth”

The first comprehensive survey of Jasper Johns’s work to be held in the United Kingdom in 40 years, this exhibition will feature more than 150 paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints, revealing the continuities and changes that have occurred in the artist’s career over the past six decades and the curiosity and experimentation that Johns continues to apply to his current practice.

This exhibition was also on view at the Royal Academy of Arts in London (September 23 – December 10, 2017).

For more information please visit:
https://www.thebroad.org/art/special-exhibitions/jasper-johns-something-resembling-truth

 

Collection Loan: Gallery Installation

Since April 2005, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). Works from the collection of the Terra Foundation and works from the Art Institute of Chicago are located together in a suite of galleries, together providing one of the nation’s most comprehensive presentations of American art.

This installation is ongoing, January 2018 to December 2018.

For more information, please visit http://www.artic.edu/collections/art-institute-chicago-and-terra-foundation-american-art.

Max Weber, Construction, 1915, oil on canvas, 22 7/8 x 27 7/8 in. (58.1 x 70.8 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1987.31
Seminar: “Moholy-Nagy and the Materiality of Industry” by Robin Schuldenfrei

When the newly emigrated László Moholy-Nagy encountered Chicago’s exhilarating built environment and its exceptional space of commerce—with its framework for the production, distribution, and movement of vast quantities of goods—he had already been evoking, from his earliest days in 1920s Berlin, the rationalization of industry for art. In Chicago, Moholy re-instigated the primacy of the 3D object in his practice. This lecture by Robin Schuldenfrei of the Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to understand Moholy’s engagement with Chicago, and the US, by tracing a long arc across Moholy’s investigations in ephemeral surface effects and the materiality of industry.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/05242018-robin-schuldenfrei-courtauld-institute-art