North America


Chicago Public Art Group
$50,000
Chicago, IL
2024

The Chicago Public Art Group (CPAG) seeks support to preserve one of the earliest CPAG murals still extant and one of the few monumental murals created for a labor union, the Union Electrical Workers Mural (1973–74), also known as “Solidarity,” by CPAG cofounder John Pitman Weber and the late Jose Guerrero. Addressing such themes as resilience and the dignity of labor, and representing the story of the UE, industrial unionism, and related social movements, “Solidarity” reflects Chicago’s centrality to the revival of the mural movement of the 1960s and 70s and is significant to the city’s art history and US labor history. The sale of the United Electrical Workers (UE) Hall at 37 S. Ashland Avenue necessitates moving the mural to preserve and conserve it—work to be carried out by Parma Conservation, after which it will be rehoused at the Chicago’s Teachers Union at 1901 West Carroll Street. 

Norman Rockwell Museum
$50,000
Stockbridge, Massachusetts
2024

To support the reinterpretation of Norman Rockwell’s The Problem We All Live With. The painting has become one of the most recognized and potent images of the modern civil rights movement, and the Norman Rockwell Museum seeks to develop a new interpretive framework that tells a more complete story of the painting. The project contextualizes the work more deeply within the desegregation of schools in New Orleans and the specific people involved, as well as within the work Rockwell did before and after this painting. The project also addresses the ways that Rockwell’s art can be presented today in an inclusive and meaningful way for diverse audiences.    

Park Avenue Armory
$25,000
New York, New York
2024

Park Avenue Armory is seeking support for The Radical Practice of Black Curation: A Symposium and Retreat, jointly proposed by Tavia Nyong’o (Yale University) and Tina M. Campt (Princeton University) as part of Nyong’o’s curated series of public programs titled “Making Space at the Armory.” Starting from the observation that the past two decades have witnessed the success of a wide range of Black artists, this symposium considers the conditions that have enabled this success, in particular the ascent of a visionary group of Black curators and curators of color, who have expanded the capacity of arts institutions to recognize the work of an increasingly diverse group of artists. 

National Association for Latino Arts and Cultures— NALAC
$25,000
San Antonio, Texas
2024

The National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC) is a professional organization that serves the US Latino arts and cultural sector via funding, leadership training, convenings, research, and advocacy. The grant supports NALAC’s first regional workshop in Chicago, an event tailored to the needs and interests of area artists/administrators across disciplines but also designed to promote national connections. Workshop plans and content are informed by a local advisory committee and findings from a survey of Latinx/e arts workers to understand how the convening can add value to the Chicago area, as well as grasp what skills and information are needed and who are the potential speakers from whom respondents want to learn. 

Grantmakers in the Arts
$25,000
Bronx, New York
2024

Grantmakers in the Arts (GIA), a national professional organization that provides professional development and resources for arts grantmakers, is holding its annual conference in Chicago in October 2024. This grant offsets speaker fees. Shaped by a local committee, the conference comprises four days of sessions as well as cultural programs and tours at cultural sites identified by the committee. The critical goals of the conference are to advance racial equity in arts funding, connect funders to the larger national arts grantmaking ecosystem, and introduce funders from around the nation to local creative communities. 

College Art Association
$25,000
New York, New York
2024

CAA promotes the visual arts and their understanding through advocacy, intellectual engagement, and a commitment to the diversity of practices and practitioners. As the largest professional convening of artists, art historians, students, designers, curators, and visual art professionals in the United States for over a century, the CAA Annual Conference is a unique space for dialogue, engagement, and professional development in the field of American art.  

Enrich Chicago
$55,000
Chicago, IL
2024

The service organization Enrich Chicago works to dismantle racist systems in the arts through its professional development programs and research for the local arts sectorThe foundation’s grant supports Enrich’s current research project, “Portrait of Inequity 2.0,” which is assessing progress toward racial equity in Chicago’s arts ecosystem over the last five years and identifying accountability standards for use by the arts sector. Additionally, the grant helps to support Enrich’s operating expenses over two years. 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
$20,000
Champaign, IL
2024

The publication Supergraphic Landscapes (Applied Research and Design Publishing) is a collaboration between architect Joseph Altshuler and graphic designer Nekita Thomas, both public art practitioners and faculty at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, featuring contributions from other designers as well. The book traces the lineages of creative placemaking and chronicles contemporary public art practices and strategies that blend graphic design, architecture, and landscape architecture primarily in Chicago’s South and West Sides, analyzing public art’s role in fostering identity, access, and a sense of belonging. Through case studies and analysis, the authors aim to develop a resource for the arts and design fields, showing how disciplinespanning public art practices can help reimagine public spaces and a more liberatory city. 

Urban Gateways
$25,000
Chicago, IL
2024

The youth-led webzine MILDSAUCE: The Art and Fashion Issue explores the question, “How Does Art Influence Fashion and Vice Versa?” and considers the impact of art and fashion on Chicago artists Nick Cave and the late Virgil Abloh. The young journalists use various media and processes (interviews, writing, video, and podcasting) to tell stories intended to delve deeply into the relationships between contemporary art and fashion in Chicago.  

Sixty Inches From Center
$25,000
Chicago, IL
2024

Sixty Inches From Center, in partnership with the Chicago Park District’s Arts & Culture Unit (ACU), produces a multiauthor publication, Finding Ceremony, with art publisher For The Birds Trapped In Airports and editor Kamilah Rashied. The book chronicles ACU’s inaugural Anchor Curatorial Residency, awarded to Tiffany M. Johnson. Johnson’s residency and exhibition project at the Park District’s Austin Town Hall Cultural Center examined the tensions between safety, care, and the visibility of Black and Brown lives in the municipal space. The book offers a model of community-centered curation, showing how municipalities can leverage their structural, human, and natural resources to empower cultural workers and artists as interlocutors in collaboration with communities.   

National Public Housing Museum
$25,000
Chicago, IL
2024

The Making of the National Public Housing Museum is a multiauthor publication that documents the process of developing a museum centered on the voices and experiences of some of our nation’s most marginalized communities. Featuring essays and interviews, the book details how public housing residents inform the contents of the museum and the ways their stories are shared. Additionally, the book provides a visual narrative for exhibition strategies that embrace art and design and their role in shaping perceptions, knowledge, and emotion around such issues as race, class, gender, and other themes central to our common future, and that serve as a call to our nation. 

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
$35,000
Chicago, IL
2024

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago is launching a seven-day workshop for college and university faculty and instructors, “Chicago Designs: New Approaches to Teaching Social History and Design,” which introduces participants to design-related archives and collections across Chicago. The project brings a critical eye to established design histories and reveals hidden narratives of labor and disability as well as other histories. Participants develop and share teaching resources (syllabi, teaching plans, assignment templates, bibliographies, etc.) based on collection materials, which are gathered on a public website in partnership with area archives and other collecting organizations.