Asia


The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo
$100,000
Tokyo, Japan
2018

To support A Retrospective of Gordon Matta-Clark, the first Asian retrospective of Gordon Matta-Clark, an American conceptual artist who opened new horizons in sculpture and photography. The exhibition re-evaluates the artist’s pioneering examples of site-specific and installation works from a contemporary standpoint. A catalogue will be published by the museum in both Japanese and English.

National Gallery Singapore
$200,000
Singapore
2018

To support Minimalism: Space, Light, Object, an exhibition that aims to introduce local audiences to Minimalism, an influential postwar movement most strongly associated with the US, and to consider the international practice and manifestations that continue to shape contemporary art and culture today. A catalogue will be published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Doshisha University
$474,630
Kyoto, Japan
2017

To establish a visiting professorship in Japan to be shared by Doshisha University and Kobe University. Throughout this program, three American art historians will reside in Kyoto for one year each, offering four courses annually in American art history before 1980.

Pathways to Modernism: American Art, 1865-1945
$24,510
Shanghai, China
2016

To support the development of Pathways to Modernism: American Art, 1865–1945 in collaboration with the Art Institute of Chicago and the Shanghai Museum. The exhibition is currently proposed to be shown at the Shanghai Museum in fall 2018.

NHK Promotions, Inc.
$300,000
Tokyo, Japan
2016

To support Mary Cassatt Retrospective, an exhibition held at the Yokohama Museum of Art and the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto. The accompanying English- and Japanese-language catalogue is published by NHK Promotions, Inc. (Tokyo).

Bunkamura Museum of Art
$150,000
Tokyo, Japan
2009

To support the catalogue and 2010–2011 exhibition Monet and the American Painters of Giverny, co-organized by the Bunkamura Museum of Art and the Terra Foundation for American Art, and traveling to three venues in Japan. The exhibition introduces Japanese audiences to numerous American artists who lived and worked in the Normandy village of Giverny, where Claude Monet made his home.

Kobe University
$20,200
Kobe, Japan
2013

To support “Multi-Locale Pops in the 1960s,” a symposium that brings together seven prominent postwar art specialists to promote scholarship of American art from a global perspective through discussion of the international development of Pop Art in Latin America, Asia, New York, and California.

NHK Promotions Inc.
$250,000
Tokyo, Japan
2013

To support a retrospective of the work of James McNeill Whistler, which visits the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, and the Yokohama Museum of Art. The first of its kind since 1987, this exhibition introduces the artist’s work to the Japanese public, paying special attention to the influence of Japanese art on the development of his style. A catalogue accompanies the project.

Hara Museum of Contemporary Art
$90,000
Tokyo, Japan
2014

To support the exhibition Cy Twombly—Fifty Years of Works on Paper, which is the first exhibition of Twombly’s work to be held in Japan. The exhibition takes place at the Hara Museum of Contemporary At, Tokyo, and the Hara Museum ARC, Gunma, and is accompanied by educational programing and a small introductory catalogue in both Japanese and English.

Los Angeles County Museum/National Museum of Korea/Art Gallery of New South Wales
$849,968
Los Angeles, California/Seoul, South Korea/Sydney, Australia
2012

To support the 2013–14 exhibition, Art Across America, at the National Museum of Korea, Daejeon Museum of Art, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales (under the title America: Painting a Nation). Co-organized by Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the National Museum of Korea, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Terra Foundation for American Art, the exhibition is the first major survey of historical American art mounted in Korea and Australia and features more than 100 American paintings and six vignettes of decorative arts and design drawn from the collections of the U.S. partners. In addition to the support provided to the co-organizers, the National Museum of Korea and the Art Gallery of New South Wales received funding for a series of public lectures, education programs, and a major publication featuring texts in Korean and English.