A picture of three people looking at a breechcloth on a table.

Big Soldier family (Iowa Tribe) reunited with their grandfather’s breechcloth at First Americans Museum, 2023 [NMAI 027462.000]. Photo by James Pepper Henry.

Supported Projects

The Terra Foundation for American Art awarded 94 grants in October 2023, totaling about $9.7 million in support of projects that broaden the understandings of American art. Grants awarded in October include support for strategic initiatives, exhibitions, convenings, and Art Design Chicago.

Supported projects include the Alfredo F. Tadiar Library’s convening “Networks of Survival, Ecologies of Flourishing,” the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s exhibition A Bold and Beautiful Vision: A Century of Black Arts Education in Washington, D.C., 1900–2000, Moderna Museet Stockholm’s exhibition Vaginal Davis: Magnificent Product, and First Americans Museum’s project WINIKO: REUNIONS.

Alfredo F. Tadiar Library’s “Networks of Survival, Ecologies of Flourishing” is a weeklong convening for artists and scholars from different Philippine and Filipinx diasporic contexts. The artists and academics workshop creative projects that explore themes of social survival and ecological sustainability in a region marked by US foreign policy and colonial rule. Organized by Neferti Tadiar (Barnard College) and Lucy Burns (Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department, UCLA) in San Fernando, La Union, Philippines, the project fosters the nurturing of regional cultural and intellectual capacities outside of Metro Manila. The convening, to be held in January 2024, includes a livestreamed public presentation, a gathering with local community organizations, and planning sessions for an upcoming exhibition scheduled for the end of 2024.

“Networks of Survival, Ecologies of Flourishing gathers artists and researchers to workshop critical and creative projects in progress relating to themes of creative social survival and ecological sustainability in a time of global and planetary crisis,” said Dr. Neferti Tadiar, Director of the Tadiar Library. “This collaborative workshop aims to support and develop artistic and critical works seeking decolonial environmental and socioeconomic justice possibilities across different Philippine and Filipinx diasporic contexts through a transformative praxis of mutual care and equitable, life-enabling sociality. Informed by feminist and queer praxis of generating and honing knowledge in/and community, the Institute will foster peer-to-peer engagement, collaboration, dialogue, and inquiry as effective ways to address our present social, economic, and environmental crises and craft alternative futures of flourishing for all. By forging transnational connections between Filipinx and Philippine artists and local environmental advocacies, it will strengthen the Alfredo F. Tadiar Library’s emerging role as a progressive force for shaping new cultural ecologies.”

“By forging transnational connections between Filipinx and Philippine artists and local environmental advocacies, [the convening] will strengthen the Alfredo F. Tadiar Library’s emerging role as a progressive force for shaping new cultural ecologies.”

Dr. Neferti Tadiar, Director of the Tadiar Library

The Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum’s A Bold and Beautiful Vision: A Century of Black Arts Education in Washington, D.C., 1900–2000 illuminates the rich tradition of African American artist-educators in the nation’s capital. These scholars overcame an underfunded, overcrowded, and segregated school system en route to inspiring generations of artists and cultivating the early careers of Elizabeth Catlett, James A. Porter, Alma Thomas, Madame Lillian Evanti, and Hilda Wilkinson Brown. Among innumerable others, these artists went on to become artist-educators themselves. The exhibition highlights how they built and sustained arts programs that enriched the city’s young people, and how this history calls attention to the need for a renewed commitment to the arts in local schools today.

Students at their desks in a classroom looking towards the front of the room.

Lois Mailou Jones’ art class at Howard University, c. 1930s

“For more than fifty years, the Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum has been a dedicated supporter of local African American artists and arts educators, so we are truly excited to be mounting A Bold and Beautiful Vision, which recasts Washington, D.C., as a major center for Black arts education across the twentieth century,” said Katelynd Anderson, Director of Communications and Advancement at the Smithsonian Anacostia Musuem. “The exhibition celebrates the rich but overlooked history of African American artists who taught or were educated in the nation’s capital, often in the face of the seemingly insurmountable odds of a segregated and underfunded school system—Elizabeth Catlett, Alma Thomas, James A. Porter, Loïs Mailou Jones, David Driskell, Hilda Wilkinson Brown, Sam Gilliam, and Georgette Seabrooke Powell, to name only a few. We look forward to welcoming our local communities to see the artwork and hear the voices of these African American artist-educators who enriched the lives of many generations of Washington’s young people and produced work admired by audiences across the globe.”

