All Grants


Museu de Arte de São Paulo
$75,000
São Paulo, Brazil
2019

To support Picture Gallery in Transformation: MCA Chicago at MASP, which is part of a series to bring works of art by non-Brazilian artists from the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s collection to MASP for integration into the exhibition displays of MASP’s own collection.

Richard H. Driehaus Museum
$100,000
Chicago, Illinois
2019

To support Eternal Light: The Sacred Stained-Glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany, an exhibition that examines ecclesiastical windows created by Louis Comfort Tiffany and his workshops between 1880 and 1920. Commissioned by churches across the United States, these works—varying from intimate portraits to monumental triptychs—feature imagery drawn from the Christian religious tradition, illustrated in the figurative style contemporary to the time. A catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

Smithsonian American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery
$200,000
Washington, DC
2019

To support Alexander von Humboldt and the United States: Art, Nature, and Culture, which positions Prussian naturalist’s Alexander von Humboldt’s ties to the United States as a crucial factor in the construction of American cultural identity and visual arts. The exhibition examines Humboldt’s century-long influence on five spheres of American cultural development: visual arts, sciences, literature, politics, and exploration. A catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

Tate Modern
$475,000
London, United Kingdom
2019

To support Nam June Paik: The Future is Now at all five venues: Tate Modern, Stedelijk Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and National Gallery Singapore. The exhibition is the first of its scale to present the Korean American artist Nam June Paik as a key figure of the twentieth-century avant-garde movement. English- and Dutch-language catalogues accompany the exhibition.

Whitney Museum of American Art
$250,000
New York, New York
2019

To support The Impact of the Mexican Muralists on Artists in the United States, 1920-1950, which focuses on the impact of the “Mexican Vogue” on American art made between 1920 and
1950, a period defined by frequent travel of Mexican and American artists and intellectuals between the two countries. The exhibition brings together approximately 180 works by some 65 different artists from the United States and Mexico. A catalogue accompanies the exhibition, which will also be presented at the McNay Art Museum and the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Yorkshire Sculpture Park
$200,000
Wakefield, United Kingdom
2019

To support David Smith in Yorkshire, the largest exhibition on David Smith to take place in the United Kingdom outside of London. Smith was a key figure in the history of twentieth-century sculpture, and the exhibition includes approximately 40 sculptures, drawn from four decades, beginning with Smith’s earliest experimental works from the 1930s and ending with his large-scale sculptures of the 1960s, along with a selection of drawings. A catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts de Paris- Cergy and the École Supérieure d’Art et de Design TALM-Angers, Art by Translation
$17,640
Angers, France
2019

To support “Mel Bochner on Translation,” a one-day symposium exploring the career and legacy of artist Mel Bochner, paying particular attention to how his work engages with linguistic and translation theories and highlighting the relationship between Bochner’s work and the theories of Jean-Paul Sartre, Jacques Derrida, Roland Barthes, Martin Heidegger, and Walter Benjamin.

Asian/Pacific/American Institute, New York University
$25,000
New York, New York
2019

To support “Activism and Diaspora: American Art Histories,” a program that brings together scholars from the overlapping fields of diasporic art and American art for a two-day workshop. The program expands the conception of American art to include activist art. It explores activist art produced by Asian American, Latinx, African American, Asian, and Indigenous artists, and also considers the ways in which art by some Asian American artists addresses domestic and global concerns.

Center for Italian Modern Art
$12,500
New York, New York
2019

To support “Methodologies of Exchange: MoMA’s Twentieth-Century Italian Art Exhibition (1949),” a program that examines the Museum of Modern Art’s 1949 exhibition Twentieth-Century Italian Art and how this shaped American artists’ views of Italian modernism. To study those involved in the MoMA show and those directly affected by its consequences, the program is divided into two main sections: the first half looking at the reception of Italian art and artists in the United States, and the second half focused on American artists.

Chicano Studies Research Center, University of California Los Angeles
$25,000
Los Angeles, California
2019

To support “Art in the Global 18th–20th Centuries at California’s Missions: Expanding ‘American’ Art to Incorporate the Legacy of Conquest,” a two-and-a-half-day program that expands the view of American art to account for the art collections at California’s missions and the effects of conquest on Indigenous makers.