Terra Foundation-supported Events

Seminar: “A Threat to Human Scale: The Eames Office’s Tandem Seating System for Chicago’s O’Hare Airport (1962)” by Michael Golec

Michael Golec, Associate Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will discuss how Charles Eames incorporated the notion of “human scale” into his design approach for Chicago’s O’Hare Airport in the early 1960s.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/09062018-michael-golec-school-art-institute-chicago

Exhibition: 3–D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980

3-D Doings: The Imagist Object in Chicago Art, 1964–1980 examines the little-known sculptural work and dimensional painting made by the Chicago Imagists during the early years of their practice. As the first in-depth exploration of the overall affinity of Imagist artists for objects, the exhibition features artists who worked individually to craft unique approaches, but who shared key influences, such as Surrealism and the Surrealist objects. In addition to members of the original Imagist groups, the exhibition includes work by Don Baum, the chief curator of the Imagist moment; Ray Yoshida, the teacher with whom many Imagists studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; as well as H.C. Westermann, arguably the point of origin for the exhibition.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://tang.skidmore.edu/exhibitions/238-3-d-doings-the-imagist-object-in-chicago-art-1964-1980

Exhibition: South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980

During the 1960s and 1970s, Chicago was shaped by art and ideas produced and circulated on the South Side. Yet the history of the period’s creative and social ferment has often remained segregated by the city’s social, political, and geographic divides. South Side Stories: Rethinking Chicago Art, 1960–1980—organized by the Smart Museum in collaboration with the DuSable Museum of African American History and presented concurrently with South Side Stories: Holdings at the DuSable—takes a nuanced look at the cultural history of Chicago’s South Side during this momentous era of change and conflict, with a focus on artists of the Black Arts Movement. Through nearly 100 objects, the show upends dominant narratives of the period and unearths rich stories by examining watershed cultural moments from the Hairy Who to the Wall of Respect, from the Civil Rights movement to the AfriCOBRA, from vivid protest posters to visionary outsider art, and from the Free University movement to the radical jazz of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/south-side-stories-rethinking-chicago-art/

Exhibition: Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago

Designers in Film: Avant-Garde and Commercial Cinema in Mid-Century Chicago examines and illuminates the distinctive vein of industrial films which Chicago became known for in the 1950s and 1960s, and their compelling relationship to more avant-garde film experiments produced by the same artists and designers, including, most prominently, Morton and Millie Goldsholl and their firm Goldsholl and Associates. The Goldsholls were part of a generation of designers that emerged from the Institute of Design, where László Moholy-Nagy famously fostered a curriculum of aesthetic experimentation and social engagement. The Goldsholls’ innovative integration of film with other forms of visual production such as print advertising and brand development placed them at the forefront of their peers in design, and the wider community of filmmakers in Chicago. Designers in Film is the first exhibition to focus on the relationship between film and mid-twentieth century art and design in Chicago, and to study this history as a particular outgrowth of the city’s social, artistic, and political climate. The exhibition features highly inventive moving images alongside materials related to their creation, ranging from designed objects to drawings, print advertisements, photographs, and other ephemera.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/view/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/designers-in-film.html

Seminar: “The Open Plan Office in the Windy City” by Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler

In the late 1960s, the open plan office concept challenged conventional office planning by radically reimagining the office as a space that could reduce hierarchy, increase communication, and support organizational change. Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler, Assistant Professor of Design History at Purdue University, will argue that the city of Chicago was a vital nexus of activity in the earliest promotion and experimentation of the open plan office concept.

This interdisciplinary scholarly seminar is part of the on-going academic program Chicago: City of Design and Commerce, 1890–1990, which will run from fall 2017 through fall 2018. This series offers a forum for scholars to gather, share works-in-progress, and discuss new scholarship that explores Chicago’s contributions to design history. The series is presented by the Newberry Library’s Center for American History and Culture as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information and to RSVP, please visit: https://www.newberry.org/10182018-jennifer-kaufmann-buhler-purdue-university

Exhibition: Chicago New Media 1973–1992

Chicago New Media 1973–1992 seeks to illuminate the largely untold story of Chicago’s role in the history of new media. Consisting of an exhibition, public program, and scholarly catalog, the project yields a new art historical understanding of the artists and organizations that contributed to digital art and technology in the latter half of the 20th century.

This exhibition is presented as part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

For more information, please visit: https://www.videogameartgallery.com/events/2018/11/1/chicago-new-media-19731992

Exhibition/Terra Collection Initiative: Daniel J. Terra Gallery Installation

Since 2014, the Terra Foundation of American Art has loaned works for display to Musée des Impressionnismes Giverny.  Works form the Terra Foundation Collection are on display in a gallery dedicated to Daniel J. Terra. The gallery places a focus on the rich impressionist legacy of Giverny and its surrounds.  This installation features five works from the Terra Foundation Collection:

This installation is on view March 25th to November 6th, 2016; March 24th to November 2017; and March to November 2019.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mdig.fr/en

John Leslie Breck, Morning and Fog, 1892, oil on canvas, 32 x 46 3/16 in. (81.3 x 117.3 cm), Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.19