Moderna Museet Stockholm’s Vaginal Davis: Magnificent Product is the first survey exhibition of American artist, filmmaker, performer, and writer Vaginal Davis. The exhibition, developed in close dialogue with the artist, is guided by her approach to queerness as a form that holds no center but emerges from a connected community of people and spaces. It will be distributed across seven institutions in Stockholm, with each partner hosting a presentation that represents a different part of Davis’s practice and that is aligned with that institution’s expertise and interests.

“As a leading lady in punk, queer, and Black (art) histories in the United States and beyond, Vaginal Davis has made scenes for a living—from her hometown Los Angeles to her adopted home of Berlin,” said Hendrik Folkerts, Curator of International Contemporary Art and Head of Exhibitions at Moderna Museet Stockholm. “The exhibition shows her practice in painting, film, and writing, and how this intersects with her lives as a musician, performer, and organizer. Following Davis’s approach to art as a practice that holds no center but emerges from a connected community of people and spaces, as well as a plurality of forms and media, the exhibition adopts a unique curatorial model and will unfold as a multi-nodal exhibition across Moderna Museet and various institutions in Stockholm, including the National museum, Accelerator, Index–The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation, Tensta Konsthall, and MDT. The collaborative impulse behind this project is informed by both an insistence on the multiplicity of Davis’s practice and a desire to host communities in different ways and in different spaces—indeed, to envision the exhibition as a heterogeneous platform where an audience can become a community across various spaces in a city.”

A picture of a person in a white dress waving, standing in front of a black car, on a sidewalk.

Vaginal Davis, Photo: Frank Rodriguez

The exhibition installation at Moderna Museet Stockholm consists of an archeology of practice across three major galleries. In the first, a visual album will be presented, composed from and attuned to Davis’s work in punk music, club organizing, and filmmaking from the late 1970s up through the early 2000s. In the second space, Davis returns to her apartment gallery in Los Angeles, “HAG—small, contemporary, haggard” (1982–1987), in an installation that merges archival material with music and paintings. Davis’s “The Wicked Pavilion” will anchor the third gallery: a room-sized installation that fashions an intimate domestic setting as a queer public space, featuring work from the early 2000s until the present day.

A picture of three people looking at a breechcloth on a table.

Big Soldier family (Iowa Tribe) reunited with their grandfather’s breechcloth at First Americans Museum, 2023 [NMAI 027462.000]. Photo by James Pepper Henry.

First Americans Museum’s (FAM) research and documentary project WINIKO: Reunions (January 2023–December 2024) will inform and live on beyond the run of WINIKO: Life of an Object, an exhibition set to open in spring 2025. Reunions takes items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian to First Americans Museum and presents them to their makers’ relatives within tribal nations located in Oklahoma so that they can engage with these objects. Through consultation and cooperation with tribal nations and descendant families, FAM is creating object-family reunions that provide deeper knowledge about the objects within the national collection, challenging the idea that institutionally collected objects no longer have familial ties to cultural communities. Once completed, the results and stories will be published as a catalogue and will provide content for a feature-length film, and will also be reported back to tribal nations.

“First Americans Museum’s WINIKO: Reunions project challenges the idea that institutionally collected objects no longer have familial ties to cultural communities. We believe that reuniting cultural materials with their relative families is a benefit to the tribal nations and the collecting institutions, producing new knowledge and art that benefits museum audiences.”

heather ahtone, Director of Cultural Affairs at First Americans Museum

“First Americans Museum’s WINIKO: Reunions project challenges the idea that institutionally collected objects no longer have familial ties to cultural communities,” said heather ahtone, Director of Cultural Affairs at First Americans Museum. “We believe that reuniting cultural materials with their relative families is a benefit to the tribal nations and the collecting institutions, producing new knowledge and art that benefits museum audiences. We are using our current loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian to work through the process of reuniting objects with their makers’ relatives. Our goal is to identify a core practice for working with the tribal nations and their citizens that can be modelled and shared. We seek to publish any new practices that emerge from this work, which is aimed at fostering beneficial experiences for museum professionals, members of the cultural community, and museum audiences. We imagine that through this work, by connecting collections with their cultural communities, we can support museums in efforts to reconcile the history of violence they have enacted.” 

For all foundation grants awarded, and for more information about these grants, please see the grants database. For information about the Art Design Chicago grants awarded in October 2023, please see the Art Design Chicago grants awarded story. 

October 2023 Grants Awarded

Strategic Initiatives

The foundation partners with organizations that are committed to inclusive and equitable practices and that engage research and learning models with the potential to offer expanded perspectives for the fields of American art.

Àkéte Art Foundation, Lagos, Nigeria, to support the fourth edition of the Lagos Biennial, dedicated to the theme of refuge, as well as the participation of US artists and speakers, $150,000 

Amistad Research Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, to support a multi-year research and conservation project of the series of forty-one paintings by Jacob Lawrence devoted to Toussaint Louverture in the collection of the Amistad Research Center, $1,000,000 

Arts Alliance Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, to support Arts Alliance Illinois in its work to strengthen the vitality and resiliency of the arts, $50,000 

Black Trustee Alliance for Art Museums, New York, New York, to support the alliance’s 2024 convening, an annual gathering of Black trustees serving on the boards of art museums across the country, $25,000 

CEC ArtsLink, New York, New York, to support a small group of US-based artists and representatives of potential international host organizations to visit Bishkek, Kyrgyztan in Fall 2023 during the Trash Festival led by former ArtsLink International Fellow Bermet Borubaeva, enabling the group to further hone their concept for the US fellowship program to be launched in 2024, $20,800 

First Americans Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to support the research and documentary project WINIKO: Reunions (January 2023–December 2024), which informs and will live on beyond the run of WINIKO: Life of an Object, an exhibition opening in Spring 2025, $150,000 

Folded Map, Chicago, Illinois, to support the Folded Map Curriculum Project, an extension of photographer and social-justice artist Tonika Johnson’s Folded Map project exploring the history and legacy of segregation in Chicago, $30,000 

Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art, Paris, France, to support a keynote presentation by an American artist and related events on the theme of materiality at the 36th International Committee for Art History Congress in Lyon, France, June 23–28, 2024, $15,000 

Ma’s House & BIPOC Art Studio, Inc., Southampton, New York, to support the one-on-one documentation of artists and the provision of weekly artist-led presentations and artistic workshops for Shinnecock people local to Southampton, NY, from January through August 2024, $25,000 

Museum of Vernacular Arts and Knowledge, Chicago, Illinois, to support The New Art School Modality, a new art school model that provides free or low-cost art and art history courses delivered online and in person to a culturally, geographically, and generationally diverse community of students, $150,000 

NXTHVN, Next Haven, Connecticut, to support Black Portraitures: Shifting Paradigms, a major global convening organized by NXTHVN that offers comparative perspectives on the historical and contemporary roles played by artists, intellectuals, curators, practitioners, scholars, writers, and collectors in generating new discourse that centers the Black subject in Africa and its diaspora, $95,000 

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art, Oviedo, Florida, to support five years of operating costs, enabling Panorama to grow its networks, reach, and capacity to continue to advocate on behalf of an expanded narrative of American art, $250,000 

Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon, to support the official US presentation of Jeffrey Gibson: the space in which to place me at the 60th International Art Exhibition in Venice, $250,000 

Exhibitions

The Terra Foundation supports temporary exhibitions worldwide that expand histories of American art, and it encourages exhibitions that build on existing initiatives at organizations engaged in transforming how stories of American art are told.

Abbe Museum, Bar Harbor, Maine, to support the planning of the exhibition Twisted Path: In the Shadow of the Eagle (working title), to be installed at the Abbe Museum in 2025, $75,000 

Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, Nebraska, to support the solo exhibition Paul Stephan Benjamin: Variations on Blackness, opening in May 2024 at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, $25,000 

Biennale of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, to support the 24th edition of the Biennale of Sydney, opening in spring 2024, $200,000 

Blaffer Art Museum, Houston, Texas, to support the exhibition Cian Dayrit: Counter Cartographies (working title), opening in May 2024 at the Blaffer Art Museum, $50,000 

CALA Alliance, Phoenix, Arizona, to support the exhibition planning for CALA Alliance–organized exhibitions at the ASU Art Museum (ASUAM), $75,000 

California State University Sacramento, University Galleries, Sacramento, California, to support the exhibition She Laughs Back: Feminist Wit in 1970s Bay Area Art, opening in February 2024 at the University Library Gallery at Sacramento State, $35,000 

Creative Alliance, Baltimore, Maryland, in partnership with TENT Rotterdam, to support the co-exhibition and artist exchange of Walk On By in January 2024, $200,000 

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, East Lansing, Michigan, to support the multi-venue exhibition Samia Halaby: Eye Witness, co-organized by the Broad Art Museum and the Eskenazi Museum of Art, $150,000 

Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine, to support the Penobscot Basket Exhibition (working title), a co-organized exhibition by Farnsworth Art Museum and Hudson Museum at the University of Maine, $125,000 

Frye Art Museum, Seattle, Washington, to support the exhibition Sky Hopinka, opening in February 2024 at the Frye Art Museum, $60,000 

Gallery 400 at University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, to support the Chicago presentation at Gallery 400 of the exhibition Contemporary Ex-Votos: Devotion Beyond Medium, opening in January 2024, $53,000 

Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia, to support the planning process for the exhibition The Sculpture of Edmonia Lewis, $75,000 

Georgia State University, Africana Studies Department, Atlanta, Georgia, to support the planning and research for the exhibition The World(s) She Made: Composing the Radical Lives of Kathleen Neal Cleaver, $75,000 

Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, Fort Collins, Colorado, to support qóóxoneeʼnohoʼóoóyóóʼ /Ho’honáa’e Tsé’amoo’ese: Art from the Rocky Mountain Homelands of the Hinono’ei and Tsistsistas Nations at Colorado State University, $30,000 

Gund Gallery at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, to support the exhibition Ming Smith (working title), opening in August 2024 at the Gund Gallery at Kenyon College, $100,000 

Heard Museum, Phoenix, Arizona, to support the exhibition Maria & Modernism at the Heard Museum in 2024, $100,000 

Madison Square Park Conservancy, New York, New York, to support the public outdoor exhibition Rose B. Simpson: Seed in Madison Square Park, $100,000 

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas, to support the exhibition Surrealism and Us: Caribbean and African Diasporic Artists since 1940 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, $100,000 

Moderna Museet Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden, to support the exhibition Vaginal Davis: Magnificent Product at Moderna Museet, $200,000 

Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, to support the planning process for the exhibition Japan/America (working title) at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, $75,000 

Museum of the Moving Image (MoMI), Astoria, New York, to support the exhibition Auriea Harvey: My Veins Are the Wires, My Body Is Your Keyboard at the Museum of the Moving Image, $150,000 

National Nordic Museum, Seattle, Washington, to support the exhibition Nordic Utopia: African Americans in the 20th Century at the National Nordic Museum, $75,000 

National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC, to support the exhibition Brilliant Exiles: American Women in Paris, 1900–1939 at the National Portrait Gallery, $100,000 

Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, to support the exhibition Artepaño/Kerchief Art at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, $75,000   

Royal Academy of Arts, London, United Kingdom, to support the exhibition Entangled Pasts, Art, Enslavement and Belonging: 1768–now at the Royal Academy of Arts, $200,000 

SITE Santa Fe, Santa Fe, New Mexico, to support the exhibition Teresita Fernández / Robert Smithson at SITE Santa Fe, $100,000 

Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum, Washington, DC, to support the exhibition A Bold and Beautiful Vision: A Century of Black Arts Education in Washington, D.C., 1900–2000 at the Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum, $200,000

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, to support the interdisciplinary exhibition Sightlines: Chinatown and Beyond at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, $165,000

The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland, to support the summative career retrospective Joyce J. Scott at the Baltimore Museum of Art, $200,000 

The Drawing Center, New York, New York, to support the exhibition Joan Jonas: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral at the Drawing Center, $25,000 

The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, California, to support the exhibition Sargent Claude Johnson at the Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, $150,000 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, to support The Harlem Renaissance and Trans-Atlantic Modernism at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, $150,000 

The Rector & Visitors of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, to support the traveling exhibition O’POWA O’MENG The Art and Legacy of Jody Folwell, co-organized by the Minneapolis Institute of Art and The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, $125,000 

Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill, New York, to support Native Prospects: Indigeneity and Landscape Painting at the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, $100,000 

Turner Contemporary, Margate, Kent, United Kingdom, to support Ed Clark (working title) at Turner Contemporary, the first solo institutional exhibition outside of the United States devoted to the artist, $70,000 

University of Illinois – Krannert Art Museum, Champaign, Illinois, to support the retrospective exhibition Millie Wilson: The Museum of Lesbian Dreams at the University of Illinois’s Krannert Art Museum (KAM), $100,000 

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, to support the exhibition Dear Mazie at the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University, $120,000 

Art Design Chicago

Art Design Chicago is a platform for collaboration and exchange developed with cultural practitioners throughout Chicago. The initiative seeks to catalyze transformative approaches to co-creation and community engagement and to stimulate expansive narratives of Chicago art and design, past and present. This round of grants includes support for Art Design Chicago exhibitions, public programs, and resources.

Exhibitions 

6018North, Chicago, Illinois, to support Myth of the Organic City (September 2024–June 2025), a broad-ranging exhibition that provides an overview of Chicago’s early designs, historical development, and contemporary usage of its water, land, and air, $75,000   

Albertine Foundation, New York, New York, to support Opening Passages: Artists Respond to Chicago and Paris (April–July 2024), a multi-site photographic exhibition in Chicago that features recent bodies of work by ten artists who engage the dynamic social landscapes of either Chicago or Paris, $40,000

Arts + Public Life at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, to support All Power to the People: Elizabeth Catlett’s Legacy in Chicago (June–August 2024), an exhibition that highlights the printmaking practice and impact of artist and activist Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), $100,000 

Balzekas Museum of Lithuanian Culture, Chicago, Illinois, to support beLONGING: Lithuanian Artists in Chicago 1900 to Now (September 2024–December 2025), an exhibition exploring identity and place through diverse works, $50,000 

Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, Chicago, Illinois, to support Victoria Martinez: Braiding Histories (March–July 2024), a one-person exhibition that features the art of Chicago-based creative Victoria Martinez, $80,000 

Chicago History Museum, Chicago, Illinois, to support Chicago Designs for Change (May 2024–June 2025), an exhibition that highlights Chicagoans of the 1960s–70s who created art as a catalyst for social change alongside contemporary artists who make art that addresses social issues, including immigration, $150,000 

Chicago Public Library Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, to support Pilsen Days: Photographs by Akito Tsuda (June–December 2024), an exhibition that makes visible the photograph collection of works by Japanese photographer Akito Tsuda, $110,000 

DePaul Art Museum, Chicago, Illinois, to support Edgar Miller: Anti-Modern, 1917–1967 (September 2024–February 2025), the first retrospective and most comprehensive solo presentation of Edgar Miller’s work to date, $110,000  

Design Museum of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, to support Letters Beyond Form: Chicago Types (November 2024–April 2025), an exhibition that looks at typography (the shape and design of letters) within Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods to investigate design legacies and their contemporary echoes, $125,000    

Elmhurst Art Museum, Elmhurst, Illinois, to support A Love Supreme (January–April 2024), an exhibition in which designer Norman Teague responds to jazz musician John Coltrane as muse, providing parallels to Teague’s own life and artistic career, $50,000   

Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN), Chicago, Illinois, to support Inverse Surveillance (October 2024–1st quarter 2025), an installation created by Chicago-based artist Assia Boundaoui with the Arab and Muslim American communities in Chicago that takes the shape of a full-scale labyrinth, $59,000   

Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Chicago, Illinois, to support Chicago as Catalyst: Immigrant Communities Nourish Self-Taught Artists (working title) (October 2024–April 2025), $125,000   

Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, Chicago, Illinois, to support Radical Craft: Arts Education at Hull-House, 1889–1935 (September 2024–July 2025), an exhibition, catalogue, and series of craft workshops that explore the history and legacy of arts education at Hull-House in the early 20th century, $124,000 

Mitchell Museum of the American Indian, Evanston, Illinois, to support Anishinaabe Art: Stories of Today (September 2024–September 2025), an exhibition that examines contemporary approaches to traditional Woodlands style art, $54,000 

Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, Illinois, to support Dawit L. Petros: Prospetto a Mare (September–December 2024), a solo exhibition building on artist Dawit L. Petros’s ongoing exploration of links connecting colonization across time and space, $125,000 

National Museum of Mexican Art, Chicago, Illinois, to support 130 Años: México in the Chicago Columbian Exposition (working title) (April–August 2024), an exhibition that examines the 1893 World’s Fair as a platform for expressions of cultural identity and delves into the similar objectives of many Chicago and Mexican artists, $150,000   

National Public Housing Museum, Chicago, Illinois, to support Still Here: Linking Histories of Displacement (May–December 2024), an exhibition that explores the histories of displacement of Indigenous people and African American families, $150,000 

Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois, to support Immigrant Printing in Chicago (December 2024–March 2025), an exhibition that reflects on the lived experiences of immigrant printers, designers, and bookmakers in Chicago, $40,000 

Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois, to support Indigenous Chicago (September 2024–January 2025), part of a multifaceted initiative developed in a partnership involving the Newberry, $125,000   

Puerto Rican Arts Alliance, Chicago, Illinois, to support Persistence: The Lions’ Roar in the Puerto Rican Arts (Persistencia: El Rugir de los Leones en la Plástica Puertorriqueña) (June–November 2024), $125,000   

Rebuild Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, to support Theaster Gates: When Clouds Roll Away: Reflection and Restoration from the Johnson Archive (May–August 2024), $200,000 

South Asia Institute, Chicago, Illinois, to support Seen and Unseen: South Asian American Art in Chicago (May–September 2024), $100,000   

South Side Community Art Center, Chicago, Illinois, to support ReSOURCE: Art and Resourcefulness in Black Chicago (October–December 2024), a wide-ranging historical and contemporary exhibition that focuses on Black artists in Chicago who work with found objects and repurposed materials, $150,000 

The Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, to support Woven Being: Indigenous Art Histories of Chicagoland (working title) (January–July 2025), an exhibition that offers critical perspectives on the art history of the Chicago region, $150,000   

UIC Gallery 400, Chicago, Illinois, to support Learning Together: Art, Education, and Community (September–December 2024), an exhibition that centers the progressive art pedagogy of a diverse group of Chicago artist educators in the mid-to-late 20th century, $150,000   

Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, Chicago, Illinois, to support Agency: Craft in Chicago from the 1970s–80s and Beyond (September–December 2024), an exhibition primarily focused on fiber, ceramics, jewelry, wood, and glass that highlights the contributions to Chicago’s visual and cultural fabric made by immigrants, $108,000   

Public Programs 

American Indian Center of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, to support Indigenizing Urban Intertribal Arts, a series of artmaking workshops led by Native practitioners that includes contemporary expressions of traditional Indigenous techniques in feather fans, moccasins, quillwork, and Hand Drums, $50,000 

Chicago Art Department, Chicago, Illinois, to support Seeds IV: Healing Stages, an annual initiative that centers BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) voices and cultivates cross-cultural healing through multilayered celebrations, $25,000 

Folded Map, Chicago, Illinois, to support unBLOCKED, an initiative led by social justice artist Tonika Johnson that is a response to racist Land Sale Contracts in the 1950s and ’60s and their lasting impact on today’s residents, $50,000   

Opendox, Kingston, New York, to support Designing For Dignity: A Convening of Possibilities 02, Deem Journal’s second symposium, to be held in person at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and virtually, $50,000 

Public Media Institute (PMI), Chicago, Illinois, to support Artist-Run Legacies: Conversations between Generations of Artist-Run Culture in Chicago, $50,000   

Research and Learning Resources  

Chicago Collections Consortium, Chicago, Illinois, to support A Digital Look at Chicago’s Art Fairs and Art Festivals (working title), a digital exhibition of archival material drawn from an array of collections that documents Chicago’s rich history of art fairs and art festivals and their impact on the diverse communities they serve, $16,000   

Convenings

The foundation supports convenings worldwide that foster exchange and collaboration, such as workshops, symposia, and colloquia. 

Alfredo F. Tadiar Library, San Fernando, La Union, Philippines, to support Networks of Survival, Ecologies of Flourishing, a weeklong convening for artists and academics from different Philippine and Filipinx diasporic contexts, $25,000 

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Houston, Texas, to support Black Artists Retreat (Houston Freedmen Town Edition): Black Land Ownership and Space, a four-day convening in May 2024 organized by the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston in partnership with Houston Freedmen’s Town and the City of Houston, $25,000 

Dia Art Foundation, New York, New York, to support Cameron Rowland at Dia Beacon, an iterative cycle of four gallery talks developed by the artist held over the course of Rowland’s exhibition at Dia Beacon, NY, April 2024–April 2025, $25,000 

di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, Napa, California, to support the final two sessions in June and October 2024 of the multipart convening Towards an Archaeology of the Future, co-organized by the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center (CIMCC), and independent curator Gavin Kroeber, $25,000 

Electronic Arts Intermix, New York, New York, to support Video After Television: Open Circuits Revisited, a three-day series of workshops in May 2024 co-organized by Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), MoMA, and New York University’s Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, to honor the 50th anniversary of MoMA’s exhibition Open Circuits: An International Conference on the Future of Television, $25,000 

Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain, to support Disobeying the mandate, interrupting the narrative, amplifying the apparatus, a convening to be held on September 28–29, 2024, organized by the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza in partnership with grassroots associations Felipa Manuela, Espacio Afro, La Parcería, and Periferia Cimarronas, $25,000 

Serpentine Galleries, London, United Kingdom, to support Infinite Ecologies Marathon, an interdisciplinary festival of ideas that addresses environmental justice and the role played by culture in catalyzing systemic change, $25,000 

The New School, New York, New York, to support Correction*—A Series of Public Convenings on the Perils and Promise of “Correcting” the Past, the final convenings of a two-year research seminar organized by the Vera List Center for Art and Politics (VLC) investigating the theme of correction, are held monthly between January and May 2024, $25,000 

Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France, to support a series of three roundtables with contemporary African American visual artists Glenn Ligon, Jordan Casteel, and Hank Willis Thomas, joined by local French artists, scholars focusing on their work, and museum professionals, $20,000 

University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, Canada, to support Meddling in the Museum Redux, a two-day symposium with an evening public event at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, scheduled for May 2024, $23,850 

University of Minnesota Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota, to support the Truth & Reconciliation Initiative: Harm Reparation Around Repatriation of the Mimbres Collection at the Weisman Art Museum, a convening to be held on June 4–6, 2025, at the Weisman Art Museum of the University of Minnesota, $25,000 

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